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Topic: Oldest Human Remains (Read 19886 times) previous topic - next topic

RAFH, Dean W, Saunt Taunga (+ 2 Hidden) and 2 Guests are viewing this topic.
  • socrates1
Re: Oldest Human Remains
Reply #3900
Quote
Three teams independently dated the finds using uranium isotope decay and several luminescence methods, which determine how long ago mineral grains were last exposed to light. They dated the burned flint tools to about 179,000 years (plus or minus 48,000 years), which fits with other work dating Levallois style tools in Israel to 140,000 to 250,000 years ago. They also dated a sliver of enamel from a tooth to 174,000 years, and say that crust adhering to the upper jaw is at least 185,000 years old.
The jawbone was excavated in the same sedimentary layer as thousands of "museum quality" handaxes and flint tools, says co-author Mina Evron of the University of Haifa. The tools were crafted with a sophisticated method called Levallois technology, which requires abstract thinking. Some researchers have suggested the method was invented by H. sapiens and may mark our species's presence and early steps out of Africa.

Levallois technology in Israel at that time supports a migration INTO Africa not Out of Africa.
As usual there are nay-sayers:
Quote
The dates on the tools seem solid, dating experts say. But several question the dates on the fossil itself, partly because the authors write that the jawbone was scanned using computerized tomography three times, and the x-rays could have influenced the amount of radiation trapped in the tooth enamel, skewing the luminescence dates. Uranium dating expert Alistair Pike of the University of Southampton in the United Kingdom notes that a crust on the jawbone "is heavily contaminated by detritus." The contamination could bias the radiometric dates on the crust, which includes a younger date of 70,000, says geochronologist Warren Sharp of the Berkeley Geochronology Center in California. He and others also note that relying on nearby tools is problematic, because it's possible that the bone was mixed into the tool-bearing layer later in time.

  • VoxRat
  • wtactualf
Re: Oldest Human Remains
Reply #3901
Quote
Three teams independently dated the finds using uranium isotope decay and several luminescence methods, which determine how long ago mineral grains were last exposed to light. They dated the burned flint tools to about 179,000 years (plus or minus 48,000 years), which fits with other work dating Levallois style tools in Israel to 140,000 to 250,000 years ago. They also dated a sliver of enamel from a tooth to 174,000 years, and say that crust adhering to the upper jaw is at least 185,000 years old.
The jawbone was excavated in the same sedimentary layer as thousands of "museum quality" handaxes and flint tools, says co-author Mina Evron of the University of Haifa. The tools were crafted with a sophisticated method called Levallois technology, which requires abstract thinking. Some researchers have suggested the method was invented by H. sapiens and may mark our species's presence and early steps out of Africa.

Levallois technology in Israel at that time supports a migration INTO Africa not Out of Africa.
Is "Socrates" declining to provide the reference or link for fear that readers might actually check for themselves what the authors say about this?
"I understand Donald Trump better than many people because I really am a lot like him." - Dave Hawkins

  • socrates1
Re: Oldest Human Remains
Reply #3902
This is fun. People will have to do some work yourselves. No more spoon feeding.
But if this is too much work for folks, there are lots of other activities in the world for you to enjoy.

  • Faid
Re: Oldest Human Remains
Reply #3903
Quote
Three teams independently dated the finds using uranium isotope decay and several luminescence methods, which determine how long ago mineral grains were last exposed to light. They dated the burned flint tools to about 179,000 years (plus or minus 48,000 years), which fits with other work dating Levallois style tools in Israel to 140,000 to 250,000 years ago. They also dated a sliver of enamel from a tooth to 174,000 years, and say that crust adhering to the upper jaw is at least 185,000 years old.
The jawbone was excavated in the same sedimentary layer as thousands of "museum quality" handaxes and flint tools, says co-author Mina Evron of the University of Haifa. The tools were crafted with a sophisticated method called Levallois technology, which requires abstract thinking. Some researchers have suggested the method was invented by H. sapiens and may mark our species's presence and early steps out of Africa.

Levallois technology in Israel at that time supports a migration INTO Africa not Out of Africa.
Nope. The authors "remain open to the possibility", and that's for the LATE Nubian complex.

You didn't read the paper again, did you?
Who even made the rule that we cannot group ducks and fish together for the simple reason that they are both aquatic? If I want to group them that way and it serves my purpose then I can jolly well do it however I want to and it is still a nested hierarchy and you can't tell me that it's not.

  • VoxRat
  • wtactualf
Re: Oldest Human Remains
Reply #3904
People will have to do some work yourselves. No more spoon feeding.
I guess not "spoon feeding" is "Socrates" new excuse for always intimating, never articulating.
"I understand Donald Trump better than many people because I really am a lot like him." - Dave Hawkins

  • VoxRat
  • wtactualf
Re: Oldest Human Remains
Reply #3905
You didn't read the paper again, did you?
One is reminded of ...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2WZLJpMOxS4
"I understand Donald Trump better than many people because I really am a lot like him." - Dave Hawkins

  • Faid
Re: Oldest Human Remains
Reply #3906
This is fun. People will have to do some work yourselves. No more spoon feeding.
But if this is too much work for folks, there are lots of other activities in the world for you to enjoy.
IOW, "I know the paper does not support my crap in any way, But I want to pretend it does".

Nice try.

BTW:
Quote
The taxonomic identity of the Nubian Complex toolmakers is unknown, as no skeletal evidence has been discovered in association with any such assemblage. Although some archaic forms may have persisted in other parts of Africa at that time [79], the distribution of early anatomically modern human (AMH) remains suggest this species is the most likely candidate to have occupied northeast Africa during the Late Pleistocene. Cranial fragments of Homo sapiens found in the Omo river valley, Ethiopia (Fig. 1), represent the first appearance of AMH in East Africa ∼195 ka [80]. Remains from Herto [81], Singa [82], and Mumba [83] in East Africa date to between ∼160 and ∼100 ka. Skeletal remains from Jebel Irhoud in Morocco show that an early form of Homo sapiens had expanded into North Africa as early as ∼160 ka [84], and a modern human child discovered at Grotte des Contrebandiers in Morocco verifies the presence of AMH in North Africa by ∼110 ka [85]. At the site of Taramsa Hill 1 in the lower Nile Valley, an AMH child dated to ∼55 ka was found in association with a lithic industry (Taramsan) that is thought to have developed out of the late Nubian Complex [21], [86]. Despite the lack of direct evidence, given that AMH are the only species to have been found in North Africa from the late Middle Pleistocene onward, it is warranted to speculate that the Nubian Complex toolmakers were modern humans.

If MSA inhabitants of northeast Africa were AMHs, then the presence of a regionally-specific African MSA industry in Dhofar is relevant to the question of modern human expansion. The route and timing of Homo sapiens exit(s) from Africa is the subject of considerable debate [86]-[89]. Two pathways are commonly considered: the northern dispersal route postulates population movement from northeast Africa across the Sinai Peninsula into the Levant through the 'Levantine Corridor.' Alternatively (or concurrently), the southern dispersal route describes a demographic expansion through the 'Arabian Corridor', from the Horn of Africa across the southern Red Sea into Yemen.

Movement through the northern dispersal route is based on AMH remains discovered at Skhul and Qafzeh in Israel dating to early MIS 5 [90], [91]. Comparison of MSA/MP and LSA/UP lithic assemblages between northeast Africa and the Levant, however, does not reveal any evidence of cultural exchange. Marks [92] observes that the archaeological sequences from these two regions follow separate trajectories of development, suggesting there was no exchange of technologies. Vermeersch [12] arrives at a similar conclusion: "in the cultural material [of Egypt] no connections with the Levant are apparent."

Genetic studies of human mtDNA favor the southern dispersal route as the primary conduit for early modern human expansion(s) out of Africa [93]-[97]. All non-Africans derive exclusively from basal mtDNA haplogroup L3 in Africa, which gave rise to descendant lineages M and N outside of Africa [98]. Haplogroups M and N are present in South and East Asia, Australia, and the Americas, but M lacks deep roots in western Eurasia [94]. This geographic patterning is most likely to have arisen if the first successful pioneers of the extant non-African population moved through Arabia and subsequently diversified in or east of the Peninsula.

To some degree, the discovery of late Nubian Complex assemblages in Dhofar upholds this model.
:rofl:

Poor "socrates".
Who even made the rule that we cannot group ducks and fish together for the simple reason that they are both aquatic? If I want to group them that way and it serves my purpose then I can jolly well do it however I want to and it is still a nested hierarchy and you can't tell me that it's not.

Re: Oldest Human Remains
Reply #3907
Quote
Three teams independently dated the finds using uranium isotope decay and several luminescence methods, which determine how long ago mineral grains were last exposed to light. They dated the burned flint tools to about 179,000 years (plus or minus 48,000 years), which fits with other work dating Levallois style tools in Israel to 140,000 to 250,000 years ago. They also dated a sliver of enamel from a tooth to 174,000 years, and say that crust adhering to the upper jaw is at least 185,000 years old.
The jawbone was excavated in the same sedimentary layer as thousands of "museum quality" handaxes and flint tools, says co-author Mina Evron of the University of Haifa. The tools were crafted with a sophisticated method called Levallois technology, which requires abstract thinking. Some researchers have suggested the method was invented by H. sapiens and may mark our species's presence and early steps out of Africa.

Levallois technology in Israel at that time supports a migration INTO Africa not Out of Africa.
As usual there are nay-sayers:
Quote
The dates on the tools seem solid, dating experts say. But several question the dates on the fossil itself, partly because the authors write that the jawbone was scanned using computerized tomography three times, and the x-rays could have influenced the amount of radiation trapped in the tooth enamel, skewing the luminescence dates. Uranium dating expert Alistair Pike of the University of Southampton in the United Kingdom notes that a crust on the jawbone "is heavily contaminated by detritus." The contamination could bias the radiometric dates on the crust, which includes a younger date of 70,000, says geochronologist Warren Sharp of the Berkeley Geochronology Center in California. He and others also note that relying on nearby tools is problematic, because it's possible that the bone was mixed into the tool-bearing layer later in time.
I wonder why Socrates didn't provide a reference for this article, which is titled "This ancient jawbone suggests our species left Africa 40,000 years earlier than expected." And contains the following:
Quote
Before now, the earliest modern human fossils outside Africa came from the nearby Skhul Cave on Mount Carmel and Qafzeh Cave in Israel, sites dated to between 80,000 to 120,000 years old. But our species arose in Africa some 300,000 years ago, according to new dates on a skull in Morocco last year, and some researchers have claimed an early exodus from Africa based on fragmentary fossils and stone tools in the Middle East, Arabia, and China. But securely dated sites with accepted human fossils outside of Africa have been lacking.
This is fun.
You mean quote-mining?
People will have to do some work yourselves.
You mean discovering the sources of your quote mines and what they actually say?
No more spoon feeding.
You mean no more providing context for your snippets that show they say the exact opposite of what you pretend they do?
But if this is too much work for folks, there are lots of other activities in the world for you to enjoy.
One of them is being honest. Many people find that enjoyable. Perhaps you might like to give it a try some time.

  • socrates1
Re: Oldest Human Remains
Reply #3908
Quote
Three teams independently dated the finds using uranium isotope decay and several luminescence methods, which determine how long ago mineral grains were last exposed to light. They dated the burned flint tools to about 179,000 years (plus or minus 48,000 years), which fits with other work dating Levallois style tools in Israel to 140,000 to 250,000 years ago. They also dated a sliver of enamel from a tooth to 174,000 years, and say that crust adhering to the upper jaw is at least 185,000 years old.
The jawbone was excavated in the same sedimentary layer as thousands of "museum quality" handaxes and flint tools, says co-author Mina Evron of the University of Haifa. The tools were crafted with a sophisticated method called Levallois technology, which requires abstract thinking. Some researchers have suggested the method was invented by H. sapiens and may mark our species's presence and early steps out of Africa.

Levallois technology in Israel at that time supports a migration INTO Africa not Out of Africa.
As usual there are nay-sayers:
Quote
The dates on the tools seem solid, dating experts say. But several question the dates on the fossil itself, partly because the authors write that the jawbone was scanned using computerized tomography three times, and the x-rays could have influenced the amount of radiation trapped in the tooth enamel, skewing the luminescence dates. Uranium dating expert Alistair Pike of the University of Southampton in the United Kingdom notes that a crust on the jawbone "is heavily contaminated by detritus." The contamination could bias the radiometric dates on the crust, which includes a younger date of 70,000, says geochronologist Warren Sharp of the Berkeley Geochronology Center in California. He and others also note that relying on nearby tools is problematic, because it's possible that the bone was mixed into the tool-bearing layer later in time.
This is great. People here are now doing some work on their own and not counting on me to spoon feed you.
But I will ignore anything of yours that is not accompanied with a reference link and copy and paste. You can do the same for what I post. Finally a level playing field.

  • VoxRat
  • wtactualf
Re: Oldest Human Remains
Reply #3909
... I will ignore anything of yours that is not accompanied with a reference link and copy and paste. You can do the same for what I post.
Bookmarked.

Quote
Finally a level playing field.
Something has changed ?  :dunno:
"I understand Donald Trump better than many people because I really am a lot like him." - Dave Hawkins

  • socrates1
Re: Oldest Human Remains
Reply #3910
Quote
They dated the burned flint tools to about 179,000 years (plus or minus 48,000 years), which fits with other work dating Levallois style tools in Israel to 140,000 to 250,000 years ago.

  • uncool
Re: Oldest Human Remains
Reply #3911
Can't even provide a link in his first post after saying to ignore anything without it.

I'm shocked, shocked.

  • VoxRat
  • wtactualf
Re: Oldest Human Remains
Reply #3912
lol
"I understand Donald Trump better than many people because I really am a lot like him." - Dave Hawkins

  • socrates1
Re: Oldest Human Remains
Reply #3913
Quote
As the late Nubian Complex at Aybut Al Auwal is dated to MIS 5c, slightly earlier than the late Nubian Complex in Africa [11], we remain open to the possibility that the late Nubian Complex originated in Arabia, and subsequently spread back into northeast Africa. Given the coarse chronological resolution in both Africa and Arabia (Table 1), however, the question of directionality cannot be adequately addressed, suffice to say there is cultural exchange across the Red Sea during MIS 5c.

  • RickB
Re: Oldest Human Remains
Reply #3914
Quote
Abstract
To date, the earliest modern human fossils found outside of Africa are dated to around 90,000 to 120,000 years ago at the Levantine sites of Skhul and Qafzeh. A maxilla and associated dentition recently discovered at Misliya Cave, Israel, was dated to 177,000 to 194,000 years ago, suggesting that members of the Homo sapiens clade left Africa earlier than previously thought. This finding changes our view on modern human dispersal and is consistent with recent genetic studies, which have posited the possibility of an earlier dispersal of Homo sapiens around 220,000 years ago. The Misliya maxilla is associated with full-fledged Levallois technology in the Levant, suggesting that the emergence of this technology is linked to the appearance of Homo sapiens in the region, as has been documented in Africa.

From the paper referenced by the SciMag article

  • VoxRat
  • wtactualf
Re: Oldest Human Remains
Reply #3915
Quote
As the late Nubian Complex at Aybut Al Auwal is dated to MIS 5c, slightly earlier than the late Nubian Complex in Africa [11], we remain open to the possibility that the late Nubian Complex originated in Arabia, and subsequently spread back into northeast Africa. Given the coarse chronological resolution in both Africa and Arabia (Table 1), however, the question of directionality cannot be adequately addressed, suffice to say there is cultural exchange across the Red Sea during MIS 5c.
Quote from: "Socrates"
I will ignore anything of yours that is not accompanied with a reference link
"I understand Donald Trump better than many people because I really am a lot like him." - Dave Hawkins

  • RickB
Re: Oldest Human Remains
Reply #3916
Quote
As the late Nubian Complex at Aybut Al Auwal is dated to MIS 5c, slightly earlier than the late Nubian Complex in Africa [11], we remain open to the possibility that the late Nubian Complex originated in Arabia, and subsequently spread back into northeast Africa. Given the coarse chronological resolution in both Africa and Arabia (Table 1), however, the question of directionality cannot be adequately addressed, suffice to say there is cultural exchange across the Red Sea during MIS 5c.


MIS 5c  ~96,000 years ago

Re: Oldest Human Remains
Reply #3917
It's funny how the picture changes when a link is provided, right Doug?

The Nubian Complex of Dhofar, Oman: An African Middle Stone Age Industry in Southern Arabia

Quote
Genetic studies of human mtDNA favor the southern dispersal route as the primary conduit for early modern human expansion(s) out of Africa [93]-[97]. All non-Africans derive exclusively from basal mtDNA haplogroup L3 in Africa, which gave rise to descendant lineages M and N outside of Africa [98]. Haplogroups M and N are present in South and East Asia, Australia, and the Americas, but M lacks deep roots in western Eurasia [94]. This geographic patterning is most likely to have arisen if the first successful pioneers of the extant non-African population moved through Arabia and subsequently diversified in or east of the Peninsula.

To some degree, the discovery of late Nubian Complex assemblages in Dhofar upholds this model. The distribution of this technocomplex in the middle and lower Nile Valley, the Horn of Africa, Yemen, and now Dhofar provides a trail of diagnostic artifacts - stone breadcrumbs - spread across the southern dispersal route out of Africa. The close similarity between African and Arabian late Nubian Complex assemblages suggests that these sites are more or less contemporaneous; they were separated for an insufficient amount of time for independently derived technological traits to develop between regions. As the late Nubian Complex at Aybut Al Auwal is dated to MIS 5c, slightly earlier than the late Nubian Complex in Africa [11], we remain open to the possibility that the late Nubian Complex originated in Arabia, and subsequently spread back into northeast Africa. Given the coarse chronological resolution in both Africa and Arabia (Table 1), however, the question of directionality cannot be adequately addressed, suffice to say there is cultural exchange across the Red Sea during MIS 5c.

Coalescence ages for non-African mtDNA lineages range from 70 to 45 ka, depending on the use of different mutation rates, calibration methods, and statistical models [95], [99], placing these mtDNA studies at odds with the archaeological picture beginning to emerge from Arabia. We consider three possible explanations to reconcile the younger mtDNA and older archaeological evidence. First, groups moving out of Africa during MIS 5 may have carried older mtDNA types, such as L3′4′6′ [98]. Subsequent population bottlenecks from MIS 4 to MIS 2 are likely to have culled most of the founding populations in Arabia, which might be consistent with the rare presence of undifferentiated L3* lineages in Yemen [100]. Moreover, traces of the primarily East African haplogroup L4 have been reported in southern Arabia, with coalescence age estimates around 95 ka [98]. Unfortunately, little is known of this clade at present; too few L4 haplotypes have been observed to draw any conclusive phylogeographic inferences.

A second possibility is that the mtDNA coalescence age of L3 would appear younger than the time of initial expansion if pioneering groups moving into Arabia had been sex-biased toward a low number of females [101]. Finally, it may be the case that the Nubian Complex population did not expand past Dhofar and did not survive in Arabia over the course of the Late Pleistocene; hence, it is not represented in the extant genetic record.

ETA - the abstract

Quote
Despite the numerous studies proposing early human population expansions from Africa into Arabia during the Late Pleistocene, no archaeological sites have yet been discovered in Arabia that resemble a specific African industry, which would indicate demographic exchange across the Red Sea. Here we report the discovery of a buried site and more than 100 new surface scatters in the Dhofar region of Oman belonging to a regionally-specific African lithic industry - the late Nubian Complex - known previously only from the northeast and Horn of Africa during Marine Isotope Stage 5, ∼128,000 to 74,000 years ago. Two optically stimulated luminescence age estimates from the open-air site of Aybut Al Auwal in Oman place the Arabian Nubian Complex at ∼106,000 years ago, providing archaeological evidence for the presence of a distinct northeast African Middle Stone Age technocomplex in southern Arabia sometime in the first half of Marine Isotope Stage 5.
  • Last Edit: April 17, 2018, 03:17:36 PM by Dean W

  • socrates1
Re: Oldest Human Remains
Reply #3918
Quote
A series of nine TL dates on burnt flints from Square L10 and N12 in the vicinity of the [Misliya Cave] human fossil (Fig. 1, A and B) provided a mean age of 179 ± 48 thousand years (ky) (2s)(range=212 to 140 ky) (11)

All these dates, except for the U-series dating of the dentine, which exclude the possibility of recent intrusion, fall within the time range for the Early Levantine Mousterian lithic industry ( Tabun D-type)observed at Tabun, Hayonim, and Misliya caves (i.e., ~250 to ~140 ky) (11-13) and are older than the upper range defined for the EMP sequence in Misliya Cave (>165 ky) (11). Collectively, the evidence suggests an early marine isotope stage 6(MIS 6) age for the Misliya-1 fossil. The age range for Misliya-1, based on dates directly connected with the fossil (U-Th on crust providing the minimum boundary and the maximum boundary of US-ESR on the enamel of I2), is between 177 and 194 ky [for details and calculation methods, see(9) and fig. S2

The Levant sites are older than the Nile site dates.

  • Last Edit: April 17, 2018, 03:30:48 PM by socrates1

  • VoxRat
  • wtactualf
Re: Oldest Human Remains
Reply #3919
Quote
A series of nine TL dates on burnt flints from Square L10 and N12 in the vicinity of the [Misliya Cave] human fossil (Fig. 1, A and B) provided a mean age of 179 ± 48 thousand years (ky) (2s)(range=212 to 140 ky) (11)

All these dates, except for the U-series dating of the dentine, which exclude the possibility of recent intrusion, fall within the time range for the Early Levantine Mousterian lithic industry ( Tabun D-type)observed at Tabun, Hayonim, and Misliya caves (i.e., ~250 to ~140 ky) (11-13) and are older than the upper range defined for the EMP sequence in Misliya Cave (>165 ky) (11). Collectively, the evidence suggests an early marine isotope stage 6(MIS 6) age for the Misliya-1 fossil. The age range for Misliya-1, based on dates directly connected with the fossil (U-Th on crust providing the minimum boundary and the maximum boundary of US-ESR on the enamel of I2), is between 177 and 194 ky [for details and calculation methods, see(9) and fig. S2
Quote from: "Socrates"
I will ignore anything of yours that is not accompanied with a reference link
This is fun.
  • Last Edit: April 17, 2018, 03:33:51 PM by VoxRat
"I understand Donald Trump better than many people because I really am a lot like him." - Dave Hawkins

  • socrates1
Re: Oldest Human Remains
Reply #3920
Quote
A series of nine TL dates on burnt flints from Square L10 and N12 in the vicinity of the [Misliya Cave] human fossil (Fig. 1, A and B) provided a mean age of 179 ± 48 thousand years (ky) (2s)(range=212 to 140 ky) (11)

All these dates, except for the U-series dating of the dentine, which exclude the possibility of recent intrusion, fall within the time range for the Early Levantine Mousterian lithic industry ( Tabun D-type)observed at Tabun, Hayonim, and Misliya caves (i.e., ~250 to ~140 ky) (11-13) and are older than the upper range defined for the EMP sequence in Misliya Cave (>165 ky) (11). Collectively, the evidence suggests an early marine isotope stage 6(MIS 6) age for the Misliya-1 fossil. The age range for Misliya-1, based on dates directly connected with the fossil (U-Th on crust providing the minimum boundary and the maximum boundary of US-ESR on the enamel of I2), is between 177 and 194 ky [for details and calculation methods, see(9) and fig. S2

The Levant sites are older than the Nile site dates.


Those who want to claim that the Omo 1 site is earlier, could tell us how the lineage goes from the Omo 1 site. That would definitely be interesting.
  • Last Edit: April 17, 2018, 04:03:03 PM by socrates1

  • socrates1
Re: Oldest Human Remains
Reply #3921
Quote
A series of nine TL dates on burnt flints from Square L10 and N12 in the vicinity of the [Misliya Cave] human fossil (Fig. 1, A and B) provided a mean age of 179 ± 48 thousand years (ky) (2s)(range=212 to 140 ky) (11)

All these dates, except for the U-series dating of the dentine, which exclude the possibility of recent intrusion, fall within the time range for the Early Levantine Mousterian lithic industry ( Tabun D-type)observed at Tabun, Hayonim, and Misliya caves (i.e., ~250 to ~140 ky) (11-13) and are older than the upper range defined for the EMP sequence in Misliya Cave (>165 ky) (11). Collectively, the evidence suggests an early marine isotope stage 6(MIS 6) age for the Misliya-1 fossil. The age range for Misliya-1, based on dates directly connected with the fossil (U-Th on crust providing the minimum boundary and the maximum boundary of US-ESR on the enamel of I2), is between 177 and 194 ky [for details and calculation methods, see(9) and fig. S2

The Levant sites are older than the Nile site dates.


This alone is enough to show us that the migration was FROM the Middle East and INTO Africa.

  • socrates1
Re: Oldest Human Remains
Reply #3922
This is fun. People will have to do some work yourselves. No more spoon feeding.
But if this is too much work for folks, there are lots of other activities in the world for you to enjoy.
Perhaps people have taken my advice and found other activities in the world for them to enjoy. Good news.

Re: Oldest Human Remains
Reply #3923
Yup, now that you are no longer posting reference links, everyone is free to ignore everything you post. This whole thread can now consist entirely of you posting random unreferenced quotes accompanied by random unrelated assertions. It must be a dream come true. Except...don't you already have a blog?

Re: Oldest Human Remains
Reply #3924
For reference:

The Earliest Modern Humans Outside of Africa

Quote
To date, the earliest modern human fossils found outside of Africa are dated to around 90,000 to 120,000 years ago at the Levantine sites of Skhul and Qafzeh. A maxilla and associated dentition recently discovered at Misliya Cave, Israel, was dated to 177,000 to 194,000 years ago, suggesting that members of the Homo sapiens clade left Africa earlier than previously thought. This finding changes our view on modern human dispersal and is consistent with recent genetic studies, which have posited the possibility of an earlier dispersal of Homo sapiens around 220,000 years ago. The Misliya maxilla is associated with full-fledged Levallois technology in the Levant, suggesting that the emergence of this technology is linked to the appearance of Homo sapiens in the region, as has been documented in Africa.

Deeply divergent archaic mitochondrial genome provides lower time boundary for African gene flow into Neanderthals

Quote
Ancient DNA is revealing new insights into the genetic relationship between Pleistocene hominins and modern humans. Nuclear DNA indicated Neanderthals as a sister group of Denisovans after diverging from modern humans. However, the closer affinity of the Neanderthal mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) to modern humans than Denisovans has recently been suggested as the result of gene flow from an African source into Neanderthals before 100,000 years ago. Here we report the complete mtDNA of an archaic femur from the Hohlenstein-Stadel (HST) cave in southwestern Germany. HST carries the deepest divergent mtDNA lineage that splits from other Neanderthals ∼270,000 years ago, providing a lower boundary for the time of the putative mtDNA introgression event. We demonstrate that a complete Neanderthal mtDNA replacement is feasible over this time interval even with minimal hominin introgression. The highly divergent HST branch is indicative of greater mtDNA diversity during the Middle Pleistocene than in later periods.

ETA

Oldest Homo sapiens bones ever found shake foundations of the human story
 


Quote
The tools the people at Jebel Irhoud were making were based on a knapping technique called Levallois, a sophisticated way of shaping stone tools. The date of 300,000 years ago adds to a growing realisation that Levallois originates a lot earlier than we thought.

It's interesting that the "full-fledged" Levallois technology in the Levant is pre-dated by the Levallois culture in Africa, don't people think?

  • Last Edit: April 17, 2018, 06:03:07 PM by Dean W