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Messages - borealis

1
Who's known for killing and maiming people, Dave? Antifa protesters or the Klan/white supremacists/nazis? Come on, you must know the answer to that one.
Both.  (Talking about currently, not in the past)
In other words, ignoring a hell of a lot of context. Literally more than a century of context.

Even currently the tally of violence is pretty one-sided. Alt-right white supremacists have done a lot of killing and maiming in the US in the past several years. Antifa seem to have damaged some property and punched a couple people.
2
What is the most horrifying thing that you see the Republican Party doing right now?

dropping health care for millions of children
encouraging ICE to act like brutal goons
removing multiple environmental protections
dropping regulations on agri-chemicals, mining, and big oil
reducing safety regulations in heavy industry, including mining
selling off or opening for oil and mining of national parks and monuments
destroying trade confidence by dicking around with NAFTA and applying outrageous tariffs that they will lose in court
pushing for a completely unncessary war with NK

lots more.
destroying global confidence in American competence leading to destabilisation in some places
3
Who's known for killing and maiming people, Dave? Antifa protesters or the Klan/white supremacists/nazis? Come on, you must know the answer to that one.
Both.  (Talking about currently, not in the past)

Name the killing maiming antifa incidents.
4
Think praying is incoming.
5
Who's known for killing and maiming people, Dave? Antifa protesters or the Klan/white supremacists/nazis? Come on, you must know the answer to that one.
6
Well yes. It is likely to me that there are huge players in some European castle - Trump is small potatoes to them - playing a much higher level of chess.

Are they... reptilians?  :ohmy:
7
Dave: re Devin Nunes memo:

Quote
House Intelligence Committee Chairman Devin Nunes, R-Calif., told Fox News in December that his investigators have already uncovered evidence of abuse in the U.S. government's surveillance practices.
"I believe there's evidence that abuses have occurred," Nunes said at the time.
Nunes pointed to the leaked conversation of former national security adviser, Gen. Mike Flynn with the Russian ambassador.
On Thursday, the Senate voted 65-34 to reauthorize a FISA provision that allows U.S. spy agencies to conduct surveillance on foreign targets abroad for six years. The bill, which already has been passed by the House, now heads to the White House,where President Donald Trump has said he will sign it into law.

What remains a mystery is WHY he would sign it into law after it was allegedly so shockingly abused and WHY it passed the House without the Nunes or Amash amendments to safeguard the American people's privacy.[
/quote]

https://pjmedia.com/trending/gop-reps-demand-shocking-troubling-memo-fisa-abuses-made-public/

Iow, Devin Nunes is an idiot, and the GOP nor Trump gave a shit about how shocking or alarming his memo is. Otherwise the above bit of legislation would not be happening.

Really Dave, try logic. Try reason.
8
ANTIFA assholes like Valor causing trouble and getting arrested at a Freedom Event last night ...



You are a seriously gullible sucker.
9
That wasn't the experiment you liar.

No, it was careless, ignorant, unthinking behaviour on your part. But don't go trumpeting 'experiments' when you're really just too stubborn and lazy to build a fence, and make up some stupid rationale for sticking all your animals in a cage.
10
And no, the Bahamas doesn't cut it.

Virtually any beach, salt or fresh water, should 'cut it'. Or any windy plain. Or any mountain valley. All of these show how erosion works, how water and wind move sand and dust, how it deposits, how the terrain affects those deposits.

Add time and compression.

But since you don't believe in real time, you're left helplessly and foolishly babbling about how it couldn't have happened without a Flood. Which your own God-given common sense and ability to reason ought to have understood by now to be a myth, a legend, a fabrication, at best an exaggeration.
11
Now take this fact ... call it Fact #1

Combine with Fact #2 ... that it's common knowledge now that overgrazing helps create deserts ...

Combine with Fact #3 ... that Paul Ehrlich claimed that the Sahara Desert was caused in part by overgrazing.

And voila! you have a case (weak though it is) for "Overgrazing Caused the Sahara."  (Lots of evidence from ancient history is weak for obvious reasons.)

Go back and read about the number of people alive in the whole world at that time, Dave. There literally were not enough people to herd enough animals to significantly affect the advancement of desertification.

Even using your mad Noah's flood belief, there could not have been enough people living there, or enough cattle. If you say it was 'pre-flood' and lots of people, then there shouldn't be any paleo art left there - it would have been destroyed by the Flood. And if you say it was after the flood, there definitely weren't enough people or animals around to overgraze a ten acre pasture.
12
Also informed by Ehrlich.  Is he a kook?

Ehrlich, though a smart man, is a biologist, a zoologist, and more specifically, an entomologist. I don't expect him to be particularly well grounded in prehistoric anthropology.

Yeah, Ehrlich had his areas of expertise.  But when holds him up as  source that needs to be refuted, even though Dave says that gave no reason for what he said, then why even bother with a refutation beyond maybe "He was wrong, I'll defend this when you give me a reason to do so."



Ehrlich is a typical alarmist and an egotist. Dave is a little too young to remember the period in which Ehrlich was most famous among the pop-anthro crowd. I am not too young, and am pretty cynical about many of the popular 'science' books of the era.
13
Also informed by Ehrlich.  Is he a kook?

Ehrlich, though a smart man, is a biologist, a zoologist, and more specifically, an entomologist. I don't expect him to be particularly well grounded in prehistoric anthropology.
14
And talking snakes.  You'd have to be an idiot not to.

I could almost buy the talking snake - hallucinations are human experiences, and a starving human, perhaps even bitten by a snake, or at least seeing one, might easily hallucinate a garden full of easily gotten food that they sadly couldn't eat. Heart wrenching, really.
15
Pingu's climate theory is WILD speculation. 

No it isn't. It's backed up by hard science.

Quote
At least mine has some footing in reality.

Your reality.

No. Reality reality.

I bet you don't have the first clue about Pingu's theory.

You lose. I understood the science first time around - geology's one of may favourite sources - and the physical evidence is soundly presented and understandable in more than one article, besides Pingu's exposition. You should try understanding it yourself, since you clearly do not.

Dave, do you believe
Jonah survived in the belly of a whale?
Moses and Aaron turned staves into snakes?
God sent bears to tear apart and kill children mocking a bald man?
Balaam's ass spoke to him?
16
Pingu's climate theory is WILD speculation. 

No it isn't. It's backed up by hard science.

Quote
At least mine has some footing in reality.

Your reality.
17
But no substantial response to my post.
So I read it, your turn.
It should be clear to you what I think without a summary, but okay. I think that North Africa was green and lush soon after the single Ice Age which occurred soon after the global flood. But the article I referenced puts this green and lush period - the pastoral period - between 7000 and 3000 BC. Okay fine. What's a few thousand years among friends? The important thing that we glean from this article is that it was definitely green and Lush complete with grazing herds less than 10,000 years ago, then it dried out. And of course the question is why. I already explained to you that all we can do is make informed speculation based on what we know now about desertification. I posted a study about the Mongolian steppe and how it is becoming a desert due to over grazing. Therefore we can make a somewhat informed speculation that perhaps it was the same reason that caused desertification in North Africa. This speculation is further strengthened by the fact that thanks to Allan Savory We Now understand the specifics of how mismanagement of grazing herds causes deserts and how proper management of those same size herds or even larger herds actually reverses desertification.

OR - overgrazing had little or nothing to do with the desertification process, but was a result of the elements Pingu identified earlier, and as outlined in this article:

Quote
The CLIMBER-2 models showed that feedbacks within the climate and vegetation systems were the major cause of Saharan desertification, building rapidly upon the effects of the initial orbital changes. The model suggests that land use practices of humans who lived in and cultivated the Sahara, were not significant causes of the desertification.
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/07/990712080500.htm

Now, as to the Mongolian Steppe, overgrazing is the problem, but let's look at some numbers:

Quote
Overgrazing accounts for about 80 percent of the vegetation loss in recent years, researchers concluded, and reduced precipitation as a result of climatic change accounted for most of the rest. These combined forces have led to desertification as once-productive grasslands are overtaken by the Gobi Desert, expanding rapidly from the south.
Since 1990 livestock numbers have almost doubled to 45 million animals, caused in part by the socioeconomic changes linked to the breakup of the former Soviet Union, the report said. High unemployment led many people back to domestic herding.
Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2013-09-overgrazing-mongolian-steppe.html#jCp

45 million animals.

Keep in mind that the highest estimate of the entire world human population during the Pastoral period in North Africa is 10 million, and the low estimate is 1 million.

Even at the high estimate, that's 35 million more animals on the Steppe today than there were people in the whole world at the time Dave thinks 'overgrazing' was occurring in North Africa.

There's very little chance that the small herding population in the area at the time could possibly have been grazing enough animals to denude the entire area of forage.
18
Politics and Current Events / Re: Trumpocalypse
We are not going to give you another starter population of Bald Eagles if y'all fuck up their environment with pesticides etc. again. ~ Canada.
19
I was in Haarlem for only a few weeks before a Welsh guy who was supplementing his income by repairing bikes asked me why I had no bike. When I said I couldn't afford one, he rolled his eyes and several days later presented me with a dumped bike (abandoned in the street with obvious issues) he'd refurbished for me. An awesome gift.

Previously I'd experienced my first ride home on a bike carrier - I didn't even think that was possible, but those big heavy street bikes could carry an elephant.
20
I'm a bit leery of cattle, having had an unfortunate run-in with one as a child, but their love of music is very endearing.

When we were on our honeymoon in fact, my new husband was trying to learn flute (in fact it was his new-found interest in music that had led him to be interested in a music student....) and so practiced it at every opportunity.  One time we stopped to have a picnic in a layby by a field of cows, and he got out his flute, and of course the cows all gathered at the fence to listen. He was highly amused (as his technique wasn't great by then and he only knew a few tunes) but didn't really believe that they'd come to listen to him.  He thought they were just curious about people.  So he stopped, and they started to wander off.  Then he started again to see what would happen (being a scientist at heart, controlled experiment and all) and they positively tripped over each other to get back to the fence.

I'm sure I've told this story before, so apologies.  But they really do like music. So odd and so touching.

I remember it. :)

I have a good deal of respect for cows myself, as should anyone, They're big, and respond to threats in sometimes quite violent and occasionally fatal ways. One of my uncle's cows was very mean and used to chase us. And bulls - I spent my fair share of time up trees yelling for my cousins to come get their bull, who I'd swear found it amusing to tree us kids when he got loose, which was often.
21
I chose this old photo for an example. It's taken near Margaree Harbour, in the Margaree Valley in Cape Breton. Most of the mountain-side you can see was cleared by one Acadian man using a draft horse and stone sledge, a feat of which he was very proud. He and his wife had 21 children. None of them cared to take over the farm, though, and much of the cleared area is now reverting to woods, which is fine.

Judging from the girl's clothing, I think the photo is from early 50s or even late 40s.


That's likely post 1963 or 4 judging by the color. Maybe up to 1970s

Perhaps. But I doubt it. I think it's poorly processed or deteriorated, which accounts for the fuzzy texture and strong yellow tone. There are family photos back home from that time period which look very like that today.

The style of the girl's outfit, the high waist, tight over hips, open collar loose blouse, was typical right up to around 1960. By 1963 I was laughed at for wearing such 1950s hand-me-downs to school.
22
<snip>
As has been discussed to nauseum, Bluffy has not provided any evidence that bunching will be effective and there's been a lot of material posted indicating it is not. There goes a third of Bluffy's mantra.

Also there's the solid beefy evidence of the thousands of successful farmers whose pastures are not deteriorating despite the fact that they don't spend every day stressing their cattle by forcing them into tight miserable mobs. As usual, Dave's (and his gurus') ideas of livestock management pretend to be 'working with nature' when in fact they just manufacture their own notions and mostly work in direct opposition to what really is natural behaviour and natural landscapes. Not that trad farming is always any better, but at least they mostly let the cows act like cows.
23
Lol! I once mentioned to a Dutch guy that in a Canadian city there's likely be walls or fences along at least some canals, to prevent people falling in, to which he blandly replied that the Dutch considered that if you fell into a canal, your drowning likely improved the general IQ of the country.

Of course, most of those are likely dumped old bicycles, rather than sad accidents.
24
I chose this old photo for an example. It's taken near Margaree Harbour, in the Margaree Valley in Cape Breton. Most of the mountain-side you can see was cleared by one Acadian man using a draft horse and stone sledge, a feat of which he was very proud. He and his wife had 21 children. None of them cared to take over the farm, though, and much of the cleared area is now reverting to woods, which is fine.

Judging from the girl's clothing, I think the photo is from early 50s or even late 40s.

25
Rumour has it that Trump is furious because the government shutdown, much to his surprise, may prevent him from flying to maralago-land for the weekend, because Air Force 1 can't fly him there and the secret service can't pay the hotel bill and other presidential protections that require a functioning gov't to work. So he may be stuck in the 'dump' of a white hous for the duration.