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Messages - RAFH

1
And this has ...  what to do with ... whose "head rolling"  ?  :dunno:

Or is this now the official Dave Hawkins Mindlessly Rebroadcasts The Latest From The Conservative Play Pen thread?
This is "ever hopeful Dave" hoping that the Darwin debased Minds here will one day wake up and realize how stupid they have been in their assessment of Donald Trump.
My assessment of Donald Trump is capable of allowing that he may not be a total failure in everything he touches. Particularly regarding Korea.  That doesn't make him anything like a good thing. Also, all you've done is posted an infographic with a hypothesis.
Good then you're only mostly stupid, not completely and hopelessly stupid.  There's Hope for you.
But none whatsoever for you, Bluffy, none whatsoever.
2
After death, you can remain an xian forever.
3
And this has ...  what to do with ... whose "head rolling"  ?  :dunno:

Or is this now the official Dave Hawkins Mindlessly Rebroadcasts The Latest From The Conservative Play Pen thread?
This is "ever hopeful Dave" hoping that the Darwin debased Minds here will one day wake up and realize how stupid they have been in their assessment of Donald Trump.
And fearing they are right.

Especially after he realizes nothing about evolution or darwin has anything to do with their assessment of Trump.
4
And this has ...  what to do with ... whose "head rolling"  ?  :dunno:

Or is this now the official Dave Hawkins Mindlessly Rebroadcasts The Latest From The Conservative Play Pen thread?
Well, sort of, for certain davinitions. More generally it's the Bluffy's Bonafide 100% Grass-Fed Bullgoatshit Thread.
5
Also, where besides TR can I find people interested in - and willing to post about - the huge diversity of topics that I like - everything from pyramids to bacteria?
The number of people who respond to your threads is tapering down.  Wonder why?
Bluffy is, for most people, an acquired taste. Acquired and refined. It takes work to appreciate. Unfortunately, even a reservoir like Bluffy can and probably will run dry.
6
Philosophy / Re: Exemplarist Moral Theory
The "meaning" of historic peoples is only as good as the sources used.

Those who control the past control the future.
Those who control the present control the past.
Yes, but, those that control the future control the present.
7
There are sites along the Nile. Is there anything published that proposes that the line from Omo 1 went northward to those sites?


I have seen nothing published on this subject.
Mind you, there is this:

Quote
There is some evidence for the argument that modern humans left Africa at least 125,000 years ago using two different routes: through the Nile Valley heading to the Middle East, at least into modern Israel (Qafzeh: 120,000-100,000 years ago)
Quote
Northern route
Some of the earliest remains of AMH anywhere outside of Africa, the Skhul and Qafzeh hominins, were found in the Levant (present-day Israel) and dated to 120 and 100-90 kya, respectively (Fig. 1).56,57 It has been suggested that these fossils represent an early exit of modern humans approximately 120 kya, traveling across the Sinai Peninsula to the Levant.58 The next human remains found in the region include the Manot1 cranium, which was dated to around 55 kya,59 demonstrating a considerable gap in the fossil record of AMH occupation in the Levant. This, in conjunction with climatic records, indicating a global glacial period 90 kya,60 has led some authors to suggest that if the first humans did exit early via the Levant they did not survive, and that the Skhul and Qafzeh hominins are the remnants of this failed exodus.58 Other authors emphasize the possibility that this group could have already left the Levant before the glacial period 90 kya.61 That said, the recent presentation of archeological material, primarily stone tools and assemblages dated to 100-80 kya, from an empty corner of the Arabian Peninsula suggests early settlements may have been widely distributed and that even if Skhul and Qafzeh do represent a failed exodus, it was broader and more complex than previously thought.62

In addition to the evidence from the archeological and climatic record, genetic studies have also suggested some support for a Northern route. A study of Y chromosome haplogroup distributions together with 10 microsatellite loci and 45 binary markers in different African and Near Eastern populations found that the Levant was the most supported route for the primary migratory movements between Africa and Eurasia.63 In a more recent paper, Pagani et al sequenced the genomes of 100 Egyptians and 125 individuals from five Ethiopian ethnic groups (Amhara, Oromo, Ethiopian Somali, Wolayta, and Gumuz).64 After attempting to mask West Eurasian genetic components inherited via recent non-African admixture within the last 4 kya, they showed that modern non-African haplotypes were more similar to Egyptian haplotypes than to Ethiopian haplotypes, thus suggesting that Egypt was the more likely route in the exodus out of Africa migration, assuming the efficacy of their masking procedure. However, as noted earlier, one limitation of such studies that analyze modern DNA is that extant populations may not be good representatives of past populations due to factors such as population replacement, migrations, admixture, and drift.
We saw earlier that the Nile sites are younger (closer to today) than the sites in the Levant.
So if the line led from Omo 1 to the Nile sites and then to the Levant it was by means of a time travel machine.

It may be that people did not understand this.
The Out of Africa gives no details about the migration into the Levant. Though it does say this:
Quote
There is some evidence for the argument that modern humans left Africa at least 125,000 years ago using two different routes: through the Nile Valley heading to the Middle East, at least into modern Israel (Qafzeh: 120,000-100,000 years ago)
If they did give details they would document that the Nile sites were closer to today than the sites in the Levant. That would contradict the idea of an Out of Africa migration.

It is hard for folks to acknowledge these simple facts. You begin immediately with the "yes but" excuses. It is hard for you to admit facts that are staring you in the face.
The researchers in this field have never come to terms with the Levant fossils and sites. They just wave their hands and say something like:
Quote
There is some evidence for the argument that modern humans left Africa at least 125,000 years ago using two different routes: through the Nile Valley heading to the Middle East, at least into modern Israel (Qafzeh: 120,000-100,000 years ago)
They never deal with how humans actually made it out of Africa to the Levant. They just say that it happened. But as we have seen from the dating of the Nile sites, that does not stand up.
Well that is that. The Out of Africa theory does not stand up. You folks can continue your "yes but" excuses and insults.
Has the Out of the Middle East Theory detail how humans actually made it out of the Middle East? I am hoping for a daily diary, actually several would be more desirable so I could compare and contrast the various points of view and attitude. Or does the single proponent of OoME say that it just happened? Because as we've seen mentioned, there is little to nothing that establishes the technology found at the Egyptian/Nile sites derived directly from the ME much less establish any sort of lineage connection between the two populations.
8
What "details" do you think the Out of Africa theory should give?
What details do any competing theories offer* ?

* in peer-reviewed publications, of course. Not some Dunning-Kruger crackpot on the internet.
Worth repeating.
Till it sinks in.
It will never sink in, I tell you, NEVER!
9
Also the helium/zircon research program.
And one can't forget the mouse endotoxin nor the turkey guts.
Then again, Bluffy does have some high aspirations so it's possible his history of either non-starts or gave ups or utter failures is simply an artifact of being so interested in so many things.
10
Also the helium/zircon research program.
And one can't forget the mouse endotoxin nor the turkey guts.
11
There are sites along the Nile. Is there anything published that proposes that the line from Omo 1 went northward to those sites?


I have seen nothing published on this subject.
Mind you, there is this:

Quote
There is some evidence for the argument that modern humans left Africa at least 125,000 years ago using two different routes: through the Nile Valley heading to the Middle East, at least into modern Israel (Qafzeh: 120,000-100,000 years ago)
Quote
Northern route
Some of the earliest remains of AMH anywhere outside of Africa, the Skhul and Qafzeh hominins, were found in the Levant (present-day Israel) and dated to 120 and 100-90 kya, respectively (Fig. 1).56,57 It has been suggested that these fossils represent an early exit of modern humans approximately 120 kya, traveling across the Sinai Peninsula to the Levant.58 The next human remains found in the region include the Manot1 cranium, which was dated to around 55 kya,59 demonstrating a considerable gap in the fossil record of AMH occupation in the Levant. This, in conjunction with climatic records, indicating a global glacial period 90 kya,60 has led some authors to suggest that if the first humans did exit early via the Levant they did not survive, and that the Skhul and Qafzeh hominins are the remnants of this failed exodus.58 Other authors emphasize the possibility that this group could have already left the Levant before the glacial period 90 kya.61 That said, the recent presentation of archeological material, primarily stone tools and assemblages dated to 100-80 kya, from an empty corner of the Arabian Peninsula suggests early settlements may have been widely distributed and that even if Skhul and Qafzeh do represent a failed exodus, it was broader and more complex than previously thought.62

In addition to the evidence from the archeological and climatic record, genetic studies have also suggested some support for a Northern route. A study of Y chromosome haplogroup distributions together with 10 microsatellite loci and 45 binary markers in different African and Near Eastern populations found that the Levant was the most supported route for the primary migratory movements between Africa and Eurasia.63 In a more recent paper, Pagani et al sequenced the genomes of 100 Egyptians and 125 individuals from five Ethiopian ethnic groups (Amhara, Oromo, Ethiopian Somali, Wolayta, and Gumuz).64 After attempting to mask West Eurasian genetic components inherited via recent non-African admixture within the last 4 kya, they showed that modern non-African haplotypes were more similar to Egyptian haplotypes than to Ethiopian haplotypes, thus suggesting that Egypt was the more likely route in the exodus out of Africa migration, assuming the efficacy of their masking procedure. However, as noted earlier, one limitation of such studies that analyze modern DNA is that extant populations may not be good representatives of past populations due to factors such as population replacement, migrations, admixture, and drift.
We saw earlier that the Nile sites are younger (closer to today) than the sites in the Levant.
So if the line led from Omo 1 to the Nile sites and then to the Levant it was by means of a time travel machine.

It may be that people did not understand this.
The Out of Africa gives no details about the migration into the Levant. Though it does say this:
Quote
There is some evidence for the argument that modern humans left Africa at least 125,000 years ago using two different routes: through the Nile Valley heading to the Middle East, at least into modern Israel (Qafzeh: 120,000-100,000 years ago)
If they did give details they would document that the Nile sites were closer to today than the sites in the Levant. That would contradict the idea of an Out of Africa migration.

No, it would not.
First off, you are assuming linearity in the finds, that's not necessarily the case and probably not the case.
Not everything has been rendered into fosssils or otherwise archeological finds. Probably 99% of everything that's occurred will never be known. It's perfectly possible there were migrations by humans out of NE Africa for a very long time. H erectus made it all the way to eastern Indonesia close to 1Mya. But those lineages pretty much died out, leaving, at best, minor introgressions into the modern human genome.
Secondly, you ignore or reinterpret any evidence that refutes your personal fantasy. Not very scientific. But then, you don't have any relevant scientific education, training and/or experience, you're just an internet crackpot nutjob crank.
12
Okay let me back up. Yes I am too lazy to read the indictment myself. I appreciate those who read it for me and give me the cliff notes. Were or were not manafort and Gates indicted for doing work for Donald Trump? That was the interesting part of that tweet to me.
Really?
Up till now you thought they were indicted "for doing work for Donald Trump"?
Why did you think that?

no kidding. Because, if they had been, your continued support of Trump while you assumed that is pretty clearly based on not evidence.
Yeah really. It make me think that Dave has completely missed the point of Mueller's investigation.
Missing points is one of Bluffy's strong points.
13
I am in fact a scientist and understand evolution better than most folks here. But not worth arguing. Just another silly slur from you folks.

Ok this has to be some kind of performance art.
I hope so. It's preferable to thinking this is what a person is actually like.
Dreaming of how reality should be instead of simply learning how it is is the basis of everything sucky does. Ditto for Bluffy.
sucky really is actually just like that. And proud of it too.
14
In any case, the fact remains that RAFH'S questions this morning are interesting to me and they are good questions.

One question he asked was who will take care of the animal operation here in Missouri while I am off in Guyana? Lots of possibilities for that given that it's really easy to maintain, but here's one really radical possibility that would be a real hoot if I could pull it off.

Increase the size of the flock to say 20 Dairy goats and 20 sheep, or maybe even 50 and 50.  Announce a  Guinness Book of World Records Expedition with the goal of being the longest ever overland round trip with a flock of sheep and goats with the goal being travel on foot with the sheep and goats all the way from my location to the village in southern Guyana.

Over land.

On foot.

Maybe it would be better with all Dairy goats and no sheep because then you would have excess food on a daily basis to trade for other food items all along the way and then when you arrived in Guyana, you could trade some of the goats for sheep for your starter flock.

I think the only way this would work would be to publicize it heavily so that you could get cooperation from local authorities in the various countries, not to mention cooperation from landowners to allow the flocks to graze along the way. And even then it might be impossible without some big name sponsor like Jeff Bezos or Richard Branson.

Go for it! Have fun in Darien!
There's an interesting story of an ex-SAS paratrooper who decided to walk from Tierra del Fuego to London. He had made it to Russia somewhere last time I checked, but is hampered by visa complications. Just showing up having walked across from Alaska makes Russian immigration a bit jumpy. His experiences in Darien were a bit hair-raising. Have fun Dave.
For reference - the name is Karl Bushby.
There's a great vlog called Hasta Alaska about a Brit that drove a VW Kombi he modified from Chile to Prudhoe Bay Alaska and then back down to the tip of Baja and then back to LA where he transferred it to a new owner (who won the free lottery for the Kombi, and then he and his gal traveled with the new owner for another 6 months across the US. From Chile to Alaska took about 5 years, but one year of that was dealing with the Kombi having caught fire and needing rebuilt and then needing a new transmission and then problems with getting back into the US because he didn't have any fixed address for the previous five years and didn't have a job. 

They did not attempt the Darien. Ditto with a pair of newly wed cyclists who rode from Vancouver BC to as far south as you can go. Great story. But they also skipped the Darien.
15
Ok whatever.
The classic Dave Hawkins response to any suggestion that he should engage in any kind of self-analysis.

That or "LOL."

Or if it's a woman suggesting it, accusations of manipulative bitchery.
I don't see how anyone can blame Bluffy for not wanting to do self-analysis. I mean, would you want Bluffy analyzing you?
16
"You know what virtually guarantees that you won't become a true hero like those guys? Comparing yourself to those guys."

Nope.

Comparing ourselves to people like this is good because it makes us realize how far short of their standard we fall.  I am not even close to the level of self-sacrifice and love for others that I see in the life of Jesus and the life of Gandhi, but I do see progress in my life. I certainly am closer to being like them in these ways than I was say 10 years ago.

But how does being a right cunt have anything to do with being like Jesus or Gandhi?
You're not a left cunt.
17
I've gotten my fair share of hilarity from socrates, but a blatant "I'm better than you all so nyah!" takes the cake.
I hope sucky realizes he's going to have to fight Bluffy for the Title of Greatest Scientist of All Time as well as for The BRILLIANCE CUP. I have a feeling Bluffy is in much better shape than sucky, should win hands down. All that 100% raw goat's milk.
18
Quote
We generated 225 whole-genome sequences (225 at 8× depth, of which 8 were increased to 30×; Illumina HiSeq 2000) from six modern Northeast African populations (100 Egyptians and five Ethiopian populations each represented by 25 individuals). West Eurasian components were masked out, and the remaining African haplotypes were compared with a panel of sub-Saharan African and non-African genomes. We showed that masked Northeast African haplotypes overall were more similar to non-African haplotypes and more frequently present outside Africa than were any sets of haplotypes derived from a West African population. Furthermore, the masked Egyptian haplotypes showed these properties more markedly than the masked Ethiopian haplotypes, pointing to Egypt as the more likely gateway in the exodus to the rest of the world. Using five Ethiopian and three Egyptian high-coverage masked genomes and the multiple sequentially Markovian coalescent (MSMC) approach, we estimated the genetic split times of Egyptians and Ethiopians from non-African populations at 55,000 and 65,000 years ago, respectively, whereas that of West Africans was estimated to be 75,000 years ago. Both the haplotype and MSMC analyses thus suggest a predominant northern route out of Africa via Egypt.

The bolded part supports a migration from the Levant
Gee, I wonder why NE African haplotypes show up more frequently and are more similar to non-African haplotypes than W African haplotypes. I wonder if the the distance from the NE Africa, say Cairo area, to the Levant, say Jerusalem, some 160 km vs the distance from West Africa, say Monrovia, to Jerusalem, some 5300 km, has anything to do with it? And maybe it isn't just the distance, but that the Sahara desert occupies most of that distance from West Africa to Jerusalem adds to the difficulty of making that journey?
19
James Comey Sees Himself As A Victim Of Trump. He Refuses To See The Victims Of The Justice System.

Quote
Like Kelly, Comey frames his blinkered nostalgia as public virtue, and he's largely succeeding: His book has been lavishly and warmly received. Comey is certainly right about the danger of Trump, but that doesn't mean he's right about other things. For instance, he shows minimal concern for the police killings of black men and the protest movement that's grown out of them. He seems unable to believe that poor and minority communities have a fair case against the way law enforcement has been practiced on them.

In a short chapter on racial injustice, Comey describes the killings of Eric Garner, Tamir Rice, Walter Scott, and Freddie Gray as "tragic deaths." But he turns the killings around, lamenting that they "dominated perceptions of the police. They swamped and overshadowed millions of positive, professional encounters between citizens and police officers, and extraordinary anger was building toward all uniformed law enforcement." Yes, Comey really went there -- blaming the victims of police abuse for making people upset that police were abusing them.

Comey did not hide these views while at the FBI, and after making a speech in Chicago in 2015 that was not well received by the civil rights community, he was summoned to the Oval Office by then-President Barack Obama. Comey describes that session in his book, and he seemed to double down, telling the country's first black president that the law enforcement community was upset at the way Obama had used the phrase "mass incarceration." It was offensive, Comey told the president.

"I thought the term was both inaccurate and insulting to a lot of good people in law enforcement who cared deeply about helping people trapped in dangerous neighborhoods," Comey writes. "It was inaccurate in the sense that there was nothing 'mass' about the incarceration: every defendant was charged individually, represented individually by counsel, convicted by a court individually, sentenced individually, reviewed on appeal individually, and incarcerated. That added up to a lot of people in jail, but there was nothing 'mass' about it."
When a country has one of the highest rates of incarceration for non-political offenses in the world, including countries that are seriously authoritarian, mass incarceration is an entirely appropriate term to use. When that incarceration is grossly biased towards minorities and the poor, it's doubly appropriate.
20
I've come to realize over time that I cannot "expect" anything from this crowd.  But I enjoy posting here for a variety of reasons and sometimes I do get good suggestions and sometimes hit on some interesting discussions. I do expect that my practices will help the YY and I hope to launch a project there at some point.


Just myself Dave, but every time that you ask for an argument for your ideas I think that you are trying to scam a new audience.

Like now for your Wai Wai project.  You need to convince someone to let you be involved ( and to profit from) some involvement in a government project.  So are you hoping to recruit some people to advise/request/cajole your involvement in some goat project?  What will be you consultants fee?  You being the world's foremost expert in this field.  That is true, correct

What you are not ?  Then why are they paying one red cent?


This is an interesting post to me and I suspect it would be interesting to uncool as well because it provides an opportunity to explore how and why people arrive at certain ideas. Why would anyone think that I'm trying to gain financially from the y y project? Certainly not from anything I have written. Am I one of those lazy white colonialists that wants to build a mansion and have the brown people serve me? No and my life for at least the past four years proves that I'm not one of those types.

So Rick, read carefully what I'm about to write. If I ever manage to do anything in the why why Village it would be something along the following lines... purchase a starter herd of dairy goats and hair sheep in country and set up a rotational grazing system at the y y Village. Build myself a jungle house and live on site for at least one year to work the bugs out of the system. This system has the capacity to produce a maximum of about 2.7 million food calories per year of which I myself might consume a quarter of that, leaving the rest for others who want to be involved in the project. It could also produce a max of 40 baby animals per year driving flock growth.  2 dairy goats plus 2 sheep per villager would be a good initial target for total village flock size.  So 400 dairy goats plus 400 ewes would be my target.  In theory, this would require about 400 Acres, i.e. less than 1/10 of 1% of the entire reservation acreage if I'm doing my math correctly.
Bluffy, I don't think anyone here is suggesting you're expecting to get rich, at least monetarily. Nor live in a big mansion with lots of coloreds to serve you. No, it's your ego that you want to feed, your hero fantasy. You want to be that hero that saves the world. And that's what's objectionable, at least to me, that you are promoting bullshit because you believe you are that hero and you've got the answers and so it's all good, right?

And, no, your life over the past few years has not proved you're "not that type". All your life over the past few years has shown is you've experienced various changes in your life. Finances, job, family, etc.

There's questions with the above scenario you describe:
Who is paying your travel expenses?
What are you going to do with your current setup? The hovel, the robocage, the goats and sheep and chickens and whatever for the year or more that you are in Guyana?
Who is going to provide the cash for your starter flerd?
How much land and what condition would it be in for your starter pasture? Will it be previously slashed and burnt? Former casava fields? Previous village clearing? Virgin tropical rainforest?

And you still have not acknowledged that it's not so much whether or not the goats and sheep can survive in a tropical rainforest but what sort of effects the goats and sheep and their entire required biosphere will have on the tropical rainforest. Given the high temperatures and humidity, the substantial rainfall and the poor soils, I have doubts about how well the goats and sheep will do, but even greater doubts about how the rainforest will do. And it's not just your starter flerd of maybe 400 acres, but according to you, there are many more Wai - Wai, maybe 4000 in all, which means 4000 acres, 0.4% of the preserve. I'm a bit doubtful of your figure of 1 acre per person, after all, you aren't even feeding yourself with 10 acres of prime animal farming land. There's also the whole issue of burning out the land, as has been noted many times, the fertility of tropical rainforests is in the canopy, not the soils. Remove the canopy and you're left with soils that are rapidly depleted. The is a fact as has been shown in the neighboring Amazon basin, where cattle ranchers slash and burn a parcel of land, use it up in a couple years and move on.

Then there is the whole issue of setting precedence. Hey, if you can ranch 4000 acres, why not 40,000? Or 400,000? It'd be you that opened the Pandora's box for MegaEvilFood Corp and it's subsidiary, RainforestRapers, Inc. And the end of Wai Wai life.

I also wonder if the Wai Wai have any tradition of farming animals. If they do not, then introducing such is going to be an enormous cultural change for them. And not necessarily for the better.
21
Or just after getting back to Glen about the spider tracks.
Actually, I believe it was worms, not spiders.
22
That would be a good idea, yes. You could even do so now, in preparation for next year. Mark any information you think necessary - probably the date and time you take the photo.

It would be good to know surrounding circumstances: how did the two years differ in terms of things known to affect growth? Average temperature, precipitation, latest frost, etc.

A really good scientist would take note of two spots: one managed by HMG, one managed by some standard method (e.g. leaving it fallow), and compare the improvement of the two spots. To some extent, this would allow you to bypass the second step, because those factors would be the same for the two spots.
I would suggest two sets of spots, say 5 each, randomly chosen, but it'd be nice if they were in pairs with one grazed and the other close by not grazed. Maybe 5' apart. That would help reduce the potential for dissimilar soil and environmental conditions.
23
If I was really a good scientist, I guess I would put an orange Flag by the spot in the first set of pictures so I could take a picture next year at the exact same spot.
Yes, that's exactly what a good scientist would do.
That you didn't is just another aspect of you not being a scientist at all.
24
There are sites along the Nile. Is there anything published that proposes that the line from Omo 1 went northward to those sites?


I have seen nothing published on this subject.
Mind you, there is this:

Quote
There is some evidence for the argument that modern humans left Africa at least 125,000 years ago using two different routes: through the Nile Valley heading to the Middle East, at least into modern Israel (Qafzeh: 120,000-100,000 years ago)
Quote
Northern route
Some of the earliest remains of AMH anywhere outside of Africa, the Skhul and Qafzeh hominins, were found in the Levant (present-day Israel) and dated to 120 and 100-90 kya, respectively (Fig. 1).56,57 It has been suggested that these fossils represent an early exit of modern humans approximately 120 kya, traveling across the Sinai Peninsula to the Levant.58 The next human remains found in the region include the Manot1 cranium, which was dated to around 55 kya,59 demonstrating a considerable gap in the fossil record of AMH occupation in the Levant. This, in conjunction with climatic records, indicating a global glacial period 90 kya,60 has led some authors to suggest that if the first humans did exit early via the Levant they did not survive, and that the Skhul and Qafzeh hominins are the remnants of this failed exodus.58 Other authors emphasize the possibility that this group could have already left the Levant before the glacial period 90 kya.61 That said, the recent presentation of archeological material, primarily stone tools and assemblages dated to 100-80 kya, from an empty corner of the Arabian Peninsula suggests early settlements may have been widely distributed and that even if Skhul and Qafzeh do represent a failed exodus, it was broader and more complex than previously thought.62

In addition to the evidence from the archeological and climatic record, genetic studies have also suggested some support for a Northern route. A study of Y chromosome haplogroup distributions together with 10 microsatellite loci and 45 binary markers in different African and Near Eastern populations found that the Levant was the most supported route for the primary migratory movements between Africa and Eurasia.63 In a more recent paper, Pagani et al sequenced the genomes of 100 Egyptians and 125 individuals from five Ethiopian ethnic groups (Amhara, Oromo, Ethiopian Somali, Wolayta, and Gumuz).64 After attempting to mask West Eurasian genetic components inherited via recent non-African admixture within the last 4 kya, they showed that modern non-African haplotypes were more similar to Egyptian haplotypes than to Ethiopian haplotypes, thus suggesting that Egypt was the more likely route in the exodus out of Africa migration, assuming the efficacy of their masking procedure. However, as noted earlier, one limitation of such studies that analyze modern DNA is that extant populations may not be good representatives of past populations due to factors such as population replacement, migrations, admixture, and drift.
We saw earlier that the Nile sites are younger (closer to today) than the sites in the Levant.
So if the line led from Omo 1 to the Nile sites and then to the Levant it was by means of a time travel machine.

The evidence supports the idea that the migration was from the Levant into Egypt.
For Omo 1 to be an ancestor requires re-dating all the Nile sites and the Levant sites. Compare that with the idea that Omo 1 has been incorrectly dated.
No, it does not. You are still operating under the notion there was one and only one migration. That's false, there were a number of migrations, some earlier, some later, some big, some small, some stayed, some moved on and some went back.

And no, Omo 1 does not require re-dating all the Nile and Levant sites, unless one assumes a single migration that went from Ethiopia to Egypt to the Levant (your take on OoA) or to the Levant and then to Egypt (sort of your "theory").

If one assumes, based on the available evidence, there were a number of migrations, those problems disappear.
25
Whatever the hell that's supposed to mean.
I'm guessing Hawkins is just parroting some words he heard in the Play Pen, without having a clue what they mean.
Nor, particularly, cares.
His mentors said it,
he believes it.