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  • meepmeep
  • Administrator
  • zombiecat queen
Donald Trump Didn’t Want to Be President
This modified excerpt from Michael Wolff's book is a fucking doozy:

http://nymag.com/daily/intelligencer/2018/01/michael-wolff-fire-and-fury-book-donald-trump.html

Quote
Most presidential candidates spend their entire careers, if not their lives from adolescence, preparing for the role. They rise up the ladder of elected offices, perfect a public face, and prepare themselves to win and to govern. The Trump calculation, quite a conscious one, was different. The candidate and his top lieutenants believed they could get all the benefits of almost becoming president without having to change their behavior or their worldview one whit. Almost everybody on the Trump team, in fact, came with the kind of messy conflicts bound to bite a president once he was in office. Michael Flynn, the retired general who served as Trump's opening act at campaign rallies, had been told by his friends that it had not been a good idea to take $45,000 from the Russians for a speech. "Well, it would only be a problem if we won," ­Flynn assured them.

lololol how'd that work out for you buddy?

Quote
Not only did Trump disregard the potential conflicts of his own business deals and real-estate holdings, he audaciously refused to release his tax returns. Why should he? Once he lost, Trump would be both insanely famous and a martyr to Crooked Hillary. His daughter Ivanka and son-in-law Jared would be international celebrities. Steve Bannon would become the de facto head of the tea-party movement. Kellyanne Conway would be a cable-news star. Melania Trump, who had been assured by her husband that he wouldn't become president, could return to inconspicuously lunching. Losing would work out for everybody. Losing was winning.

Shortly after 8 p.m. on Election Night, when the unexpected trend -- Trump might actually win -- seemed confirmed, Don Jr. told a friend that his father, or DJT, as he calls him, looked as if he had seen a ghost. Melania was in tears--and not of joy.

There was, in the space of little more than an hour, in Steve Bannon's not unamused observation, a befuddled Trump morphing into a disbelieving Trump and then into a horrified Trump. But still to come was the final transformation: Suddenly, Donald Trump became a man who believed that he deserved to be, and was wholly capable of being, the president of the United States.

Ann Coulter making sense here:
Quote
As much as the president himself, the chief of staff determines how the Executive branch -- which employs 4 million people -- will run. The job has been construed as deputy president, or even prime minister. But Trump had no interest in appointing a strong chief of staff with a deep knowledge of Washington. Among his early choices for the job was Kushner -- a man with no political experience beyond his role as a calm and flattering body man to Trump during the campaign.

It was Ann Coulter who finally took the president-elect aside. "Nobody is apparently telling you this," she told him. "But you can't. You just can't hire your children."

Quote
"He's a bomb thrower," said Ailes. "And a strange little fucker. But you need him. Who else is good on Israel? Flynn is a little nutty on Iran. Tillerson just knows oil."

"Bolton's mustache is a problem," snorted Bannon. "Trump doesn't think he looks the part. You know Bolton is an acquired taste."

"Well, he got in trouble because he got in a fight in a hotel one night and chased some woman."

"If I told Trump that," Bannon said slyly, "he might have the job."

I refuse to believe this is a real thing that happened but it probably is!:
Quote
After Jared and Ivanka joined them for lunch, Trump continued to cast for positive impressions of his first week. Scarborough praised the president for having invited leaders of the steel unions to the White House. At which point Jared interjected that reaching out to unions, a Democratic constituency, was Bannon's doing, that this was "the Bannon way."

"Bannon?" said the president, jumping on his son-in-law. "That wasn't Bannon's idea. That was my idea. It's the Trump way, not the Bannon way."

Kushner, going concave, retreated from the discussion.

Trump, changing the topic, said to Scarborough and Brzezinski, "So what about you guys? What's going on?" He was referencing their not-so-secret secret relationship. The couple said it was still complicated, but good.

"You guys should just get married," prodded Trump.

"I can marry you! I'm an internet Unitarian minister," Kushner, otherwise an Orthodox Jew, said suddenly.

"What?" said the president. "What are you talking about? Why would they want you to marry them when I could marry them? When they could be married by the president! At Mar-a-Lago!"

The secret of the hair is revealed:
Quote
Ivanka maintained a relationship with her father that was in no way conventional. She was a helper not just in his business dealings, but in his marital realignments. If it wasn't pure opportunism, it was certainly transactional. For Ivanka, it was all business -- building the Trump brand, the presidential campaign, and now the White House. She treated her father with a degree of detachment, even irony, going so far as to make fun of his comb-over to others. She often described the mechanics behind it to friends: an absolutely clean pate -- a contained island after scalp-reduction ­surgery -- surrounded by a furry circle of hair around the sides and front, from which all ends are drawn up to meet in the center and then swept back and secured by a stiffening spray. The color, she would point out to comical effect, was from a product called Just for Men -- the longer it was left on, the darker it got. Impatience resulted in Trump's orange-blond hair color.

President Angry Grandpa:
Quote
Trump, in fact, found the White House to be vexing and even a little scary. He retreated to his own bedroom -- the first time since the Kennedy White House that a presidential couple had maintained separate rooms. In the first days, he ordered two television screens in addition to the one already there, and a lock on the door, precipitating a brief standoff with the Secret Service, who insisted they have access to the room. He ­reprimanded the housekeeping staff for picking up his shirt from the floor: "If my shirt is on the floor, it's because I want it on the floor." Then he imposed a set of new rules: Nobody touch anything, especially not his toothbrush. (He had a longtime fear of being poisoned, one reason why he liked to eat at McDonald's -- nobody knew he was coming and the food was safely premade.) Also, he would let housekeeping know when he wanted his sheets done, and he would strip his own bed.

If he was not having his 6:30 dinner with Steve Bannon, then, more to his liking, he was in bed by that time with a cheeseburger, watching his three screens and making phone calls -- the phone was his true contact point with the world -- to a small group of friends, who charted his rising and falling levels of agitation through the evening and then compared notes with one another.

Or maybe President Toddler is more accurate:
Quote
As soon as the campaign team had stepped into the White House, Walsh saw, it had gone from managing Trump to the expectation of being managed by him. Yet the president, while proposing the most radical departure from governing and policy norms in several generations, had few specific ideas about how to turn his themes and vitriol into policy. And making suggestions to him was deeply complicated. Here, arguably, was the central issue of the Trump presidency, informing every aspect of Trumpian policy and leadership: He didn't process information in any conventional sense. He didn't read. He didn't really even skim. Some believed that for all practical purposes he was no more than semi-­literate. He trusted his own expertise ­-- no matter how paltry or irrelevant -- more than anyone else's. He was often confident, but he was just as often paralyzed, less a savant than a figure of sputtering and dangerous insecurities, whose instinctive response was to lash out and behave as if his gut, however confused, was in fact in some clear and forceful way telling him what to do. It was, said Walsh, "like trying to figure out what a child wants."

This is some fucking amazing 48 dimensional chess here.

Re: Donald Trump Didn’t Want to Be President
Reply #1
Dementia-riddled toddler idiot President is good, way to go America!

  • borealis
  • Administrator
Re: Donald Trump Didn’t Want to Be President
Reply #2
But holy shit, so scary.  :gonk:

  • meepmeep
  • Administrator
  • zombiecat queen
Re: Donald Trump Didn’t Want to Be President
Reply #3
like it's hard to take all of it at face value when the guy's sources are basically all a pack of amoral, lying ratfuckers, and honest to god that bit about Kushner marrying Joe Scarborough and Mika Brzezinski reads like goddamn Andy Borowitz, but if even half of that is more or less accurate, oh my god what has this country done to itself

  • ravenscape
  • Administrator
  • Triggered
Re: Donald Trump Didn’t Want to Be President
Reply #4
like it's hard to take all of it at face value when the guy's sources are basically all a pack of amoral, lying ratfuckers, and honest to god that bit about Kushner marrying Joe Scarborough and Mika Brzezinski reads like goddamn Andy Borowitz, but if even half of that is more or less accurate, oh my god what has this country done to itself the world

  • ksen
Re: Donald Trump Didn’t Want to Be President
Reply #5
I find myself in rare agreement with Trump because I didn't want him to be president either.

  • ksen
Re: Donald Trump Didn’t Want to Be President
Reply #6
This is some fucking amazing 48 dimensional chess here.

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/3619108/posts?page=125#125

Quote
To: dead

>> This dumpster fire is not an example of "winning" in any way <<

Cut it out. Your Nattering Negativism not needed. This stuff is an example of 3-D chess at its finest -- maybe even N-dimensional hyper-chess!

125 posted on 1/3/2018, 2:16:59 PM by Hawthorn

said unironically

  • osmanthus
  • Administrator
  • Fingerer of piglets
Re: Donald Trump Didn’t Want to Be President
Reply #7
Some people just can't admit when they have done something stupid.
Truth is out of style

  • meepmeep
  • Administrator
  • zombiecat queen
Re: Donald Trump Didn’t Want to Be President
Reply #8
Ok, I was trying to take this shit with a grain of salt because some of it really sounds totally outlandish and Wolff has apparently been full of crap in the past and included an author's note about how lots of things he heard from people were totally contradictory, but then this happens:



Quote
In the letter to Bannon, Trump attorney Charles Harder, writes, "You [Bannon] have breached the Agreement by, among other things, communicating with author Michael Wolff about Mr. Trump, his family members, and the Company [the campaign], disclosing Confidential Information to Mr. Wolff, and making disparaging statements and in some cases outright defamatory statements to Mr. Wolff about Mr. Trump, his family members."

In the letter, Trump's attorney says that "remedies for your breach of the agreement include but are not limited to monetary damages" though no dollar amount is disclosed.

I mean like I said, Bannon is a bullshitting ratfucker who lies as much as Trump but this is really bananas. :psyduck:

  • uncool
Re: Donald Trump Didn’t Want to Be President
Reply #9
 Trump might have done so just as an expression of power, not as a direct response to anything necessarily actually said. Maybe too cynical, but it seems like the kind of dick-swinging Trump would do.

  • uncool
Re: Donald Trump Didn’t Want to Be President
Reply #10

  • uncool
Re: Donald Trump Didn’t Want to Be President
Reply #11
On the bright side: from WaPo,
Quote
Bannon has in recent weeks also alienated his main financial backer, Rebekah Mercer, after he told several other major conservative donors that he would be able to count on the Mercers' financial support should he run for president, a person familiar with the conversations said. The person said Mercer now does not plan to financially support Bannon's future projects -- and that she was frustrated by his moves in Alabama and some of his comments in the news media that seemed to stoke unnecessary fights.

  • Monad
Re: Donald Trump Didn’t Want to Be President
Reply #12
Clearly 'business guru' Trump does not have the sense to 'keep your friends close but your enemies closer'

  • uncool
Re: Donald Trump Didn’t Want to Be President
Reply #13

Re: Donald Trump Didn’t Want to Be President
Reply #14

Re: Donald Trump Didn’t Want to Be President
Reply #15
This thread is so disturbing on so many levels.
Love is like a magic penny
 if you hold it tight you won't have any
if you give it away you'll have so many
they'll be rolling all over the floor

  • linus
Re: Donald Trump Didn’t Want to Be President
Reply #16
From PD's link:
Quote
At least nine major law firms had turned down an invitation to represent the president.
lol

Re: Donald Trump Didn’t Want to Be President
Reply #17
I didn't think it was any big secret that the trumpster fire didn't really want the gig.

Re: Donald Trump Didn’t Want to Be President
Reply #18

  • linus
Re: Donald Trump Didn’t Want to Be President
Reply #19
So far it's not going so well for Bannon.
Quote
"I support President Trump and the platform upon which he was elected," Mercer said. "My family and I have not communicated with Steve Bannon in many months and have provided no financial support to his political agenda, nor do we support his recent actions and statements."
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/post-politics/wp/2018/01/04/mercer-issues-rare-public-rebuke-of-former-ally-bannon/

  • el jefe
  • asleep till 2020 or 2024
Re: Donald Trump Didn’t Want to Be President
Reply #20
it strikes me that the more influential members of trumpland recognize the danger of bannon (who is perhaps second only to trump in importance to their movement) taking russia gate seriously and calling the trump tower meeting treasonous.  the flock has been able to remain fact-proof on the topic until now, because they are so reflexive at assuming "fake news" when they hear something they don't want to hear.  but I gather bannon has such "street cred" within the movement that, for many of the little people, the reflex will be interrupted by "wait....  it was bannon who said that?"

so it is important to them to discredit him quickly and thoroughly.  hence the heavy fire he's taking from the mercers, alex jones, etc.

  • meepmeep
  • Administrator
  • zombiecat queen
Re: Donald Trump Didn’t Want to Be President
Reply #21


lol at the president basically threatening someone who wrote a mean book about him

eta



ummm
  • Last Edit: January 04, 2018, 08:44:01 PM by meepmeep

  • osmanthus
  • Administrator
  • Fingerer of piglets
Re: Donald Trump Didn’t Want to Be President
Reply #22
You lot do elect some interesting characters. :popcorn:
Truth is out of style

  • Faid
Re: Donald Trump Didn’t Want to Be President
Reply #23

OK, this BS might work in the script of some soft-core tv-series of the early 90s, but not IRL.
Who even made the rule that we cannot group ducks and fish together for the simple reason that they are both aquatic? If I want to group them that way and it serves my purpose then I can jolly well do it however I want to and it is still a nested hierarchy and you can't tell me that it's not.

  • meepmeep
  • Administrator
  • zombiecat queen
Re: Donald Trump Didn’t Want to Be President
Reply #24

Re: Donald Trump Didn’t Want to Be President
Reply #25
lol

  • osmanthus
  • Administrator
  • Fingerer of piglets
Re: Donald Trump Didn’t Want to Be President
Reply #26
The thing about the "gorilla channel" is that it could so easily be true. If it had happened, it would be perfectly in character with what we know of Trump.
Truth is out of style

  • linus
Re: Donald Trump Didn’t Want to Be President
Reply #27
This is maybe the most shocking revelation so far in the Wolff saga:
Quote
Another concern: Bannonworld worried that while Trump Jr. was a media punch line, he remained highly popular with the deplorables from his many appearances on the campaign trail. In a blood feud with Trump's son, Bannon might actually lose. "The base loves Don Jr.," an adviser said. And, in the early stages of the crisis, the Breitbart audience, Bannon's own constituency since before the president began his campaign, appeared to be siding with Trump.
https://www.vanityfair.com/news/2018/01/did-steve-bannon-talk-himself-out-of-his-own-movement

  • osmanthus
  • Administrator
  • Fingerer of piglets
Re: Donald Trump Didn’t Want to Be President
Reply #28
Not really. Given the base, it makes perfect sense.
Truth is out of style

  • meepmeep
  • Administrator
  • zombiecat queen
Re: Donald Trump Didn’t Want to Be President
Reply #29
The bizarro "like a dog" phrase making a solid comeback here:



  • Faid
Re: Donald Trump Didn’t Want to Be President
Reply #30
Who even made the rule that we cannot group ducks and fish together for the simple reason that they are both aquatic? If I want to group them that way and it serves my purpose then I can jolly well do it however I want to and it is still a nested hierarchy and you can't tell me that it's not.

  • Monad
Re: Donald Trump Didn’t Want to Be President
Reply #31
Bannonarama

  • ravenscape
  • Administrator
  • Triggered
Re: Donald Trump Didn’t Want to Be President
Reply #32
Not sure if this is the right thread, but I find the headline for this video darkly humorous.

https://youtu.be/iRSyuKYM994

  • ravenscape
  • Administrator
  • Triggered
Re: Donald Trump Didn’t Want to Be President
Reply #33
Not sure if this is the right thread, but I find the headline for this video darkly humorous.

https://youtu.be/iRSyuKYM994

"Trump book author responds to government criticism."

Re: Donald Trump Didn’t Want to Be President
Reply #34
Michael Wolff Did What Every Other White House Reporter Is Too Cowardly to Do

https://www.gq.com/story/michael-wolff-white-house-trump-access

Quote
I'm gonna begin this post with the same disclaimer that needs to come with every post about Michael Wolff, which is that Wolff is a fart-sniffer whose credibility is often suspect and who represents the absolute worst of New York media-cocktail-circuit inbreeding. But in a way, it's fitting that our least reliable president could finally find himself undone at the hands of one of our least reliable journalists.

All of Wolff's excerpts from Fire & Fury so far (the book was rushed into stores today) read like jayvee fan fiction. They read like a pilot that Steve Bannon himself wrote, pitched to Hollywood, and had rejected 17 times over. They read, in short, like bullshit. And yet...Wolff has audio. He's got hours upon hours of audio. Not only that, but the book has already caused legitimate upheaval in the administration, opened a permanent rift between President Trump and Bannon, AND it confirms what we have all always known to be true: that the president severely lacks the cognitive ability to do this job, and that he is surrounded at all times by a cadre of enablers, dunces, and outright thieves. As much as I wanna discredit Wolff, he got receipts and, more important, he used them. Wolff got it all. Wolff nailed them.

And look how he did it. He did it by sleazily ingratiating himself with the White House, gaining access, hosting weird private dinners, and then taking full advantage of the administration's basic lack of knowledge about how reporting works. Some of the officials Wolff got on tape claim to be unaware that they were on the record. Wolff denies this, but he's very much up front in the book's intro about the fact that he was able to exploit the incredible "lack of experience" on display here. In other words, Wolff got his book by playing a bunch of naive dopes.

Thank God for that. Wolff has spent this week thoroughly exploiting Trump and his minions the same way they've exploited the cluelessness of others. And he pulled it off because, at long last, there was a reporter out there willing to toss decorum aside and burn bridges the same way Trump does.

Everyone around Donald Trump is too polite to Donald Trump. Democrats, foreign dignitaries, underlings... all of them. And the White House press is perhaps the worst offender. From the media pool playing along with Sarah Sanders during press conferences--conferences where Sanders openly lies and pisses on democracy--to access merchants like Maggie Haberman doling out Trump gossip like so many bread crumbs, too many reporters have been far too deferential to an administration that is brazenly racist, dysfunctional, and corrupt. And for what purpose? It's clear to me that Haberman and the like aren't saving up their chits for just the EXACT right time to bring this Administration down. No, the only end goal of their access is continued access, to preserve it indefinitely so that the copy spigot never gets shut off. They are abiding by traditional wink-wink understandings that have long existed between the government and the press covering it.

But Wolff didn't do that. He did not engage in some endless bullshit access tango. No, Wolff actually USED his access, and extended zero courtesy to Trump on the process, and it's going to pay off for him not just from a book sales standpoint, but from a real journalistic impact. I am utterly sick to death of hearing anonymous reports about people inside the White House "concerned" about the madman currently in charge of everything. These people don't deserve the courtesy of discretion. They don't deserve to dictate the terms of coverage to people. They deserve to be torched.

Trump ascended into power in part because he relied on other people being too nice. It's fun to rampage through the china shop when the china shop owner is standing over there being like, "SIR, that is not how we do things here!" If Trump refuses to abide by the standard (and now useless) "norms" of the presidency--shit, if he doesn't even KNOW them--why should ANYONE in the press adhere to needless norms of their own? They shouldn't, and it appears that Michael Wolff was one of the few people to instinctively grasp that, and I hope more White House insiders follow his lead. Sometimes you need a rat to catch a rat.

Re: Donald Trump Didn’t Want to Be President
Reply #35
That is awesome.
Love is like a magic penny
 if you hold it tight you won't have any
if you give it away you'll have so many
they'll be rolling all over the floor

Re: Donald Trump Didn’t Want to Be President
Reply #36
Folks,

"... a rat to catch a rat."

That's lovely.  :clap:

D.

  • osmanthus
  • Administrator
  • Fingerer of piglets
Re: Donald Trump Didn’t Want to Be President
Reply #37
Great piece. I'll be spamming that around a bit. :cheer:
Truth is out of style

Re: Donald Trump Didn’t Want to Be President
Reply #38
Michael Wolff Did What Every Other White House Reporter Is Too Cowardly to Do

https://www.gq.com/story/michael-wolff-white-house-trump-access

Quote
I'm gonna begin this post with the same disclaimer that needs to come with every post about Michael Wolff, which is that Wolff is a fart-sniffer whose credibility is often suspect and who represents the absolute worst of New York media-cocktail-circuit inbreeding. But in a way, it's fitting that our least reliable president could finally find himself undone at the hands of one of our least reliable journalists.

All of Wolff's excerpts from Fire & Fury so far (the book was rushed into stores today) read like jayvee fan fiction. They read like a pilot that Steve Bannon himself wrote, pitched to Hollywood, and had rejected 17 times over. They read, in short, like bullshit. And yet...Wolff has audio. He's got hours upon hours of audio. Not only that, but the book has already caused legitimate upheaval in the administration, opened a permanent rift between President Trump and Bannon, AND it confirms what we have all always known to be true: that the president severely lacks the cognitive ability to do this job, and that he is surrounded at all times by a cadre of enablers, dunces, and outright thieves. As much as I wanna discredit Wolff, he got receipts and, more important, he used them. Wolff got it all. Wolff nailed them.

And look how he did it. He did it by sleazily ingratiating himself with the White House, gaining access, hosting weird private dinners, and then taking full advantage of the administration's basic lack of knowledge about how reporting works. Some of the officials Wolff got on tape claim to be unaware that they were on the record. Wolff denies this, but he's very much up front in the book's intro about the fact that he was able to exploit the incredible "lack of experience" on display here. In other words, Wolff got his book by playing a bunch of naive dopes.

Thank God for that. Wolff has spent this week thoroughly exploiting Trump and his minions the same way they've exploited the cluelessness of others. And he pulled it off because, at long last, there was a reporter out there willing to toss decorum aside and burn bridges the same way Trump does.

Everyone around Donald Trump is too polite to Donald Trump. Democrats, foreign dignitaries, underlings... all of them. And the White House press is perhaps the worst offender. From the media pool playing along with Sarah Sanders during press conferences--conferences where Sanders openly lies and pisses on democracy--to access merchants like Maggie Haberman doling out Trump gossip like so many bread crumbs, too many reporters have been far too deferential to an administration that is brazenly racist, dysfunctional, and corrupt. And for what purpose? It's clear to me that Haberman and the like aren't saving up their chits for just the EXACT right time to bring this Administration down. No, the only end goal of their access is continued access, to preserve it indefinitely so that the copy spigot never gets shut off. They are abiding by traditional wink-wink understandings that have long existed between the government and the press covering it.

But Wolff didn't do that. He did not engage in some endless bullshit access tango. No, Wolff actually USED his access, and extended zero courtesy to Trump on the process, and it's going to pay off for him not just from a book sales standpoint, but from a real journalistic impact. I am utterly sick to death of hearing anonymous reports about people inside the White House "concerned" about the madman currently in charge of everything. These people don't deserve the courtesy of discretion. They don't deserve to dictate the terms of coverage to people. They deserve to be torched.

Trump ascended into power in part because he relied on other people being too nice. It's fun to rampage through the china shop when the china shop owner is standing over there being like, "SIR, that is not how we do things here!" If Trump refuses to abide by the standard (and now useless) "norms" of the presidency--shit, if he doesn't even KNOW them--why should ANYONE in the press adhere to needless norms of their own? They shouldn't, and it appears that Michael Wolff was one of the few people to instinctively grasp that, and I hope more White House insiders follow his lead. Sometimes you need a rat to catch a rat.

That is pretty close to how I've felt about this.  I acknowledge that this guy's credibility is not the greatest.  But at the same time, I love the fact that he is trolling the fuck out of them.

  • linus
Re: Donald Trump Didn’t Want to Be President
Reply #39
Miller thinks Bannon's back can fit another knife. Nobody seems to care about the reports that was planning to dispute Wolff's account.


  • meepmeep
  • Administrator
  • zombiecat queen
Re: Donald Trump Didn’t Want to Be President
Reply #40
Wikileaks posts the full text of Wolff's book: http://thehill.com/blogs/blog-briefing-room/news/367832-wikileaks-shares-full-text-of-wolffs-trump-book

could they be any more transparent

Re: Donald Trump Didn’t Want to Be President
Reply #41
"leaking" a published and copyrighted work lmao

  • VoxRat
  • wtactualf
Re: Donald Trump Didn’t Want to Be President
Reply #42
"leaking" a published and copyrighted work lmao
But, hey!
Maybe if some people will read the pirated copy rather than buying the book, Trump's "loser" tweet-characterization of Wolff will look infinitesimally less retarded! 
"I understand Donald Trump better than many people because I really am a lot like him." - Dave Hawkins