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91
Here is Naish:
http://scienceblogs.com/tetrapodzoology/2009/06/10/birds-come-first-no-they-dont/
Quote
The fact that long remiges have now been documented in oviraptorosaurs, dromaeosaurids and other maniraptorans shows that feathered arms essentially the same as those present in basal birds evolved somewhere round about the base of the oviraptorosaur + paravian clade, and there is no evidence that wing-like arms were present in more basal coelurosaurs, nor in other theropods, or other dinosaurs, or other archosaurs.
It is really refreshing to see an honest statement like that.
"feathered arms essentially the same as those present in basal birds" appeared out of the blue.
With "no evidence that wing-like arms were present in more basal coelurosaurs, nor in other theropods, or other dinosaurs, or other archosaurs*".

* he is overlooking pterosaurs (which of course are also archosaurs)

Note: "the base of the oviraptorosaur + paravian clade" is called "Pennaraptora"
There are two absurdities here:
One is the appearance of "feathered arms essentially the same as those present in basal birds" out of the blue with "no evidence that wing-like arms were present in more basal coelurosaurs, nor in other theropods, or other dinosaurs, or other archosaurs".
The other is that these "feathered arms essentially the same as those present in basal birds" were not used for flying (nor evidence of secondarily flightlessness).

These are nonsense conclusions that are required with a dino to bird interpretation of the evidence.
This is the sort of nonsense you would NEVER accept in other situations.

Quote
The fact that long remiges have now been documented in oviraptorosaurs, dromaeosaurids and other maniraptorans shows that feathered arms essentially the same as those present in basal birds evolved somewhere round about the base of the oviraptorosaur + paravian clade, and there is no evidence that wing-like arms were present in more basal coelurosaurs, nor in other theropods, or other dinosaurs, or other archosaurs.
One thing I have wondered is whether the common ancestor (Pennaraptora) could fly or was flightless. How can they tell?
Anyone?
Let's try a thought experiment.
Let's analyze the situation if it could fly.
The good news is that it seems consistent with the evidence. That would explain the fact that it had feathered arms essentially the same as those present in basal birds. And in that case the oviraptorosaurs would be secondarily flightless.
Things seems to fit.
Anyone have any thoughts on that so far?
92
President's Committee on the Arts and Humanities.

Quote
Actor Kal Penn, artist Chuck Close and the entire membership of the President's Committee On the Arts and Humanities have announced their resignation. A letter dated Friday, and signed by 16 of 17 committee members, cited the "false equivalence" of President Donald Trump's comments about last weekend's "Unite the Right" gathering in Charlottesville, Virginia.
Quote
The only member whose name did not appear was Broadway director George C. Wolfe. Representatives for Wolfe at Creative Arts Agency said Friday that he was also resigning and that his name would be added to the letter, which seemed to contain a hidden political message beyond the ones stated openly. The first initials of the letter's six main paragraphs spell out "r-e-s-i-s-t."
Nice.

eta, the article says they were all appointed by Obama. Presumably Trump forgot to fire them. Or wanted to, but couldn't find any artists who'd want to sign up other than Kid Rock and Ted Nugent.
93
Here is Naish:
http://scienceblogs.com/tetrapodzoology/2009/06/10/birds-come-first-no-they-dont/
Quote
The fact that long remiges have now been documented in oviraptorosaurs, dromaeosaurids and other maniraptorans shows that feathered arms essentially the same as those present in basal birds evolved somewhere round about the base of the oviraptorosaur + paravian clade, and there is no evidence that wing-like arms were present in more basal coelurosaurs, nor in other theropods, or other dinosaurs, or other archosaurs.
It is really refreshing to see an honest statement like that.
"feathered arms essentially the same as those present in basal birds" appeared out of the blue.
With "no evidence that wing-like arms were present in more basal coelurosaurs, nor in other theropods, or other dinosaurs, or other archosaurs*".

* he is overlooking pterosaurs (which of course are also archosaurs)

Note: "the base of the oviraptorosaur + paravian clade" is called "Pennaraptora"
There are two absurdities here:
One is the appearance of "feathered arms essentially the same as those present in basal birds" out of the blue with "no evidence that wing-like arms were present in more basal coelurosaurs, nor in other theropods, or other dinosaurs, or other archosaurs".
The other is that these "feathered arms essentially the same as those present in basal birds" were not used for flying (nor evidence of secondarily flightlessness).

These are nonsense conclusions that are required with a dino to bird interpretation of the evidence.
This is the sort of nonsense you would NEVER accept in other situations.

Quote
The fact that long remiges have now been documented in oviraptorosaurs, dromaeosaurids and other maniraptorans shows that feathered arms essentially the same as those present in basal birds evolved somewhere round about the base of the oviraptorosaur + paravian clade, and there is no evidence that wing-like arms were present in more basal coelurosaurs, nor in other theropods, or other dinosaurs, or other archosaurs.
One thing I have wondered is whether the common ancestor (Pennaraptora) could fly or was flightless. How can they tell?
Anyone?

Good thing you already know the answer!
94
Lol. No. We went to the same art classes. He's older than me. He was pretty much ridiculed at the time for his work although it was pretty good even then. I think the wheelchair was more of a stigma then though and I think that had a lot to do with the criticism he got at the time. It's been something like 35 or 40 years since I've seen him. He seemed like a very weird dude.
95
Bye bye Bannon.
96
Here is Naish:
http://scienceblogs.com/tetrapodzoology/2009/06/10/birds-come-first-no-they-dont/
Quote
The fact that long remiges have now been documented in oviraptorosaurs, dromaeosaurids and other maniraptorans shows that feathered arms essentially the same as those present in basal birds evolved somewhere round about the base of the oviraptorosaur + paravian clade, and there is no evidence that wing-like arms were present in more basal coelurosaurs, nor in other theropods, or other dinosaurs, or other archosaurs.
It is really refreshing to see an honest statement like that.
"feathered arms essentially the same as those present in basal birds" appeared out of the blue.
With "no evidence that wing-like arms were present in more basal coelurosaurs, nor in other theropods, or other dinosaurs, or other archosaurs*".

* he is overlooking pterosaurs (which of course are also archosaurs)

Note: "the base of the oviraptorosaur + paravian clade" is called "Pennaraptora"
There are two absurdities here:
One is the appearance of "feathered arms essentially the same as those present in basal birds" out of the blue with "no evidence that wing-like arms were present in more basal coelurosaurs, nor in other theropods, or other dinosaurs, or other archosaurs".
The other is that these "feathered arms essentially the same as those present in basal birds" were not used for flying (nor evidence of secondarily flightlessness).

These are nonsense conclusions that are required with a dino to bird interpretation of the evidence.
This is the sort of nonsense you would NEVER accept in other situations.

Quote
The fact that long remiges have now been documented in oviraptorosaurs, dromaeosaurids and other maniraptorans shows that feathered arms essentially the same as those present in basal birds evolved somewhere round about the base of the oviraptorosaur + paravian clade, and there is no evidence that wing-like arms were present in more basal coelurosaurs, nor in other theropods, or other dinosaurs, or other archosaurs.
One thing I have wondered is whether the common ancestor (Pennaraptora) could fly or was flightless. How can they tell?
Anyone?
97
Would you say he is a Close friend?
98
I know Chuck Close. Hmm.
99
President's Committee on the Arts and Humanities.

Quote
Actor Kal Penn, artist Chuck Close and the entire membership of the President's Committee On the Arts and Humanities have announced their resignation. A letter dated Friday, and signed by 16 of 17 committee members, cited the "false equivalence" of President Donald Trump's comments about last weekend's "Unite the Right" gathering in Charlottesville, Virginia.
100