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TR Memescape

  • TR: ima be more drunk in a few bitches!!!

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21
What makes you think that the two hypotheses are mutually exclusive? What if BOTH an excess of carbohydrates and an excess of fats is responsible for illness?

Did I just blow your mind?
22
I say this primarily because she seems to believe that the reported coronary problems among the Inuit that she has read about IS CAUSED BY their diet which is high in animal fats.  Which seems to align with Keys' view.

I - on the other hand - believe that any coronary problems among the Inuit would have been caused by WESTERNIZED DIETS.
23
I will let Pingu speak for herself, but it appears that she subscribes to some variation of the Keys Hypothesis (as opposed to the Cleave-Yudkin hypothesis) ... here's Hujoel's summary of the Keys hypothesis
Quote
On  the
opposite  side,  Keys  postulated  the  lipid  hypothe-
sis:   that   excessive   dietary   lipid   intake   caused 
systemic  diseases.
  Keys  advocated  a  diet  high  in
fermentable carbohydrate for the benefit of general
health,  and  dental  diseases  became  regarded  as
local  dietary  side  effects.  Because  general  health
takes precedence over dental health when it comes
to dietary recommendations, dental diseases became
viewed  as  local  infections;  interventions  such  as
fluorides,  sealants,  oral  hygiene,  antimicrobials,
and dental fillings became synonymous with main-
taining  dental  health,  and  carbohydrates  were  no
longer  considered  as  a  common  cause  for  dental-
systemic diseases.
24
If you want a really simple way of looking at my agricultural philosophy, you have only to read this one paragraph from this paper ...
Quote
When individuals with a hunter-gatherer lifestyle transitioned to Western
lifestyles  as  a  result  of  agriculturization,  migration,  colonization,  or  other
circumstances, CNCDs[1] appeared.

So (Voxrat) ... I am simply seeking to return to what I believe to be the key aspects of the hunter-gatherer diet in which the animals are ranched instead of hunted (the "hunter" part) and in which the fruits and vegetables and minimal grains are raised via gardening (the "gatherer" part).

In this way, we can EAT like hunter-gatherers ... but not have to spend so much time doing it ... AND we can live at a much higher density than true hunter-gatherers ... not sure exactly the density for my area yet, but it might be as high as 2 persons per acre.  If 1 person per acre is the global average for all lands which could be used for agriculture and there are 20 billion such acres worldwide, then this implies a maximum world population of 20 billion.  (admittedly much lower than one of my earlier wild guesses of 100 billion ... yes, I'm pretty sure I'm wrong about that)
Cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus, certain cancers, and dementia are
examples of systemic CNCDs. Dental caries, periodontal disease, certain oral
cancers,  and  leukoplakia  are  examples  of dental CNCDs.
26
perhaps combined with a fixation
27
Dave, do you think anyone (especially among those of us in the medical profession) has any issues or objections to the findings of that paper (that you keep posting and reposting for some reason)?
Pingu does.  See above.
Wrong. No one (and not Pingu, as far as I'm aware) disputes that excess of carbohydrates is bad for the health, and causes serious systemic illness. Can you tell me where she's said otherwise?
28
One note - every time I bring up the topic of the Inuits being quite healthy living on animal foods alone, Pingu says "yabbut ... they have a high incidence of coronary disease"

Well hold on ... WHICH INUITS are we talking about?  Price found two subgroups within each group he visited - one group was eating strictly indigenous foods and had perfect teeth ... and the other group was eating a westernized diet.

Now it's true that Price did not stay with the perfect teeth groups long enough to check their health when they were old (who could?) ... but THIS PAPER says that perfect teeth is an EARLY INDICATOR of future long term wrt systemic CNDCs.
We've been through all that dave.

Yes, dental health is an indicator for long term systemic CNDCs. Why? Fermented carbohydrates. Too much sugar is bad. This is not something new.

As for the inuit and Masai, you were shown the links in the past. Shall I look for them again?
29
Dave, do you think anyone (especially among those of us in the medical profession) has any issues or objections to the findings of that paper (that you keep posting and reposting for some reason)?
Pingu does.  See above.
30
One note - every time I bring up the topic of the Inuits being quite healthy living on animal foods alone, Pingu says "yabbut ... they have a high incidence of coronary disease"

Well hold on ... WHICH INUITS are we talking about?  Price found two subgroups within each group he visited - one group was eating strictly indigenous foods and had perfect teeth ... and the other group was eating a westernized diet.

Now it's true that Price did not stay with the perfect teeth groups long enough to check their health when they were old (who could?) ... but THIS PAPER says that perfect teeth is an EARLY INDICATOR of future long term wrt systemic CNDCs.