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Topic: Earliest humans in NA (Read 273 times) previous topic - next topic

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  • Bilirubin
  • Ain't nothing ta fuck wit'
Earliest humans in NA
This will probably be controversial...
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/speaking-of-science/wp/2017/04/26/archaeology-shocker-study-claims-humans-reached-the-americas-130000-years-ago/?utm_term=.5a395c8104c1&wpisrc=al_alert-hse&wpmk=1
Quote
Some 130,000 years ago, scientists say, a mysterious group of ancient people visited the coastline of what is now Southern California. More than 100,000 years before they were supposed to have arrived in the Americas, these unknown people used five heavy stones to break the bones of a mastodon. They cracked open femurs to suck out the marrow and, using the rocks as hammers, scored deep notches in the bone. When finished, they abandoned the materials in the soft, fine soil; one tusk planted upright in the ground like a single flag in the archaeological record. Then the people vanished.

  • borealis
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Re: Earliest humans in NA
Reply #1
sasquatch.

Re: Earliest humans in NA
Reply #2
almost certainly bullshit.

  • Bilirubin
  • Ain't nothing ta fuck wit'
Re: Earliest humans in NA
Reply #3
almost certainly bullshit.
Dan Fisher is one of the most careful, and thoughtful, workers in paleo that I have ever met.

  • el jefe
  • asleep till 2020 or 2024
Re: Earliest humans in NA
Reply #4
almost certainly bullshit.
that was my first reaction, but the more I read, the more legit it sounded

  • el jefe
  • asleep till 2020 or 2024
Re: Earliest humans in NA
Reply #5
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beringia

Quote
During the Pleistocene epoch, global cooling led periodically to the expansion of glaciers and lowering of sea levels. This created land connections in various regions around the globe.[18] Today, the average water depth of the Bering Strait is 40-50 m (130-160 ft), therefore the land bridge opened when the sea level dropped more than 50 m (160 ft) below the current level.[19][20] A reconstruction of the sea-level history of the region indicated that a seaway existed from c.  135,000 - c.  70,000 BP, a land bridge from c.  70,000 - c.  60,000 BP, intermittent connection from c.  60,000 - c.  30,000 BP, a land bridge from c.  30,000 - c.  11,000 BP, followed by a Holocene sea-level rise that reopened the strait.[21][22] Post-glacial rebound has continued to raise some sections of coast.
assuming they got there by walking across the land bridge, it looks like people in North America ~130kya must have come there before 135kya.

was it some stray, isolated group that wandered across shortly before it closed and then died off within a few years or generations?  guessing the error bars on those ^^ numbers are big enough to allow for that.  ...  or was it a substantial population that survived for a while? 

eta: teeth, you have to answer this.  it is an assignment.

Re: Earliest humans in NA
Reply #6
almost certainly bullshit.
Dan Fisher is one of the most careful, and thoughtful, workers in paleo that I have ever met.

Absolutely. But everyone makes mistakes, and this wouldn't be the first time that early Pleistocene geofacts from southern California mislead serious scientists. Leakey wasted a ton of effort on the Calico Early Man Site outside of San Bern, for example, and really hurt his reputation doing so.

Re: Earliest humans in NA
Reply #7

  • el jefe
  • asleep till 2020 or 2024
Re: Earliest humans in NA
Reply #8
that would be embarassing for the homo californiano theory

Re: Earliest humans in NA
Reply #9
Yep.

Re: Earliest humans in NA
Reply #10
Believer in High Powers, and naturally, logarithms.
Pikkiwoki is the one true god.

  • el jefe
  • asleep till 2020 or 2024
Re: Earliest humans in NA
Reply #11
Quote
Scientists have known that DNA can survive in ancient sediments since 2003
wow, this will really help us learn about prehistoric humans from 2003

what a useless discovery ::)

  • RAFH
  • Have a life, already.
Re: Earliest humans in NA
Reply #12
Quote
Scientists have known that DNA can survive in ancient sediments since 2003
wow, this will really help us learn about prehistoric humans from 2003

what a useless discovery ::)
To you, maybe, but is anybody recording the history of the Millennials? They are entitled to have a history and a past. Even if they don't want it now. They'll grow older and given they can't remember yesterday, they'll want a history. Assuming they don't all die early deaths.

I'm working on that.
Are we there yet?