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Topic: Death by Specialization (Read 2184 times) previous topic - next topic

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Death by Specialization
Which is closely related to "Death by Booga Booga" ... the prospect of which always frightened me as a kid ...

This is from Wendell Berry ... " The Unsettling of America"

http://www.intellectualtakeout.org/blog/wendell-berrys-unsettling-description-modern-life

  • RAFH
  • Have a life, already.
Re: Death by Specialization
Reply #1
Which is closely related to "Death by Booga Booga" ... the prospect of which always frightened me as a kid ...

This is from Wendell Berry ... " The Unsettling of America"

http://www.intellectualtakeout.org/blog/wendell-berrys-unsettling-description-modern-life

 I'm glad he's got his opinion. Though given he comes from a certain background, one that is antithacle to modern reality and pretty much based in a centuries old paradigm, it's ill-placed and off target.

Of course, finding out there is no evidence for most of what your fantasy myth records happened, and little of it corresponds to observable reality and about nothing else, you need to strike out with some sort of defense of your refuted beliefs.
Are we there yet?

  • Zombies!
  • Honorary Manipulative Bitch
Re: Death by Specialization
Reply #2
The natural opposite of specialization is waste, and amatures making everything.
My own theory is that he kens fine he jist disnae wantae.

  • RAFH
  • Have a life, already.
Re: Death by Specialization
Reply #3
Which is closely related to "Death by Booga Booga" ... the prospect of which always frightened me as a kid ...

This is from Wendell Berry ... " The Unsettling of America"

http://www.intellectualtakeout.org/blog/wendell-berrys-unsettling-description-modern-life

 I'm glad he's got his opinion. Though given he comes from a certain background, one that is antithacle to modern reality and pretty much based in a centuries old paradigm, it's ill-placed and off target.

Of course, finding out there is no evidence for most of what your fantasy myth records happened, and little of it corresponds to observable reality and about nothing else, you need to strike out with some sort of defense of your refuted beliefs.
Oh, is Wendell Berry some sort of authority? Is he tuned into the Cosmic Truth.

Indeed, your belief system is based upon an immortal being that's always existed and created us in this world that is little more than a small cough by a small child in a small assembly of a very small group for a very short time on a planet that has a very short life span in a universe that's going to disappear, has little to do with our day to day life.
Are we there yet?

  • VoxRat
  • wtactualf
Re: Death by Specialization
Reply #4
For some reason the champion of "do it yourself dentistry" is reluctant to tell us what happened to that tooth, after the $2.97 Walmart glue solution failed. 

:dunno:
"I understand Donald Trump better than many people because I really am a lot like him." - Dave Hawkins

  • Zombies!
  • Honorary Manipulative Bitch
Re: Death by Specialization
Reply #5
For some reason the champion of "do it yourself dentistry" is reluctant to tell us what happened to that tooth, after the $2.97 Walmart glue solution failed. 

:dunno:
Why does Dave visit prostitutes, if he's a 'master' of do it yourself?
My own theory is that he kens fine he jist disnae wantae.

  • RAFH
  • Have a life, already.
Re: Death by Specialization
Reply #6
For some reason the champion of "do it yourself dentistry" is reluctant to tell us what happened to that tooth, after the $2.97 Walmart glue solution failed. 

:dunno:
Why does Dave visit prostitutes, if he's a 'master' of do it yourself?
Cuz they are better at it than he is. And, he;s found some that like raw goat's milk,.
Are we there yet?

Re: Death by Specialization
Reply #7
For some reason the champion of "do it yourself dentistry" is reluctant to tell us what happened to that tooth, after the $2.97 Walmart glue solution failed. 

:dunno:
It's the same as it was before.  No further changes.

Re: Death by Specialization
Reply #8
"antithacle"

Lol

Is that like the opposite of a barnacle?

Re: Death by Specialization
Reply #9
The natural opposite of specialization is waste, and amatures making everything.
The natural extension of specialization, however, is that researchers increasingly are unable to communicate their understanding with outside fields. It's a large part of the reason that consilience has partly replaced falsifiability as the modern philosophy of science.

I didn't read the article and Dave doesn't have a clue what research even means but this is a topic that fascinates me. I see it as a logical extension of the compartmentalization described by Kuhn as normal science. A problem with the system has been identified and the natural reaction is to address it.
Love is like a magic penny
 if you hold it tight you won't have any
if you give it away you'll have so many
they'll be rolling all over the floor

Re: Death by Specialization
Reply #10
"antithacle"

Lol

Is that like the opposite of a barnacle?
It's the physiological structure that replaces follicles during male pattern baldness.
Love is like a magic penny
 if you hold it tight you won't have any
if you give it away you'll have so many
they'll be rolling all over the floor

  • Zombies!
  • Honorary Manipulative Bitch
Re: Death by Specialization
Reply #11
For some reason the champion of "do it yourself dentistry" is reluctant to tell us what happened to that tooth, after the $2.97 Walmart glue solution failed. 

:dunno:
It's the same as it was before.  No further changes.
So you still have what looks like the base of a broken bottle for a tooth?  It's not healed at all?
My own theory is that he kens fine he jist disnae wantae.

Re: Death by Specialization
Reply #12
Start a dentistry thread

  • Zombies!
  • Honorary Manipulative Bitch
Re: Death by Specialization
Reply #13
So is it turning your tongue into hamburger?  The last time you wrote about it, you described that it was sharp.
My own theory is that he kens fine he jist disnae wantae.

Re: Death by Specialization
Reply #14
Start a dentistry thread

Re: Death by Specialization
Reply #15
The natural opposite of specialization is waste, and amatures making everything.
The natural extension of specialization, however, is that researchers increasingly are unable to communicate their understanding with outside fields. It's a large part of the reason that consilience has partly replaced falsifiability as the modern philosophy of science.
I didn't know that this has occurred but if you're right, then this would explain the huge whoppers now accepted as truth by mainstream science.  I suspect that geocentrism enjoyed "consilience" in it's heyday.

Quote
I didn't read the article and Dave doesn't have a clue what research even means but this is a topic that fascinates me. I see it as a logical extension of the compartmentalization described by Kuhn as normal science. A problem with the system has been identified and the natural reaction is to address it.
Read the article, ya ding dong! 

  • Faid
Re: Death by Specialization
Reply #16
The natural opposite of specialization is waste, and amatures making everything.
The natural extension of specialization, however, is that researchers increasingly are unable to communicate their understanding with outside fields. It's a large part of the reason that consilience has partly replaced falsifiability as the modern philosophy of science.
I didn't know that this has occurred but if you're right, then this would explain the huge whoppers now accepted as truth by mainstream science.  I suspect that geocentrism enjoyed "consilience" in it's heyday.
Oh, you "suspect" that?

Cool. Let's say that your "suspicions" are correct, and that geocentricism 'enjoyed concilience' in his heyday.

Did a Young Earth (which ALSO had its "heyday") enjoy concilience as well?
Who even made the rule that we cannot group ducks and fish together for the simple reason that they are both aquatic? If I want to group them that way and it serves my purpose then I can jolly well do it however I want to and it is still a nested hierarchy and you can't tell me that it's not.

Re: Death by Specialization
Reply #17
It is kind of funny: the main thing driving this specialization is the fact that in places where it has been succesful, we simply do not accept home-botched stuff anymore. We have stopped accepting do-it-yourself remedies because we no longer accept huge child mortality rates, or permanent injuries from diseases. In fact, when these things which used to be a common experience for the vast majority of people happen, we tend to see it as a failure of the systems we have put in place to prevent them.

We expect our devices to work, and to do things which anything home-built just cannot deliver anymore. We expect to permanently live in a state of food-plenty, no matter what the season, or if the year has been a good one or not.

Ironically, the very success of specialization has bred the conditions in which it is possible to experience a vague yearning for the simple old times. Within easy range of a Macdonalds and an emergency room we can write long theories about self-sufficiency on Iphones and laptops that most of us could not even begin to describe the basic operating principles of.

And because things like food shortages, a 40% child mortality rate and information and entertainment as expensive privileges are now almost outside of living human memory for a lot of countries, we have a tendency to forget they ever existed. We can selectively forget them. We can indulge our dislike for things we do not understand, because we do not like to be reminded that there are lots of people who know more about things than we do. We can decry complexity, because we have forgotten why we bothered to come up with these complex systems in the first place.

And this has apparently allowed the writer of this piece to come to some weird conclusions, like that apparently it is less stressful to try and cure your child's polio with a home-brew herbal remedy than rely on an expert to do it with modern medicine.

Re: Death by Specialization
Reply #18
I completely disagree with your analysis ... and the fundamental reason I disagree is because you have bought the modern lie that "modern high tech has reduced food shortages and diseases" ... it hasn't.

Re: Death by Specialization
Reply #19
We would all be much more healthy if we could wave a magic wand and instantly be transformed into an agrarian society of small closely associated villages spread out all over the countryside in which food production is very low tech (at least from the perspective of say, a Google engineer) - milk, meat, egg production produced by flerds with live human shepherds with border collies, gardening by individuals or neighborhoods done the old fashioned ways, simple, basic fishing (for Pingu) and simple low tech gathering of nuts and berries.

Re: Death by Specialization
Reply #20
We would all be much more healthy if we could wave a magic wand and instantly be transformed into an agrarian society of small closely associated villages spread out all over the countryside in which food production is very low tech (at least from the perspective of say, a Google engineer) - milk, meat, egg production produced by flerds with live human shepherds with border collies, gardening by individuals or neighborhoods done the old fashioned ways, simple, basic fishing (for Pingu) and simple low tech gathering of nuts and berries.

Don't forget the shitting in buckets or the mail order prostitutes.

  • osmanthus
  • Administrator
  • Fingerer of piglets
Re: Death by Specialization
Reply #21
It was called "the Middle Ages".
Truth is out of style

  • VoxRat
  • wtactualf
Re: Death by Specialization
Reply #22
Start a dentistry thread
Nah.
That would be  ...  specialization.
"I understand Donald Trump better than many people because I really am a lot like him." - Dave Hawkins

Re: Death by Specialization
Reply #23
Shitting in buckets - if properly managed -  would be a hell of a lot more healthy for the community (which includes our soils) than any of our modern systems.

Did they have high-speed Wi-Fi in the 14th century?  Let me think.

  • VoxRat
  • wtactualf
Re: Death by Specialization
Reply #24
I completely disagree with your analysis ... and the fundamental reason I disagree is because you have bought the modern lie that "modern high tech has reduced food shortages and diseases" ... it hasn't.
Yeah. Actually, it has.
"I understand Donald Trump better than many people because I really am a lot like him." - Dave Hawkins