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No such domain
On my computer, I'm receiving a dns_probe_finished_nxdomain error for talkrational.org. Isup.me said TR was up several times, but once said it was down. I flushed the DNS cache, and it still doesn't work. TR is still working on my phone, though.

  • borealis
  • Administrator
Re: No such domain
Reply #1
@ravenscape we need you! or @osmanthus 

Re: No such domain
Reply #2
And now, downforeveryoneorjustme.com is occasionally saying it's up, and occasionally saying it's down, and occasionally returning. 504 error, which seems bizarre.

Re: No such domain
Reply #3
And now TR's back on my computer. Didn't change anything other than flushing DNS.

  • borealis
  • Administrator
Re: No such domain
Reply #4
Very odd, uncool. It hasn't happened to me - yet.

BTW, adding the @ character before a username notifies them about the post. So they may have an insight on the problem.

  • MikeS
Re: No such domain
Reply #5

  • osmanthus
  • Administrator
  • Fingerer of piglets
Re: No such domain
Reply #6
Eh?
Truth is out of style

  • borealis
  • Administrator
Re: No such domain
Reply #7
heya, Os - got any idea why uncool's having a problem? Maybe not cool enough? :hehe:

I'm sure raven will show soonish. She usually has at least a comforting set of educated guesses.

  • osmanthus
  • Administrator
  • Fingerer of piglets
Re: No such domain
Reply #8
I've been outside, trying to figure out which of the things I should have planted ages ago are still worth planting. :p
Truth is out of style

  • osmanthus
  • Administrator
  • Fingerer of piglets
Re: No such domain
Reply #9
Just to clarify, this is a "No". At a guess, server glitch caused by *insert cause du jour*.
Truth is out of style

  • borealis
  • Administrator
Re: No such domain
Reply #10
I dunno about your fleurs, but my phlox this year are very healthy and smell extra fragrant - maybe it was the new dirt I gave them last spring. Brought some in for a bouquet and the whole house smells nice.

  • osmanthus
  • Administrator
  • Fingerer of piglets
Re: No such domain
Reply #11
Why would you use new dirt for a bouquet? Canadians are weird.
Truth is out of style

Re: No such domain
Reply #12
It was doing the same thing for me this morning. It's working fine now.

  • ravenscape
  • Administrator
  • Triggered
Re: No such domain
Reply #13
We had a minor server glitch last weekend, too.  I contacted grayweb about it while TR was unreachable and they were already working on it.  Probably something similar today.

  • borealis
  • Administrator
Re: No such domain
Reply #14
Why would you use new dirt for a bouquet? Canadians are weird.
If you couldn't see dirt for six months of the year, you too might appreciate its intrinsic beauty and heady fragrance.  :colbert:

  • osmanthus
  • Administrator
  • Fingerer of piglets
Re: No such domain
Reply #15
Fair enough. Mind you I don't see cane toads for six months of the year (they hibernate in winter, even in the subtropics) but I still find myself unable to appreciate their intrinsic beauty. Dead ones have a heady fragrance, which is also difficult to appreciate.
Truth is out of style

  • osmanthus
  • Administrator
  • Fingerer of piglets
Re: No such domain
Reply #16
By the way, fleurs is generally good. The roses down the bottom had a bit of a sulk after they went diving due to Cyclone Debbie. Kelp is fine underwater so it beats me why roses sulk. No sense of adventure I suppose. Anyway they are bouncing back for spring.

Sorting through things that should have been planted yonks ago yielded some interesting results. I have a baby tree. Buggered if I know what it is. A friend gave it to me in a small brown pot. So I ring friend and describe it. She says probably native tamarind, which rang a bell in my brain. Only one problem. I look the thing up and the foliage is completely different. So I ring her back and say nope, not native tamarind. She sends me a pic of a "native tamarind" in a pot at her place. Same tree. Not native tamarind.

So I have a tree. Undoubtedly native, but I have NFI what the bloody thing is. Fortunately this doesn't matter much. I can be reasonably sure it is going to be big, and will do pretty well in the local soil in an average spot, so will just bung it in and cross fingers.

Then I have another tree. Also native. Also in small brown pot. Not friend's fault this time. My fault. I bought it, but can't remember what it is. I think it's a Podocarpus elatus. Foliage is right for that, so will treat accordingly and see what happens.
  • Last Edit: September 02, 2017, 12:28:04 PM by osmanthus
Truth is out of style

  • borealis
  • Administrator
Re: No such domain
Reply #17
Lol, good luck with the mystery trees.

A not too interested in botany friend planted one of these, or a closely related species, in her flower garden a few years ago:



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Convolvulus_arvensis

It's very pretty. It's taken over, of course, has strangled all her more delicately stemmed plants, and is currently trying to smother her lilacs.

  • osmanthus
  • Administrator
  • Fingerer of piglets
Re: No such domain
Reply #18
Ah yes, a trap for the unwary. :grin:

We have a couple of native species of Convulvulus: Convolvulus angustissimus and Convolvulus erubescens

There may be a few others too. Wouldn't surprise me.
Truth is out of style

  • RAFH
  • Have a life, already.
Re: No such domain
Reply #19
Ah yes, a trap for the unwary. :grin:

We have a couple of native species of Convulvulus: Convolvulus angustissimus and Convolvulus erubescens

There may be a few others too. Wouldn't surprise me.
Hey, it's Australia, don't all plants there strangle everything they can? Except, of course, the spiders. And the snakes. And ... ...

Is there anything there that is not poisonous or deadly or somehow obnoxious?
Are we there yet?

  • Fenrir
Re: No such domain
Reply #20
Ah yes, a trap for the unwary. :grin:

We have a couple of native species of Convulvulus: Convolvulus angustissimus and Convolvulus erubescens

There may be a few others too. Wouldn't surprise me.
Hey, it's Australia, don't all plants there strangle everything they can? Except, of course, the spiders. And the snakes. And ... ...

Is there anything there that is not poisonous or deadly or somehow obnoxious?

Some of the sheep.
It's what plants crave.

  • RAFH
  • Have a life, already.
Re: No such domain
Reply #21
Ah yes, a trap for the unwary. :grin:

We have a couple of native species of Convulvulus: Convolvulus angustissimus and Convolvulus erubescens

There may be a few others too. Wouldn't surprise me.
Hey, it's Australia, don't all plants there strangle everything they can? Except, of course, the spiders. And the snakes. And ... ...

Is there anything there that is not poisonous or deadly or somehow obnoxious?

Some of the sheep.
Some? So one might want to avoid garments made with Australian wool?
Are we there yet?

  • Fenrir
Re: No such domain
Reply #22
Sigh

Quote
Death held out a hand. I WANT, he said, A BOOK ABOUT THE DANGEROUS CREATURES OF FOURECKS-

Albert looked up and dived for cover, receiving only mild bruising because he had the foresight to curl into a ball.

After a while Death, his voice a little muffled, said: ALBERT, I WOULD BE SO GRATEFUL IF YOU COULD GIVE ME A HAND HERE.

Albert scrambled up and pulled at some of the huge volumes, finally dislodging enough of them for his master to clamber free.

HMM... Death picked up a book at random and read the cover. "DANGEROUS MAMMALS, REPTILES, AMPHIBIANS, BIRDS, FISH, JELLYFISH, INSECTS, SPIDERS, CRUSTACEANS, GRASSES, TREES, MOSSES, AND LICHENS OF TERROR INCOGNITA, " he read. His gaze moved down the spine. VOLUME 29C, he added. OH. PART THREE, I SEE.

He glanced up at the listening shelves. POSSIBLY IT WOULD BE SIMPLER IF I ASKED FOR A LIST OF THE HARMLESS CREATURES OF THE AFORESAID CONTINENT?

They waited.

IT WOULD APPEAR THAT-

"No, wait master. Here it comes."

Albert pointed to something white zigzagging lazily through the air. Finally Death reached up an caught the single sheet of paper.

He read it carefully and then turned it over briefly just in case anything was written on the other side.

"May I?" said Albert. Death handed him the paper.

"'Some of the sheep, '" Albert read aloud. "Oh, well. Maybe a week at the seaside'd be better, then."

WHAT AN INTRIGUING PLACE, said Death. SADDLE UP THE HORSE, ALBERT. I FEEL SURE I'M GOING TO BE NEEDED.
It's what plants crave.

  • borealis
  • Administrator
Re: No such domain
Reply #23
Still - I've had several Australians point out that all of their poisonous/venomous/toxic/dangerous animals and plants together don't equal the absolutely terrifying megafauna, both carnivorous and herbivorous, that haunt the wilds and sometimes the towns and villages of North America. You could don a pair of good ankle boots and long pants and wander freely almost anywhere in Australia and be fully protected from inadvertent contact with biting stinging things, but in North America? GIANT BEARS WILL KILL YOU AND EAT YOU! VERY LARGE CATS MAY STALK YOU, BITE YOU IN THE HEAD, AND KILL YOU AND EAT YOU! GIANT PACKS OF CANIDS MAY HUNT YOU DOWN AND KILL YOU AND EAT YOU! Last but certainly not least, GIANT DEER WITH ANTLERS THE SIZE OF BATHTUBS MAY RUN YOU DOWN AND STOMP YOU TO DEATH!

Makes drop bears look kinda cuddly.

  • RAFH
  • Have a life, already.
Re: No such domain
Reply #24
Still - I've had several Australians point out that all of their poisonous/venomous/toxic/dangerous animals and plants together don't equal the absolutely terrifying megafauna, both carnivorous and herbivorous, that haunt the wilds and sometimes the towns and villages of North America. You could don a pair of good ankle boots and long pants and wander freely almost anywhere in Australia and be fully protected from inadvertent contact with biting stinging things, but in North America? GIANT BEARS WILL KILL YOU AND EAT YOU! VERY LARGE CATS MAY STALK YOU, BITE YOU IN THE HEAD, AND KILL YOU AND EAT YOU! GIANT PACKS OF CANIDS MAY HUNT YOU DOWN AND KILL YOU AND EAT YOU! Last but certainly not least, GIANT DEER WITH ANTLERS THE SIZE OF BATHTUBS MAY RUN YOU DOWN AND STOMP YOU TO DEATH!

Makes drop bears look kinda cuddly.
It's not the existence of various dangerous critters, it's their ubiquitous nature, Virtually everything in Australia is poisonous, Or seriously dangerous,

Yeah, there are big nasty bear, and mean ass big cats and so in, but they are not by any means the majority of organisms nor prevalent. I've seen plenty of bears, but mostly in National Parks, I've seen one cougar, and that was a long time ago. I've been
Still - I've had several Australians point out that all of their poisonous/venomous/toxic/dangerous animals and plants together don't equal the absolutely terrifying megafauna, both carnivorous and herbivorous, that haunt the wilds and sometimes the towns and villages of North America. You could don a pair of good ankle boots and long pants and wander freely almost anywhere in Australia and be fully protected from inadvertent contact with biting stinging things, but in North America? GIANT BEARS WILL KILL YOU AND EAT YOU! VERY LARGE CATS MAY STALK YOU, BITE YOU IN THE HEAD, AND KILL YOU AND EAT YOU! GIANT PACKS OF CANIDS MAY HUNT YOU DOWN AND KILL YOU AND EAT YOU! Last but certainly not least, GIANT DEER WITH ANTLERS THE SIZE OF BATHTUBS MAY RUN YOU DOWN AND STOMP YOU TO DEATH!

Makes drop bears look kinda cuddly.
When's the last time you were confronted with a Large Man-Eating Bear, or a Large Man-Eating Cat, or a large pack of Man-Eating Wolves or been in danger of being stomped to death by Giant Deer?

I've spent a lot if time in the wild, seen a lot of bears, none have attacked me. I've seen one Cougar, it didn't attack me. Seen one pack of wolves, they didn't attack me. Seen lots and lots of deer, but never felt threatened by them.
Still - I've had several Australians point out that all of their poisonous/venomous/toxic/dangerous animals and plants together don't equal the absolutely terrifying megafauna, both carnivorous and herbivorous, that haunt the wilds and sometimes the towns and villages of North America. You could don a pair of good ankle boots and long pants and wander freely almost anywhere in Australia and be fully protected from inadvertent contact with biting stinging things, but in North America? GIANT BEARS WILL KILL YOU AND EAT YOU! VERY LARGE CATS MAY STALK YOU, BITE YOU IN THE HEAD, AND KILL YOU AND EAT YOU! GIANT PACKS OF CANIDS MAY HUNT YOU DOWN AND KILL YOU AND EAT YOU! Last but certainly not least, GIANT DEER WITH ANTLERS THE SIZE OF BATHTUBS MAY RUN YOU DOWN AND STOMP YOU TO DEATH!

Makes drop bears look kinda cuddly.
If you are so in need of taking a piss, do so in the appropriate facility. Make sure you check for spiders. And lions. And tigers. And bears.

Oh, almost forgot, snakes.
Are we there yet?

  • borealis
  • Administrator
Re: No such domain
Reply #25
Lol, RAFH, it's not my perception, it's the perception of some Australians who've never been here and/or are joking.

As for Aussie dangers, nostrum and her partner and kids have managed to avoid all the venomous/poisonous things so far, despite spending most of their lives in Australia. But a while ago, her partner ended up in hospital for weeks, with multiple serious injuries, the results of a bicycle/kangaroo collision. No toxic/poisonous critters involved. 

Also, dunno if you knew this, but coyotes in my province have a penchant for killing folk singers and biting the heads of sleeping campers. I'm a folk singer, like camping, and hear coyotes vocalising across the (very small) lake most evenings through fall, winter and spring.  :ohmy:

  • MSG
Re: No such domain
Reply #26
Drop bears are cuddly. Sharks aren't poisonous.  You guys are such drama queens...
braying among the ruins

  • borealis
  • Administrator
Re: No such domain
Reply #27
"cuddly"


  • MSG
Re: No such domain
Reply #28
He's just had a shower; once he's dried off he'll be pretty as a picture
braying among the ruins

  • borealis
  • Administrator
Re: No such domain
Reply #29
Oh sure, they get all fluffy and shit, but -


  • MSG
Re: No such domain
Reply #30
Turn it up.  He's gotta eat...
braying among the ruins

  • osmanthus
  • Administrator
  • Fingerer of piglets
Re: No such domain
Reply #31
Drop bears are cuddly. Sharks aren't poisonous.  You guys are such drama queens...
Yeah but cassowarys are buggers of things.
Truth is out of style

  • MSG
Re: No such domain
Reply #32
If your home was getting constantly knocked down and your kids run over by cars, you'd be cranky too
braying among the ruins

  • osmanthus
  • Administrator
  • Fingerer of piglets
Re: No such domain
Reply #33
Fair point.

Taipans are cool. Dunno why people freak out about taipans.
Truth is out of style

  • borealis
  • Administrator
Re: No such domain
Reply #34
yeah, I'm with the cassowaries under the circumstances. Not with them, you understand, but cheering them on from a good distance.

  • osmanthus
  • Administrator
  • Fingerer of piglets
Re: No such domain
Reply #35
If your home was getting constantly knocked down and your kids run over by cars, you'd be cranky too
Although I did used to know a girl who would tell her kids to go play on the freeway when they were being annoying.
Truth is out of style

  • borealis
  • Administrator
Re: No such domain
Reply #36
Fair point.

Taipans are cool. Dunno why people freak out about taipans.
Yeah I looked them up. Then I looked up this kid:

Quote
Early life[edit]

After leaving school, Budden worked as a retail assistant in Randwick, New South Wales.[4] At this time he joined the Australian Reptile Club and began hunting snakes as a hobby. He built his own snake pit and spent weekends in the bush collecting snakes.[5] In 1948 he caught some 59 snakes and was bitten five times.[4]


Taipan capture and death[edit]

In March 1950, Budden traveled to Queensland with two colleagues in an attempt to find and capture a taipan for the purpose of antivenom research.[3] The group had previously visited Cape York and the Northern Territory on a similar quest.[6][7] On July 27 Budden found a six-foot taipan near Cairns. While attempting to bag the snake, he was bitten on his left thumb. Budden was able to place the captured snake in a bag, and was taken for medical treatment. Although doctors were initially hopeful he would recover, he died the following afternoon.[3][8][9]
The captured snake was sent alive to the Commonwealth Research Laboratories in Melbourne,[8][9] where its venom was successfully milked by zoologist David Fleay,[11] who was at that time the director of Healesville Sanctuary.[9] Venom from the captured taipan was instrumental in researching and developing an antivenom, which became available in 1955.[12]

...

In a 2014 article published in the Journal of Proteomics, University of Queensland venomologist Bryan Fry reported finding specimens of the venom harvested from the taipan that killed Budden. His study found that the venom had retained its toxicity after almost sixty years in dry storage.[3][13]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kevin_Budden

the venom had retained its toxicity after almost sixty years in dry storage

  • osmanthus
  • Administrator
  • Fingerer of piglets
Re: No such domain
Reply #37
OK, so what? A lot of compounds will stay stable for that length of time.

And he got bitten because he was giving the snake a hard time. If you don't give them a hard time, taipans are pretty laid back.
Truth is out of style

  • MSG
Re: No such domain
Reply #38
braying among the ruins

  • RAFH
  • Have a life, already.
Re: No such domain
Reply #39
If your home was getting constantly knocked down and your kids run over by cars, you'd be cranky too
Obviously, MSG has never been killed by the Aussie wildlife.
Until he or she has, I suggest we ignore his or her comments.
Those of Osmanthus as well.
Obvious shills for the Aussie tourism and real estate industries.

I mean, why would the Brits, normally pretty rational folks, send all their criminals there if it is was so wonderful?
Are we there yet?

  • MSG
Re: No such domain
Reply #40
If your home was getting constantly knocked down and your kids run over by cars, you'd be cranky too
Obviously, MSG has never been killed by the Aussie wildlife.
Until he or she has, I suggest we ignore his or her comments.
Those of Osmanthus as well.
Obvious shills for the Aussie tourism and real estate industries.

I mean, why would the Brits, normally pretty rational folks, send all their criminals there if it is was so wonderful?
the flaw in your argument is pretty easy to spot, but then you're American so
braying among the ruins