Skip to main content

TR Memescape

  • Talk Rational: every hole's a goal

Topic: The Cool Science Image Thread (Read 653 times) previous topic - next topic

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
  • Doobie Keebler
  • Ridiculous Callipygous
The Cool Science Image Thread


Orbits of Potentially Hazardous Asteroids
Quote
Explanation: Are asteroids dangerous? Some are, but the likelihood of a dangerous asteroid striking the Earth during any given year is low. Because some past mass extinction events have been linked to asteroid impacts, however, humanity has made it a priority to find and catalog those asteroids that may one day affect life on Earth. Pictured above are the orbits of the over 1,000 known Potentially Hazardous Asteroids (PHAs). These documented tumbling boulders of rock and ice are over 140 meters across and will pass within 7.5 million kilometers of Earth -- about 20 times the distance to the Moon. Although none of them will strike the Earth in the next 100 years -- not all PHAs have been discovered, and past 100 years, many orbits become hard to predict. Were an asteroid of this size to impact the Earth, it could raise dangerous tsunamis, for example. Of course rocks and ice bits of much smaller size strike the Earth every day, usually pose no danger, and sometimes creating memorable fireball and meteor displays.
"I'm over 70 and have never seen such , arrogance, incompetence and Ill -intentions as this President and his aids."    The Dotard     (posted 12 days after his 68th birthday)

  • MikeS
Re: The Cool Science Image Thread
Reply #1
Which one is named "Trump"?

Plus, obligatory rimshot reply ....

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LbvmKzf_wr4


  • Doobie Keebler
  • Ridiculous Callipygous
Re: The Cool Science Image Thread
Reply #2
"I'm over 70 and have never seen such , arrogance, incompetence and Ill -intentions as this President and his aids."    The Dotard     (posted 12 days after his 68th birthday)

  • Doobie Keebler
  • Ridiculous Callipygous
Re: The Cool Science Image Thread
Reply #3


"I'm over 70 and have never seen such , arrogance, incompetence and Ill -intentions as this President and his aids."    The Dotard     (posted 12 days after his 68th birthday)

  • Bilirubin
  • Ain't nothing ta fuck wit'

  • F X
  • The one and only
Re: The Cool Science Image Thread
Reply #5
"If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and man."
― Mark Twain 🔭

  • MikeS
Re: The Cool Science Image Thread
Reply #6
Needs sound effects ...

Pew, Pew ... Pew

  • Bilirubin
  • Ain't nothing ta fuck wit'

  • F X
  • The one and only
Re: The Cool Science Image Thread
Reply #8
"If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and man."
― Mark Twain 🔭

Re: The Cool Science Image Thread
Reply #9

Re: The Cool Science Image Thread
Reply #10

  • Bilirubin
  • Ain't nothing ta fuck wit'
Re: The Cool Science Image Thread
Reply #11
Shepherd moon?

  • Bilirubin
  • Ain't nothing ta fuck wit'
Re: The Cool Science Image Thread
Reply #12

Looks like something hit the shit out of that thing at some point

Re: The Cool Science Image Thread
Reply #13
Hyperion's density and porosity is somewhere between styrofoam and laundry lint. Impacts tend to compress the surface material rather than excavate it.

  • F X
  • The one and only
Re: The Cool Science Image Thread
Reply #14
Sahara snow from the Modis satellite data  Jan 21 2017



https://worldview.earthdata.nasa.gov/

reference shot from Google Earth

"If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and man."
― Mark Twain 🔭

  • Doobie Keebler
  • Ridiculous Callipygous
Re: The Cool Science Image Thread
Reply #15
"I'm over 70 and have never seen such , arrogance, incompetence and Ill -intentions as this President and his aids."    The Dotard     (posted 12 days after his 68th birthday)

  • Monad
Re: The Cool Science Image Thread
Reply #16

  • Monad
Re: The Cool Science Image Thread
Reply #17

  • Doobie Keebler
  • Ridiculous Callipygous
Re: The Cool Science Image Thread
Reply #18
"I'm over 70 and have never seen such , arrogance, incompetence and Ill -intentions as this President and his aids."    The Dotard     (posted 12 days after his 68th birthday)

  • F X
  • The one and only
Re: The Cool Science Image Thread
Reply #19
"If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and man."
― Mark Twain 🔭

Re: The Cool Science Image Thread
Reply #20


Explanation: Is that a spaceship or a cloud? Although it may seem like an alien mothership, it's actually a impressive thunderstorm cloud called a supercell. Such colossal storm systems center on mesocyclones -- rotating updrafts that can span several kilometers and deliver torrential rain and high winds including tornadoes. Jagged sculptured clouds adorn the supercell's edge, while wind swept dust and rain dominate the center. A tree waits patiently in the foreground. The above supercell cloud was photographed in 2010 July west of Glasgow, Montana, USA, caused minor damage, and lasted several hours before moving on.

Link

Re: The Cool Science Image Thread
Reply #21


Explanation: What's happening to the rings of Saturn? Nothing much, just a little moon making waves. The moon is 8-kilometer Daphnis and it is making waves in the Keeler Gap of Saturn's rings using just its gravity -- as it bobs up and down, in and out. The featured image is a wide-field version of a previously released image taken last month by the robotic Cassini spacecraft during one of its new Grand Finale orbits. Daphnis can be seen on the far right, sporting ridges likely accumulated from ring particles. Daphnis was discovered in Cassini images in 2005 and raised mounds of ring particles so high in 2009 -- during Saturn's equinox when the ring plane pointed directly at the Sun -- that they cast notable shadows.

Link

Re: The Cool Science Image Thread
Reply #22


WHEN LIGHTNING STRIKES  One day last summer, Your Shot photographer David Rankin captured the precise moment a bolt of lighting from a powerful storm hit the Vermilion Cliffs in southern Utah and northern Arizona.

Link

Re: The Cool Science Image Thread
Reply #23

  • Doobie Keebler
  • Ridiculous Callipygous
Re: The Cool Science Image Thread
Reply #24


ITAP: closeup of the engine and solid rocket motors that power the Delta IV Medium+ (5,4) rocket

Quote
This is a closeup image of the Aerojet Rocketdyne RS-68A engine (center engine) and four (two on each side) Orbital ATK GEM-60 solid rocket motors that power United Launch Alliance's Delta IV Medium+ (5,4) rocket. This past Saturday, this Delta IV launched the 9th Wideband Global SATCOM satellite (WGS-9) for the USAF.

I shoot for AmericaSpace as a launch photographer; before most launches from Cape Canaveral, other members of the media and I are escorted to the launchpads on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station to setup "remote" cameras. (I'm not credentialed for all of them--long story.)

This image was taken with a Nikon D3300, Nikon 55-300mm f/4.5-5.6 lens (at 80mm) and was the shot was triggered by a Vela Pop sound trigger, as I watched the launch from ~2.5 miles away; the sound would kill anyone this close. The camera was about 300ft from the rocket, its tripod was staked down using tent stakes, and there was a plastic bag around the camera to protect it from weather and the rocket itself.

Settings: 1/4000 f/13 ISO 100 - many other photographers have successfully executed these shots in the past, and I used their EXIF data as reference, but I opted to underexposed even further to properly expose the extremely bright exhaust. The D3300 has surprisingly good dynamic range and I was able to pull up the shadows in LR.

I've been taking rocket launch images for about two years and have had up-close access for about a year, but this is probably my favorite shot I've ever taken.

Thanks for viewing; feel free to ask anything about the setup or the launch!

Personal stuff below :)

Instagram: @johnkrausphotos - I'm doing the 365 day daily photo challenge after completing it last year. No missed days; feel free to follow for daily content :)

Website

Flickr, which hosts solely my daily photo images from this year.
  • Last Edit: March 24, 2017, 01:47:55 AM by Doobie Keebler
"I'm over 70 and have never seen such , arrogance, incompetence and Ill -intentions as this President and his aids."    The Dotard     (posted 12 days after his 68th birthday)

Re: The Cool Science Image Thread
Reply #25
King of Wings Hoodoo under the Milky Way

Quote
Explanation: This rock structure is not only surreal -- it's real. The reason it's not more famous is that it is, perhaps, smaller than one might guess: the capstone rock overhangs only a few meters. Even so, the King of Wings outcrop, located in New Mexico, USA, is a fascinating example of an unusual type of rock structure called a hoodoo. Hoodoos may form when a layer of hard rock overlays a layer of eroding softer rock. Figuring out the details of incorporating this hoodoo into a night-sky photoshoot took over a year. Besides waiting for a suitably picturesque night behind a sky with few clouds, the foreground had to be artificially lit just right relative to the natural glow of the background. After much planning and waiting, the final shot, featured here, was taken in May 2016. Mimicking the horizontal bar, the background sky features the band of our Milky Way Galaxy stretching overhead.



ETA:
More pictures here
Spoiler (click to show/hide)
  • Last Edit: April 05, 2017, 05:26:40 AM by thatsneakyguy

Re: The Cool Science Image Thread
Reply #26
Saturn in Infrared from Cassini

Quote
Explanation: Many details of Saturn appear clearly in infrared light. Bands of clouds show great structure, including long stretching storms. Also quite striking in infrared is the unusual hexagonal cloud pattern surrounding Saturn's North Pole. Each side of the dark hexagon spans roughly the width of our Earth. The hexagon's existence was not predicted, and its origin and likely stability remains a topic of research. Saturn's famous rings circle the planet and cast shadows below the equator. The featured image was taken by the robotic Cassini spacecraft in 2014 in several infrared colors -- but only processed recently. In September, Cassini's mission will be brought to a dramatic conclusion as the spacecraft will be directed to dive into ringed giant.


  • MikeS
Re: The Cool Science Image Thread
Reply #27

  • F X
  • The one and only
Re: The Cool Science Image Thread
Reply #28
"If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and man."
― Mark Twain 🔭

Re: The Cool Science Image Thread
Reply #29
Quote
Explanation: Mt. Etna has been erupting for hundreds of thousands of years. Located in Sicily, Italy, the volcano produces lava fountains over one kilometer high. Mt. Etna is not only one of the most active volcanoes on Earth, it is one of the largest, measuring over 50 kilometers at its base and rising nearly 3 kilometers high. Pictured in mid-March, a spectacular lava plume erupts upwards, dangerous molten volcanic bombs fly off to the sides, while hot lava flows down the volcano's exterior. The Earth's rotation is discernable on this carefully time, moon-lit, long duration image as star trails.



https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/astropix.html

Re: The Cool Science Image Thread
Reply #30
Quote
Explanation: What's happened to Comet Lovejoy? In the pictured image, a processed composite, the comet was captured early this month after brightening unexpectedly and sporting a long and intricate ion tail. Remarkably, the typically complex effect of the Sun's wind and magnetic field here caused the middle of Comet Lovejoy's ion tail to resemble the head of a needle. Comet C/2017 E4 (Lovejoy) was discovered only last month by noted comet discoverer Terry Lovejoy. The comet reached visual magnitude 7 earlier this month, making it a good target for binoculars and long duration exposure cameras. What's happened to Comet Lovejoy (E4) since this image was taken might be considered even more remarkable -- the comet's nucleus appeared to be disintegrating and fading as it neared its closest approach to the Sun two days ago.



https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap170425.html

Re: The Cool Science Image Thread
Reply #31
Quote
Explanation: What glows in the night? This night, several unusual glows were evident -- some near, but some far. The foreground surf glimmers blue with the light of bioluminescent plankton. Next out, Earth's atmosphere dims the horizon and provides a few opaque clouds. Farther out, the planet Venus glows bright near the image center. If you slightly avert your eyes, a diagonal beam of light will stand out crossing behind Venus. This band is zodiacal light, sunlight scattered by dust in our Solar System. Much farther away are numerous single bright stars, most closer than 100 light years away. Farthest away, also rising diagonally and making a "V" with the zodiacal light, is the central band of our Milky Way Galaxy. Most of the billions of Milky Way stars and dark clouds are thousands of light years away. The featured image was taken last November on the Iranian coast of Gulf of Oman.



https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap170418.html

  • Doobie Keebler
  • Ridiculous Callipygous
Re: The Cool Science Image Thread
Reply #32


A developing thunderstorm climbs high into the atmosphere over the Pacific Ocean south of Panama. (Santiago Borja)


Pilot captures incredible nighttime thunderstorm photo over the Pacific Ocean

Quote
This is one of the most striking thunderstorm photos we've seen.

Taken from a plane at the moment of a lightning flash, it illustrates both the ferocity of a turbulent atmosphere and the beauty of Mother Nature. A strong, roiling updraft; a smooth, flat anvil; and the overshooting top -- all features of intense developing thunderstorms.

The photo was taken over the Pacific Ocean from the cockpit of an airplane. The photographer and pilot, Santiago Borja, says he was circling around it at 37,000 feet altitude en route to South America when he captured this spectacular view.

Borja said it was difficult to get the shot in near-darkness and during a bumpy ride. "Storms are tricky because the lightning is so fast, there is no tripod and there is a lot of reflection from inside lights," Borja told The Washington Post in an email.

"I like this photo so much because you can feel the amazing size of the storm and its power," Borja said. "But at the same time it's wonderful how peacefully you can fly around it in still air without touching it."

The photo was taken with his Nikon D750 camera south of Panama on a Boeing 767-300.

"I primarily enjoy nature, landscape and cityscape photography," Borja said. "Since I carry my camera everywhere, I started trying to capture storms and in-flight experiences some time ago combining my two greatest passions: flying and photography."

More of Santiago Borja's work at  http://www.santiagoborja.com  and  https://www.instagram.com/santiagoborja

"I'm over 70 and have never seen such , arrogance, incompetence and Ill -intentions as this President and his aids."    The Dotard     (posted 12 days after his 68th birthday)

  • MSG
Re: The Cool Science Image Thread
Reply #33
Love it!
braying among the ruins

  • Doobie Keebler
  • Ridiculous Callipygous
Re: The Cool Science Image Thread
Reply #34


It was once thought that sperm whales were hemispherical sleepers, one half of the brain rested while the other remained active. Newer research has shown that this is not the case and that in fact they, like us, go full on snooze mode for an average of fifteen minutes or so and even enter REM sleep during that time.

My favorite part of the image is the calf in the lower left nursing while Mom sleeps.

https://www.nature.com/news/2008/080221/full/news.2008.613.html


  • Last Edit: July 12, 2017, 07:31:48 AM by Doobie Keebler
"I'm over 70 and have never seen such , arrogance, incompetence and Ill -intentions as this President and his aids."    The Dotard     (posted 12 days after his 68th birthday)

  • MikeS
Re: The Cool Science Image Thread
Reply #35
It reminds me of Easter Island statues.

  • F X
  • The one and only
Re: The Cool Science Image Thread
Reply #36
"If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and man."
― Mark Twain 🔭

  • SkepticTank
  • Global Moderator
  • Calmer than you are

  • Doobie Keebler
  • Ridiculous Callipygous
Re: The Cool Science Image Thread
Reply #38


This is the release of a Cygnus supply vehicle from the ISS. it's probably obvious but it's worth mentioning that the .gif runs a few times faster than it actually occurs in reality. Once the Cygnus is unloaded of supplies and new equipment it is then packed with retired equipment, trash, and other waste that along with the module will burn up during reentry over the South Pacific.

The release and reentry procedure is kinda cool. (IIRC, this is how it was explained) As you can see in the end of the .gif the Cygnus is speeding up and climbing to a slightly higher orbit. Once it reaches that new orbit it uses what remains of the thruster fuel to slow it's orbital speed and adjust it's trajectory to a shallow reentry for a long slow burn. As the Cygnus slows down the ISS actually passes under it, then as the Cygnus' new trajectory causes it to gain speed it catches up to and passes under the ISS. ( I looked for an illustration of the orbital paths but couldn't find one  :sadcheer: ) At this point the ISS, as well as a ground-based observational unit, are in a position to observe and record the data from the destructive reentry. This data is being collected and will available to engineers that will be planning the eventual retirement and intentional destructive reentry of the ISS itself.





  • Last Edit: July 18, 2017, 09:20:36 AM by Doobie Keebler
"I'm over 70 and have never seen such , arrogance, incompetence and Ill -intentions as this President and his aids."    The Dotard     (posted 12 days after his 68th birthday)

  • Doobie Keebler
  • Ridiculous Callipygous
Re: The Cool Science Image Thread
Reply #39
"I'm over 70 and have never seen such , arrogance, incompetence and Ill -intentions as this President and his aids."    The Dotard     (posted 12 days after his 68th birthday)

  • Doobie Keebler
  • Ridiculous Callipygous
Re: The Cool Science Image Thread
Reply #40


Checkmate NASA!

"I'm over 70 and have never seen such , arrogance, incompetence and Ill -intentions as this President and his aids."    The Dotard     (posted 12 days after his 68th birthday)