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TR Memescape

  • Talkrational: To me it is above all an honest site: honest fun, honest kindness (a lot of it, once you start looking), honest anger, honest stupidity, honest lunacy, honest hostility, honest viciousness. Honest brawls and meltdowns. Altogether a remarkably interesting - if sometimes downright disturbing - bunch of people speaking their minds.

Recent Posts

1
  They are like the Democrats and the Media who only care about their selfish agendas ... not truth.
I doubt you understand the density of the irony packed into those few words.
But I doubt anyone else fails to.

I do believe you are the most hypocritical human I have ever encountered in my entire life.
2
What The Fuck Dave. :smug:
Quote
Choose your feed wisely.
Lactating does and does in late pregnancy have higher nutritional needs than dry does, wethers, or bucks. They will need supplemental feed beyond grass hay and browse in order to maintain their body condition and produce milk. Alfalfa, which is technically a legume and not a grass, is needed for them to meet their bodies' high demand for calcium. Some areas of the country can find alfalfa hay, but it can be difficult to find in some locations. In my location, the best source for alfalfa is in pellet form or Chaffhaye. Choose a brand with pellets that have a low amount of dust and a good green color (not a dull brownish shade). I prefer Standlee brand alfalfa pellets.
Lactating does also need some amount of grain. Grain will be a small portion of the diet, because while the does will only receive grain once or twice a day on the milk stand, they will be eating browse or hay all day long. Supplementing an animal with grain when it makes sense and is necessary is not going to be detrimental to the animal or to you; in fact, it will be beneficial because it will keep the animal in good condition and support a higher level of production. This is not the same as sticking your goats on dry lot and feeding them nothing but grain, which will definitely impact the health of the animal and the quality of the milk.
You should still choose good sources of grain. I prefer to stay away from soy, and so I have transitioned my girls from a premade goat pellet to a hand made mix. I am loosely following the recipe #3 on the Land of Havilah website. I recommend staying away from soy for a number of reasons, but if mixing your own is out of the question for you, you can look for soy-free brands. If this is also impossible for you, avoid sweet feeds with high molasses contents and provide a pellet formulated for goats.

ETA: Dave, you suck at reading and science.

They are wrong.

Most of what you read about Animal Science is wrong.

In fact, most of what you read in the much broader category of Life Sciences is wrong.

And you know this how?
3
The problem I have with using even a small amount of commercial grain though is that all the grain around my area requires TILLAGE.  And tillage destroys topsoil. And my goats lactate just fine and are perfectly healthy without it ... they produce less milk but so what?  I'm not trying to win the Indy 500 of Milk Production.
You could grow barley and wheat, no till, and harvest it yourself! Then you could even make your own bread.
Might be fun at some point after I get the animal thing all figured out, yeah.
Hell, you can just buy a bag of chicken scratch and toss it on a 20x20 plot and harvest in the fall. Not sure how you'd thresh the different grains but it would be easy for goat food. You could just turn it into hay with the seedheads intact!
4
And the REASON it's wrong is because most of what you read involves SELLING SOMETHING in some way.

SALES drives so much error in our world today.  And most selling is based on half truths, spin and manipulation.
5
Spoiler (click to show/hide)
What stupid comment did Dave make?  TRAP SPRUNG!!!111eleventy!!
Dave no read so good.
yeah. I guess it was a trap. I didn't really think of it that way though because I knew he would say it supported his views because it's about switching goats to pasture fed.
Once you understand the laws that Dave operates on, hacking him is apparently easy.  Understand, I'm not diminishing the lulz here,   I just think more people could enjoy this DaveHack if they try it.
6
What The Fuck Dave. :smug:
Quote
Choose your feed wisely.
Lactating does and does in late pregnancy have higher nutritional needs than dry does, wethers, or bucks. They will need supplemental feed beyond grass hay and browse in order to maintain their body condition and produce milk. Alfalfa, which is technically a legume and not a grass, is needed for them to meet their bodies' high demand for calcium. Some areas of the country can find alfalfa hay, but it can be difficult to find in some locations. In my location, the best source for alfalfa is in pellet form or Chaffhaye. Choose a brand with pellets that have a low amount of dust and a good green color (not a dull brownish shade). I prefer Standlee brand alfalfa pellets.
Lactating does also need some amount of grain. Grain will be a small portion of the diet, because while the does will only receive grain once or twice a day on the milk stand, they will be eating browse or hay all day long. Supplementing an animal with grain when it makes sense and is necessary is not going to be detrimental to the animal or to you; in fact, it will be beneficial because it will keep the animal in good condition and support a higher level of production. This is not the same as sticking your goats on dry lot and feeding them nothing but grain, which will definitely impact the health of the animal and the quality of the milk.
You should still choose good sources of grain. I prefer to stay away from soy, and so I have transitioned my girls from a premade goat pellet to a hand made mix. I am loosely following the recipe #3 on the Land of Havilah website. I recommend staying away from soy for a number of reasons, but if mixing your own is out of the question for you, you can look for soy-free brands. If this is also impossible for you, avoid sweet feeds with high molasses contents and provide a pellet formulated for goats.

ETA: Dave, you suck at reading and science.

They are wrong.

Most of what you read about Animal Science is wrong.

In fact, most of what you read in the much broader category of Life Sciences is wrong.
7
Dave, did you really shoo me off to another topic to avoid discussing C14, just like everyone thought you would?
You are easy to predict.
Well, answering questions is a duty for everyone but Dave.
8
The problem I have with using even a small amount of commercial grain though is that all the grain around my area requires TILLAGE.  And tillage destroys topsoil. And my goats lactate just fine and are perfectly healthy without it ... they produce less milk but so what?  I'm not trying to win the Indy 500 of Milk Production.
You could grow barley and wheat, no till, and harvest it yourself! Then you could even make your own bread.
Might be fun at some point after I get the animal thing all figured out, yeah.
9
I'm not pretending.  It DOES support my argument.  As for your bacteria argument, I never even bothered to try to understand it.  Why should I?  Maybe you should sell me on why I should be interested in that.
Yet you quoted a snippet from it, stripped of context, as if it supported your position.

And you don't see a problem with that.

It's not JUST that you suck at science; you also have to be a complete ass about it.
10
What The Fuck Dave. :smug:
Quote
Choose your feed wisely.
Lactating does and does in late pregnancy have higher nutritional needs than dry does, wethers, or bucks. They will need supplemental feed beyond grass hay and browse in order to maintain their body condition and produce milk. Alfalfa, which is technically a legume and not a grass, is needed for them to meet their bodies' high demand for calcium. Some areas of the country can find alfalfa hay, but it can be difficult to find in some locations. In my location, the best source for alfalfa is in pellet form or Chaffhaye. Choose a brand with pellets that have a low amount of dust and a good green color (not a dull brownish shade). I prefer Standlee brand alfalfa pellets.
Lactating does also need some amount of grain. Grain will be a small portion of the diet, because while the does will only receive grain once or twice a day on the milk stand, they will be eating browse or hay all day long. Supplementing an animal with grain when it makes sense and is necessary is not going to be detrimental to the animal or to you; in fact, it will be beneficial because it will keep the animal in good condition and support a higher level of production. This is not the same as sticking your goats on dry lot and feeding them nothing but grain, which will definitely impact the health of the animal and the quality of the milk.
You should still choose good sources of grain. I prefer to stay away from soy, and so I have transitioned my girls from a premade goat pellet to a hand made mix. I am loosely following the recipe #3 on the Land of Havilah website. I recommend staying away from soy for a number of reasons, but if mixing your own is out of the question for you, you can look for soy-free brands. If this is also impossible for you, avoid sweet feeds with high molasses contents and provide a pellet formulated for goats.

ETA: Dave, you suck at reading and science.