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Topic: The 'Missing Link' of Meteorology's Theory of Storms (Read 1312 times) previous topic - next topic

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Re: The 'Missing Link' of Meteorology's Theory of Storms
Reply #125
Poor Jim didn't realize that arguing against a phase diagram was going to be a hilarious fail.

I saw no evidence that he understood the basics of phase relations, e.g. that boiling point varies with ambient pressure. He seemed to think that 100 C was the boiling point of water regardless of pressure. He certainly didn't understand that the gas phase can exist at less than the boiling point.

It would have been interesting to have him boil potatoes at my house (8400 feet above sea level) and see what kind of creative explanations he would come up with to explain why it takes them so much longer to cook than it would at sea level.

  • MikeS
  • Needs a Life
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Re: The 'Missing Link' of Meteorology's Theory of Storms
Reply #126
Poor Jim didn't realize that arguing against a phase diagram was going to be a hilarious fail.

I saw no evidence that he understood the basics of phase relations, e.g. that boiling point varies with ambient pressure. He seemed to think that 100 C was the boiling point of water regardless of pressure. He certainly didn't understand that the gas phase can exist at less than the boiling point.

It would have been interesting to have him boil potatoes at my house (8400 feet above sea level) and see what kind of creative explanations he would come up with to explain why it takes them so much longer to cook than it would at sea level.
Wow, that's up there.  Looked at your profile (Central City, CO) and didn't realize there were towns that high in the Rockies.

Looking at Google Maps, it looks like an old mining town turned into Casino destination with tailings piles all over.  Is this gold/silver country?  Or some other gems or rare earth deposit?

  • 12

  • 6

Re: The 'Missing Link' of Meteorology's Theory of Storms
Reply #127
Poor Jim didn't realize that arguing against a phase diagram was going to be a hilarious fail.

I saw no evidence that he understood the basics of phase relations, e.g. that boiling point varies with ambient pressure. He seemed to think that 100 C was the boiling point of water regardless of pressure. He certainly didn't understand that the gas phase can exist at less than the boiling point.

It would have been interesting to have him boil potatoes at my house (8400 feet above sea level) and see what kind of creative explanations he would come up with to explain why it takes them so much longer to cook than it would at sea level.
Wow, that's up there.  Looked at your profile (Central City, CO) and didn't realize there were towns that high in the Rockies.

Looking at Google Maps, it looks like an old mining town turned into Casino destination with tailings piles all over.  Is this gold/silver country?  Or some other gems or rare earth deposit?
Poor Jim didn't realize that arguing against a phase diagram was going to be a hilarious fail.

I saw no evidence that he understood the basics of phase relations, e.g. that boiling point varies with ambient pressure. He seemed to think that 100 C was the boiling point of water regardless of pressure. He certainly didn't understand that the gas phase can exist at less than the boiling point.

It would have been interesting to have him boil potatoes at my house (8400 feet above sea level) and see what kind of creative explanations he would come up with to explain why it takes them so much longer to cook than it would at sea level.
Wow, that's up there.  Looked at your profile (Central City, CO) and didn't realize there were towns that high in the Rockies.

Looking at Google Maps, it looks like an old mining town turned into Casino destination with tailings piles all over.  Is this gold/silver country?  Or some other gems or rare earth deposit?

Mostly gold. It was one of the first areas mined in the Colorado gold rush (1859). 8400 isn't that high. There's a couple towns in Colorado over 10,000, and lots of them 8000-9000.