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Topic: The 'Missing Link' of Meteorology's Theory of Storms (Read 1259 times) previous topic - next topic

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  • MikeB
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Re: The 'Missing Link' of Meteorology's Theory of Storms
Reply #50
I think I get this.

Jim thinks water vapor in the atmosphere does not exist as h2o molecules.
Instead he thinks it is a plasma

I think we should take his idea seriously, and turn off all electrically powered devices on humid days. I also wouldn't stand under power lines. :D
I thought that he had written that he thought water could not exist in the atmosphere, below 100C, as individual molecules.  Water can only exist as small, maybe very small, droplets, which is why he gained the secret knowledge that moist air is denser than dry air (temperature and pressure being equal for both).

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Re: The 'Missing Link' of Meteorology's Theory of Storms
Reply #51
Maybe that too. It's pretty garbled.
"That which can be asserted with evidence can also be dismissed without evidence." (Dave Hawkins)

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Re: The 'Missing Link' of Meteorology's Theory of Storms
Reply #52
Jimmy? Garbled? Noooo....  :no:   :no:   :no:
braying among the ruins

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Re: The 'Missing Link' of Meteorology's Theory of Storms
Reply #53
Hail is a lie!

  • fredbear
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Re: The 'Missing Link' of Meteorology's Theory of Storms
Reply #54
Who's the smartARSE?
"...without considering any evidence at all - that my views are more likely - on average - to be correct.  Because the mainstream is almost always wrong" - Dave Hawkins

  • osmanthus
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Re: The 'Missing Link' of Meteorology's Theory of Storms
Reply #55
Blame Fenrir.
Truth is out of style

  • MikeB
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Re: The 'Missing Link' of Meteorology's Theory of Storms
Reply #56
Hail yeah.

  • Fenrir
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Re: The 'Missing Link' of Meteorology's Theory of Storms
Reply #57
 :wave:
It's what plants crave.

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Re: The 'Missing Link' of Meteorology's Theory of Storms
Reply #58
Once again, a beautiful theory is destroyed by and ugly fact:
The boiling temperature of H2O is too high to exist as gas in our atmosphere.  Therefore moist air is alway heavier than dry air.  Convection is refuted. 

LOL.

You are under the impression that since the boiling temperature of water is 100 °C, that if the air temperature is say 20 °C that no vapour could exist? 


Vapour can exist.  Not gaseous H2O.  See steam tables for verification.


You are completely wrong. 


I am right.


 The molecules in and on the surface of the liquid in equilibrium with air temperature have on average the kinetic energy equivalent to the 20 °C scale, but individual molecules near the surface are not bound by liquid on one side, and can and do break free as vapour all the time.  Did you never study statistical distributions in whatever you thought was "science"?  The molecules leaving the fluid and entering the air as vapour will do so until equilibrium is reached with the equilibrium vapour pressure in the air.


You are confused.  Vapor is not gaseous.  Its still liquid.

Your three sentences after your colon are false, and non-sequiturs to boot.

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Re: The 'Missing Link' of Meteorology's Theory of Storms
Reply #59
I could measure it with my DSC.  What are you on about?

You should write a paper on it.

And where does rain come from?

above.



  • osmanthus
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Re: The 'Missing Link' of Meteorology's Theory of Storms
Reply #60
FFS Jim, can you apply your amazing levels of intelligence to making proper use of basic software functionality? Surely that is not too strenuous for such a genius. Most kids can manage it.
Truth is out of style

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Re: The 'Missing Link' of Meteorology's Theory of Storms
Reply #61
I think I get this.

Jim thinks water vapor in the atmosphere does not exist as h2o molecules.
Instead he thinks it is a plasma

I think we should take his idea seriously, and turn off all electrically powered devices on humid days. I also wouldn't stand under power lines. :D
I thought that he had written that he thought water could not exist in the atmosphere, below 100C, as individual molecules.  Water can only exist as small, maybe very small, droplets, which is why he gained the secret knowledge that moist air is denser than dry air (temperature and pressure being equal for both).

Any idiot can read a steam table.  Can you reveal the secret knowledge of cold steam?

Go ahead, tell us.   What are you waiting for.

You frauds got nothing.

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Re: The 'Missing Link' of Meteorology's Theory of Storms
Reply #62
I think I get this.

Jim thinks water vapor in the atmosphere does not exist as h2o molecules.
Instead he thinks it is a plasma

I think we should take his idea seriously, and turn off all electrically powered devices on humid days. I also wouldn't stand under power lines. :D

You fruitcakes can't follow a mildly complex presentation.

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Re: The 'Missing Link' of Meteorology's Theory of Storms
Reply #63
Quote
I thought that he had written that he thought water could not exist in the atmosphere, below 100C, as individual molecules.  Water can only exist as small, maybe very small, droplets,
skepticalscience says when the atmosphere is warmer, there is more water vapor in the air.  This is why deserts are so moist, and the cooler boreal forest region is so dry.

Science bitches.

Quote
The amount of water vapor in the atmosphere exists in direct relation to the temperature. If you increase the temperature, more water evaporates and becomes vapor, and vice versa.
https://skepticalscience.com/water-vapor-greenhouse-gas.htm

You can't deny it.
"If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and man."
― Mark Twain 🔭

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Re: The 'Missing Link' of Meteorology's Theory of Storms
Reply #64
Spoiler (click to show/hide)
  • Last Edit: March 07, 2017, 12:29:38 PM by osmanthus

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Re: The 'Missing Link' of Meteorology's Theory of Storms
Reply #65
Quote
I thought that he had written that he thought water could not exist in the atmosphere, below 100C, as individual molecules.  Water can only exist as small, maybe very small, droplets,
skepticalscience says when the atmosphere is warmer, there is more water vapor in the air.  This is why deserts are so moist, and the cooler boreal forest region is so dry.

Science bitches.

Quote
The amount of water vapor in the atmosphere exists in direct relation to the temperature. If you increase the temperature, more water evaporates and becomes vapor, and vice versa.
https://skepticalscience.com/water-vapor-greenhouse-gas.htm

You can't deny it.
Lol.
Love is like a magic penny
 if you hold it tight you won't have any
if you give it away you'll have so many
they'll be rolling all over the floor

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Re: The 'Missing Link' of Meteorology's Theory of Storms
Reply #66
Quote
I thought that he had written that he thought water could not exist in the atmosphere, below 100C, as individual molecules.  Water can only exist as small, maybe very small, droplets,
skepticalscience says when the atmosphere is warmer, there is more water vapor in the air.  This is why deserts are so moist, and the cooler boreal forest region is so dry.

Science bitches.

Quote
The amount of water vapor in the atmosphere exists in direct relation to the temperature. If you increase the temperature, more water evaporates and becomes vapor, and vice versa.
https://skepticalscience.com/water-vapor-greenhouse-gas.htm

You can't deny it.

Common knowledge.

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Re: The 'Missing Link' of Meteorology's Theory of Storms
Reply #67
I think I get this.

Jim thinks water vapor in the atmosphere does not exist as h2o molecules.
Instead he thinks it is a plasma

I think we should take his idea seriously, and turn off all electrically powered devices on humid days. I also wouldn't stand under power lines. :D
I thought that he had written that he thought water could not exist in the atmosphere, below 100C, as individual molecules.


Not me.


  Water can only exist as small, maybe very small, droplets, which is why he gained the secret knowledge that moist air is denser than dry air (temperature and pressure being equal for both).

Do the math.

James McGinn / Solving Tornadoes

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Re: The 'Missing Link' of Meteorology's Theory of Storms
Reply #68
"If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and man."
― Mark Twain 🔭

  • fredbear
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Re: The 'Missing Link' of Meteorology's Theory of Storms
Reply #69
Unsubscribe
"...without considering any evidence at all - that my views are more likely - on average - to be correct.  Because the mainstream is almost always wrong" - Dave Hawkins

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We all grow up believing that the moisture in clear air is gaseous
Reply #70
We all grow up believing that the moisture in clear air is gaseous
Postby jimmcginn » Thu Oct 13, 2016 12:31 pm

We all grow up believing that the moisture in clear air is gaseous

Most of us have at least enough education to realize the boiling point of water is much higher than that of our ambient environment. And most of us realize that boiling has to do with a phase change from a liquid state of matter to a gaseous state of matter. Most of us reconcile this dichotomy by just not thinking about it. Some of us come up with rationalization to explain it away. But if you are going to do science you can't fall back on these excuses. You have to see things for what they actually are.

There is no gaseous H2O in earth's atmosphere.

Moist air is heavier than dry air.

Moist air convection is impossible.

Meteorology needs another way to explain the power of storms, why storms are wet, and how heavier moist air gets so high in earth's atmosphere.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LwSyalcoRAk

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dexlOvP7mPw

James McGinn
Solving Tornadoes

Please read the following thread before you respond:
http://www.thunderbolts.info/forum/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?f=10&t=16471

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Re: The 'Missing Link' of Meteorology's Theory of Storms
Reply #71
Why should I read a bunch of crackpots arguing with each other, when none if them are correct?
Why do I bother?

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Re: The 'Missing Link' of Meteorology's Theory of Storms
Reply #72
Most of us have at least enough education to realize the boiling point of water is much higher than that of our ambient environment. And most of us realize that boiling has to do with a phase change from a liquid state of matter to a gaseous state of matter. Most of us reconcile this dichotomy by just not thinking about it.
I'm pretty sure most of us reconcile it by understanding that boiling isn't the only type of liquid-to-gas phase change.

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Re: The 'Missing Link' of Meteorology's Theory of Storms
Reply #73
Why should I read a bunch of crackpots arguing with each other, when none if them are correct?

I can't even imagine how frustrating it must be to be so sure you are right and so completely unable to say how or why. 

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Re: The 'Missing Link' of Meteorology's Theory of Storms
Reply #74
Quote
I thought that he had written that he thought water could not exist in the atmosphere, below 100C, as individual molecules.  Water can only exist as small, maybe very small, droplets,
skepticalscience says when the atmosphere is warmer, there is more water vapor in the air.  This is why deserts are so moist, and the cooler boreal forest region is so dry.
Firstly, skepticalscience is a propaganda site paid for by Al Gore.  Secondly the capacity for air to hold moisture goes up dramatically with heat.  This causes the rate of evaporation in deserts to be very high--thus explaining the dryness.

See, you learned something.


Science bitches.

Quote
The amount of water vapor in the atmosphere exists in direct relation to the temperature. If you increase the temperature, more water evaporates and becomes vapor, and vice versa.
https://skepticalscience.com/water-vapor-greenhouse-gas.htm

You can't deny it.
Lol.