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Topic: Newly-discovered human organ  (Read 448 times) previous topic - next topic

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  • F X
  • The one and only
Newly-discovered human organ
Quote
One team had expected to find that the bile duct is surrounded by a hard, dense wall of tissue. But instead, they saw weird, unexplained patterns. They took their findings to Neil Theise, a pathologist at New York University School of Medicine.

Shock absorbers
When Theise used the same endomicroscopy device to look under the skin of his own nose, he saw a similar result. Further investigation of other organs suggested that these patterns are made by a type of fluid moving through channels that are everywhere in the body.

Theise reckons that every tissue in the body may be surrounded by a network of these channels, which essentially form an organ. The team estimate that the organ contains around a fifth of the total fluid volume of the human body. "We think they act as shock absorbers," says Theise.

This organ was likely never seen before because standard approaches for processing and visualising human tissue causes the channels to drain, and the collagen fibres that give the network its structure to collapse in on themselves. This would have made the channels appear like a hard wall of dense protective tissue, instead of a fluid-filled cushion.[/quote
https://www.newscientist.com/article/2164903-newly-discovered-human-organ-may-help-explain-how-cancer-spreads/

Mind blowing actually
"If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and man."
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  • F X
  • The one and only
Re: Newly-discovered human organ
Reply #1
If this is true, one fifth of the fluids in our bodies (and a huge organ that is everywhere) simply was unknown until now.

That is truly mind blowing.
"If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and man."
― Mark Twain 🔭

  • Monad
Re: Newly-discovered human organ
Reply #2

  • F X
  • The one and only
Re: Newly-discovered human organ
Reply #3
Huh, isn't this just a form of Areolar connective tissue?

http://www.ivyroses.com/HumanBody/Tissue/Tissue_Areolar-Tissue.php

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Loose_connective_tissue
I have no idea, but thanks for the links and info.  I find it hard to believe nobody has ever "discovered" this huge" organ" before.
"If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and man."
― Mark Twain 🔭

  • uncool
Re: Newly-discovered human organ
Reply #4
Huh, isn't this just a form of Areolar connective tissue?

http://www.ivyroses.com/HumanBody/Tissue/Tissue_Areolar-Tissue.php

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Loose_connective_tissue
I have no idea, but thanks for the links and info.  I find it hard to believe nobody has ever "discovered" this huge" organ" before.


...phrasing?

Re: Newly-discovered human organ
Reply #5
It was known all right, but because of the preparation methods for microscopy, it was regarded as just supporting, solid tissue. The way I read articles, new methods not crushing the samples revealed the inner, fluid filled, structures.

  • F X
  • The one and only
Re: Newly-discovered human organ
Reply #6
It was known all right, but because of the preparation methods for microscopy, it was regarded as just supporting, solid tissue. The way I read articles, new methods not crushing the samples revealed the inner, fluid filled, structures.
Yep (I read the actual paper)

It might have been better phrasing to describe this as "network of tissues and organs", which is still mind blowing
"If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and man."
― Mark Twain 🔭

  • meepmeep
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  • zombiecat queen
Re: Newly-discovered human organ
Reply #7
It was known all right, but because of the preparation methods for microscopy, it was regarded as just supporting, solid tissue. The way I read articles, new methods not crushing the samples revealed the inner, fluid filled, structures.

Maybe I've misunderstood what we've learned in school, but none of this sounds markedly different from what we've learned. Like, I never would've imagined that interstitial spaces aren't full of fluid despite what fixed slides look like. How else does lymphatic drainage occur?

https://www.the-scientist.com/?articles.view/articleNo/52168/title/Is-the-Interstitium-Really-a-New-Organ-/

Quote
"It is fair to say that histologists [and] pathologists have long known that there is an interstitial space and that it contains fluid," Anirban Maitra, a pathologist at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center who did not participate in the work, writes in an email to The Scientist. "The claim that it is a hitherto undiscovered organ, and the largest one ever at that, seems a stretch," he cautions.

"Most biologists would be reticent to put the moniker of an 'organ' on microscopic uneven spaces between tissues that contain fluid. By this definition, the abdominal cavity and pleural spaces should be discrete organs" too, says Maitra.

What strikes me as new is figuring out what some things might look like in vivo with specific imaging techniques and figuring out how much certain features of a traditional fixed H&E histo slide is artifact, but "new organ" sounds like bullshit.