Skip to main content

TR Memescape

  • Talkrational: crosspost me again and you'll draw back a stump

Topic: Enhanced food production utilizing rotational grazing (Read 104 times) previous topic - next topic

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
  • F X
  • The one and only
Enhanced food production utilizing rotational grazing
If it were a conversation with actual people, terms like "rotational grazing" and "enhance" would be defined and at least roughly quantified.

http://144.92.199.81/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/Management_IntensiveRotationalGrazing.pdf
Explains how and why rotational grazing enhances quality, for example proper management enhances "PUF, potential
utilizable forage and RFQ, relative forage quality"

http://www.mda.state.mn.us/animals/grazing.aspx
Explains what is meant by Rotational Grazing

https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/stelprdb1097378.pdf
Explains almost everything about it

https://www.premier1supplies.com/sheep-guide/2012/07/a-look-at-the-advantages-of-rotational-grazing/
Explains how it is an advantage

http://www.mda.state.mn.us/protecting/conservation/practices/grazing.aspx
More explaining


"If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and man."
― Mark Twain 🔭

  • F X
  • The one and only
Re: Enhanced food production utilizing rotational grazing
Reply #1
This topic was to avoid responding in the never ending and really long alt science thread, which I made the mistake of looking at.
"If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and man."
― Mark Twain 🔭

Re: Enhanced food production utilizing rotational grazing
Reply #2
Lol. I know how you feel. At this point that thread is more like a hangout for a long time group of regulars.
Love is like a magic penny
 if you hold it tight you won't have any
if you give it away you'll have so many
they'll be rolling all over the floor

  • F X
  • The one and only
Re: Enhanced food production utilizing rotational grazing
Reply #3
Yep, none of whom realize how insane they all sound at this point.
"If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and man."
― Mark Twain 🔭

Re: Enhanced food production utilizing rotational grazing
Reply #4
Yep, none of whom realize how insane they all sound at this point.
I don't think that's really a problem for any of us. Or, I mean we don't seem to personally feel any need to be self-conscious about it. After watching the same train wreck for ten years, there comes a point when you accept that you seem to enjoy this particular train wreck so you just go with it. The cart thread was like that for me. I saw it, got interested, saw the evidence, and didn't see the point in continuing but lots of others did. It's amazing you still have a crackpot there to stimulate the discussion but it's just a topic you all enjoy so the crackpot is just the medium for the conversation. It's a lot like staying in the Omelas I guess.
Love is like a magic penny
 if you hold it tight you won't have any
if you give it away you'll have so many
they'll be rolling all over the floor

  • Fenrir
Re: Enhanced food production utilizing rotational grazing
Reply #5
Yep, none of whom realize how insane they all sound at this point.

Pity reply.
It's what plants crave.

  • F X
  • The one and only
Re: Enhanced food production utilizing rotational grazing
Reply #6
In the detailed history of England, the agriculture section explained a situation that happened way back in the past.  (I can't get to it right now because it's packed up and in a closet)

This situation arose where a lot of farmers stopped raising food crops and instead let the fields go fallow and raised livestock instead, because it was much easier, cost less, and they could make much more money.  It became so detrimental to the farming situation (or rather the powers that be) that the Government had to act, to force crops to be grown, rather than everyone raising livestock.

I read it many years ago, but it was interesting.  It seems letting animals forage, and moving them from field to field, both increased the productivity of the plant life (from the manure and letting the fields naturally recover), and was low cost, compared to plowing, planting, weeding, harvesting and spreading manure for crops.

And it was lucrative, because the animals naturally reproduced, increasing in number, and each animal provided ready income in a variety of ways.  Wool, leather, milk, meat, even horses could be rented or used for mechanical work, the entire thing was explained as a problem, from an economic point of view, since grain and vegetables and even hay started being in short supply.  I should dig it out and read it again.

The issues of profit were varied, with crops being less risky, but better in the long run, while animals were a risk and more labor intensive (no days off), but for some reason the situation was such that more and more people started raising animals rather than food crops.  There was some explaining of how beneficial animals grazing was to the soil, unlike intensive crop raising, which depleted the fields.

It's actually an interesting subject,

"If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and man."
― Mark Twain 🔭

  • MikeS
Re: Enhanced food production utilizing rotational grazing
Reply #7
In the detailed history of England, the agriculture section explained a situation that happened way back in the past.  (I can't get to it right now because it's packed up and in a closet)

This situation arose where a lot of farmers stopped raising food crops and instead let the fields go fallow and raised livestock instead, because it was much easier, cost less, and they could make much more money.  It became so detrimental to the farming situation (or rather the powers that be) that the Government had to act, to force crops to be grown, rather than everyone raising livestock.

I read it many years ago, but it was interesting.  It seems letting animals forage, and moving them from field to field, both increased the productivity of the plant life (from the manure and letting the fields naturally recover), and was low cost, compared to plowing, planting, weeding, harvesting and spreading manure for crops.

And it was lucrative, because the animals naturally reproduced, increasing in number, and each animal provided ready income in a variety of ways.  Wool, leather, milk, meat, even horses could be rented or used for mechanical work, the entire thing was explained as a problem, from an economic point of view, since grain and vegetables and even hay started being in short supply.  I should dig it out and read it again.

The issues of profit were varied, with crops being less risky, but better in the long run, while animals were a risk and more labor intensive (no days off), but for some reason the situation was such that more and more people started raising animals rather than food crops.  There was some explaining of how beneficial animals grazing was to the soil, unlike intensive crop raising, which depleted the fields.

It's actually an interesting subject,


Nice story, but it's missing key components. 
- Prices of the different commodities
- Yields per acre for crops and for meat
- Percentage of fields fallow each year before/after

If your price differential is much more than the carrying capacity of the field then moving toward meat versus crops can be lucrative to the pocket book while non-impactful to the field.
For example, a corn crop will produce 10 tons/acre of biomass and you harvest the whole lot while removing 6 tons of material and leaving 4 tons of stalk/leaf/stover.  You remove 60% of the biomass every year.  Corn at $3/bushel yields ~$650/acre gross.
A animal eats 10% of its body weight per day but poops out 7-8%.  You end up removing only 30% of the biomass every year, and that is only if you graze the entire acre of all its biomass (not usually done) so expect less than 20% of the biomass is removed.  Also, "harvestable" meat is 50% of the removed biomass.  Meat at ~$1/lb yields ~$1,500/acre.

You could cut your herds in half, graze your property less and allow it to heal (or even lie fallow for a season) while still making money compared to corn (wheat equation is similar).