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  • After having my own comprehensively washed and fucked in 2011 I would never actively wish that on anyone.

Topic: We could use a Police Abuse sticky - Part 3 - Zombie Edition (Read 9144 times) previous topic - next topic

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Re: We could use a Police Abuse sticky - Part 3 - Zombie Edition
Reply #475
Love is like a magic penny
 if you hold it tight you won't have any
if you give it away you'll have so many
they'll be rolling all over the floor

  • uncool
Re: We could use a Police Abuse sticky - Part 3 - Zombie Edition
Reply #476

  • meepmeep
  • Administrator
  • zombiecat queen
Re: We could use a Police Abuse sticky - Part 3 - Zombie Edition
Reply #477
http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-sd-la-mesa-officer-20180121-story.html

Thank GOD the officer went home safe to his family!!!!!

  • meepmeep
  • Administrator
  • zombiecat queen
Re: We could use a Police Abuse sticky - Part 3 - Zombie Edition
Reply #478
Holy shit this is insane:

http://www.wbaltv.com/article/attorney-former-gun-squad-detective-took-money-but-it-wasnt-robbery/15859777

Quote
After opening statements, former gun squad Detective Maurice Ward detailed for the federal jury how members of the squad skimmed cash and drugs from people targeted or arrested. Ward's testimony revealed new details about the criminal activity of the gun squad and the way the squad operated.

Ward identified a duffle bag carried by former gun squad Sgt. Wayne Jenkins. In it, jurors were shown black plastic full face masks and ski masks. Jenkins also carried a BB gun for planting in the event the squad had a bad shooting, Ward said.

Ward described door pops, which is a technique used to scare groups of people on the street, make them run, then chase them for drugs and money.

And he described so-called slash days, which were paid days off that weren't on the books -- the reward for getting guns off the street.


Re: We could use a Police Abuse sticky - Part 3 - Zombie Edition
Reply #479
Hey, blue lives matter too!  *chokes on a bag of confiscated drugs*

I'm starting to think the drug dealers and gun runners are less dangerous than the actual police. (Actually, that's probably been true for a while now.)

  • meepmeep
  • Administrator
  • zombiecat queen
Re: We could use a Police Abuse sticky - Part 3 - Zombie Edition
Reply #480

Re: We could use a Police Abuse sticky - Part 3 - Zombie Edition
Reply #481
Love is like a magic penny
 if you hold it tight you won't have any
if you give it away you'll have so many
they'll be rolling all over the floor

  • dinosaurs!
  • Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital
Re: We could use a Police Abuse sticky - Part 3 - Zombie Edition
Reply #482

  • RAFH
  • Have a life, already.
Re: We could use a Police Abuse sticky - Part 3 - Zombie Edition
Reply #483
Good doggy

https://youtube.com/watch?v=KHsIwQkAJxw

Old story.

Seems the deputy is as good a shot as Bluffy.
Are we there yet?

  • uncool
Re: We could use a Police Abuse sticky - Part 3 - Zombie Edition
Reply #484
Diabetic goes to prison. Prison goes on lockdown for three weeks. During lockdown, prison serves diabetic meals consisting of "peanut butter and grape jelly, or peanut butter and syrup sandwiches, and peanut butter and jelly or peanut butter and syrup, smeared between pancakes, fifty percent of the meals".

Thread:

  • dinosaurs!
  • Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital
Re: We could use a Police Abuse sticky - Part 3 - Zombie Edition
Reply #485

  • meepmeep
  • Administrator
  • zombiecat queen
Re: We could use a Police Abuse sticky - Part 3 - Zombie Edition
Reply #486
Lots of shit coming out in testimony in that case:

http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/crime/bs-md-ci-rayam-home-invasion-20180129-story.html

Quote
In October 2015, when a drug distribution crew in Northeast Baltimore learned of a rival who they believed had drugs and cash at his apartment, they called the police.

They weren't reporting the rival to turn him in. They wanted the officers' help robbing him.

One of the dealers had grown up with Gun Trace Task Force Detective Momodu Gondo, who said his partner, Detective Jemell Rayam "had experience" with doing home invasions.

"I had considered doing a fake search warrant, that way no violence would be involved, and confiscate the money," Rayam testified. His co-conspirators "had other ideas -- that we'd just run up in there, so that's how we did it.

"The plan was to run up, and steal the money, and if they had to, kill the individuals."

http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/crime/bs-md-ci-gttf-day-four-20180130-story.html

Quote
A convicted former Baltimore police detective broke down on the witness stand Tuesday when asked about an incident in which the FBI secretly recorded members of the Gun Trace Task Force as they fled the scene of a car crash and spoke of falsifying their time sheets to make it seem that they were never there.

Re: We could use a Police Abuse sticky - Part 3 - Zombie Edition
Reply #487
We're gonna need more guillotines.

  • meepmeep
  • Administrator
  • zombiecat queen
Re: We could use a Police Abuse sticky - Part 3 - Zombie Edition
Reply #488
Oh wow, more crooked cops. In Chicago, no less!

https://www.nbcchicago.com/news/local/More-Officers-More-Former-Defendants-in-Police-Code-of-Silence-Scandal-472842963.html

Quote
A growing scandal associated with a former Chicago police tactical team accused of shaking down drug dealers and framing south side residents now includes scrutiny of at least 15 active Chicago police officers.

NBC 5 Investigates has learned the 15 officers are now assigned to desk duty, in a case which has already seen the convictions of 20 individuals overturned.

Last November, on a single day, Cook County prosecutors threw out the convictions of over a dozen men who had been arrested by Sgt. Ronald Watts and his team at the former Ida B. Wells housing project. All contended they were framed, and prosecutors did not disagree.

"In good conscience we could not let these convictions stand," Mark Rotert, the chief of the State's Attorney's Conviction Integrity Unit said that day. "In these cases we concluded, unfortunately, that police were not being truthful, and we couldn't have confidence in the integrity of their testimony."

Re: We could use a Police Abuse sticky - Part 3 - Zombie Edition
Reply #489
But the police can't be tried for perjury, obstruction of justice, or any of the other charges that any civilian would be subject to for those actions in a court, because it would erode the public trust of the justice system.

  • meepmeep
  • Administrator
  • zombiecat queen
Re: We could use a Police Abuse sticky - Part 3 - Zombie Edition
Reply #490
More updates on the Baltimore trial:

One cop said he stole money with Det. Sean Suiter, who was ~*mysteriously*~ murdered: http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/crime/bs-md-ci-gttf-gondo-day-seven-20180205-story.html

One cop worked with a dealer/bail bondsman and brought him prescription drugs that were looted in 2015 during the Freddie Gray riots: http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/crime/bs-md-ci-gttf-day-six-20180201-story.html

Unrelated story - the police union is mad that the city is not paying punitive damages in a case where cops were found to have acted with malice: http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/crime/bs-md-ci-union-lawsuits-20180207-story.html

Quote
"What this means is that police officers are now required to pay these punitive damage awards, which can amount to thousands of dollars, out of their own pockets," Ryan wrote. "Since punitive damages cannot be discharged in bankruptcy, the successful citizen can file an attachment against your wages taking 25 percent of your bi-weekly pay check until the amount of the punitive judgment is satisfied."Please keep this in mind as you go about performing your duties."

Please keep this in mind before you beat the shit out of people and violate their rights.

Quote
The $147,100 judgment in the case means taxpayers will have paid out more than $1.2 million over two years to settle three cases in which Chapman was a defendant.

Last year, the family of Tyrone West was paid $1 million by the city and state to settle a wrongful-death lawsuit alleging police misconduct and excessive force.

In 2016, a jury awarded Abdul Salaam $70,000 after he filed a civil suit against Chapman and other officers alleging that he was beaten during a July 1, 2013, traffic stop in Northeast Baltimore.

One guy has cost the city over $1 million, but the city not paying punitive damages, too, is the real problem apparently.

  • meepmeep
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  • zombiecat queen
Re: We could use a Police Abuse sticky - Part 3 - Zombie Edition
Reply #491
https://www.buzzfeed.com/albertsamaha/this-teenager-accused-two-on-duty-cops-of-rape-she-had-no

Quote
Anna assumed it was a simple case: Two cops had sex with a woman in their custody in the middle of their shift.

When a Facebook friend questioned whether there was enough evidence to dispute the officers' claim that the sex was consensual, Anna wrote back, "Listen man it doesn't fucking matter they're on duty police officers its a fucking violation these are the people we call for help not to get fucked."

But Anna didn't know that in New York, there is no law specifically stating that it is illegal for police officers or sheriff's deputies in the field to have sex with someone in their custody. It is one of 35 states where armed law enforcement officers can evade sexual assault charges by claiming that such an encounter -- from groping to intercourse -- was consensual.

In recent years, some states have closed this loophole, applying to cops the same rules already in place nationwide for probation officers and prison and jail guards. Oregon did so in 2005, Alaska in 2013, and Arizona in 2015. Most have not, partly because few people realize the loophole exists, and partly because it has been politically unpopular to push laws that target cops and anger their powerful unions.

Of at least 158 law enforcement officers charged since 2006 with sexual assault, sexual battery, or unlawful sexual contact with somebody under their control, at least 26 have been acquitted or had charges dropped based on the consent defense, according to my review of a Buffalo News database of more than 700 law enforcement officers accused of sexual misconduct.

In most of the 35 states that do not explicitly outlaw sex between on-duty cops and detainees, including New York, an officer can claim consent and face only a misdemeanor "official misconduct" charge, which carries a maximum one-year sentence.

  • RAFH
  • Have a life, already.
Re: We could use a Police Abuse sticky - Part 3 - Zombie Edition
Reply #492
https://www.buzzfeed.com/albertsamaha/this-teenager-accused-two-on-duty-cops-of-rape-she-had-no

Quote
Anna assumed it was a simple case: Two cops had sex with a woman in their custody in the middle of their shift.

When a Facebook friend questioned whether there was enough evidence to dispute the officers' claim that the sex was consensual, Anna wrote back, "Listen man it doesn't fucking matter they're on duty police officers its a fucking violation these are the people we call for help not to get fucked."

But Anna didn't know that in New York, there is no law specifically stating that it is illegal for police officers or sheriff's deputies in the field to have sex with someone in their custody. It is one of 35 states where armed law enforcement officers can evade sexual assault charges by claiming that such an encounter -- from groping to intercourse -- was consensual.

In recent years, some states have closed this loophole, applying to cops the same rules already in place nationwide for probation officers and prison and jail guards. Oregon did so in 2005, Alaska in 2013, and Arizona in 2015. Most have not, partly because few people realize the loophole exists, and partly because it has been politically unpopular to push laws that target cops and anger their powerful unions.

Of at least 158 law enforcement officers charged since 2006 with sexual assault, sexual battery, or unlawful sexual contact with somebody under their control, at least 26 have been acquitted or had charges dropped based on the consent defense, according to my review of a Buffalo News database of more than 700 law enforcement officers accused of sexual misconduct.

In most of the 35 states that do not explicitly outlaw sex between on-duty cops and detainees, including New York, an officer can claim consent and face only a misdemeanor "official misconduct" charge, which carries a maximum one-year sentence.
It should be, no excuses or explanations allowed, that any LEO can not engage in sexual conduct with a detainee. Period. Penalty is immediate dismissal with prejudice, loss of all benefits and retirement as well as a hefty fine and at least a year in prison, no parole allowed, followed by required registration as a sex offender. It's not much different than an LEO taking into custody a banker and somehow a large sum of money changes hands. That's either extortion, robbery or bribery. Of course, with the subject at hand, it's also assault.
Are we there yet?

  • uncool
Re: We could use a Police Abuse sticky - Part 3 - Zombie Edition
Reply #493

Re: We could use a Police Abuse sticky - Part 3 - Zombie Edition
Reply #494
Love is like a magic penny
 if you hold it tight you won't have any
if you give it away you'll have so many
they'll be rolling all over the floor

  • nesb
Re: We could use a Police Abuse sticky - Part 3 - Zombie Edition
Reply #495
I heard another story about an ex-military cop deciding not to shoot an armed dude who was clearly just trying to get shot. In that case, though, the guy ended up actually surviving, and the cop wasn't fired. Although, some other cops did grumble about it all. It sounds super weird to say, but I think cops might need some military training. They get to use military equipment, after all.

Re: We could use a Police Abuse sticky - Part 3 - Zombie Edition
Reply #496

  • ffejrxx
Re: We could use a Police Abuse sticky - Part 3 - Zombie Edition
Reply #497
I heard another story about an ex-military cop deciding not to shoot an armed dude who was clearly just trying to get shot. In that case, though, the guy ended up actually surviving, and the cop wasn't fired. Although, some other cops did grumble about it all. It sounds super weird to say, but I think cops might need some military training. They get to use military equipment, after all.
if not military training, atleast psych training on how to deal with unstable people

Re: We could use a Police Abuse sticky - Part 3 - Zombie Edition
Reply #498
I heard another story about an ex-military cop deciding not to shoot an armed dude who was clearly just trying to get shot. In that case, though, the guy ended up actually surviving, and the cop wasn't fired. Although, some other cops did grumble about it all. It sounds super weird to say, but I think cops might need some military training. They get to use military equipment, after all.

I think that there have been several studies that have found former military police are a hell of a lot more selective in their use of force, especially deadly force, than non-military police.

  • RAFH
  • Have a life, already.
Re: We could use a Police Abuse sticky - Part 3 - Zombie Edition
Reply #499
I heard another story about an ex-military cop deciding not to shoot an armed dude who was clearly just trying to get shot. In that case, though, the guy ended up actually surviving, and the cop wasn't fired. Although, some other cops did grumble about it all. It sounds super weird to say, but I think cops might need some military training. They get to use military equipment, after all.

I think that there have been several studies that have found former military police are a hell of a lot more selective in their use of force, especially deadly force, than non-military police.
Part of that might be their subjects are their "brothers in arms". Sort of like I suspect regular LEOs are probably a lot less trigger happy and violence prone when confronting one of their own.
Are we there yet?