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Messages - Faid

1
Perhaps someone could remind us about where the membrane and "styliform element" came from.
From nowhere, right?
:facepalm:

"Dr." Pterosaur is confused again. Can someone help "Dr." Pterosaur with this?
2
Not from the "fourth wing finger". As we've already explained.

You're welcome. If you forget again, let us know.
3
I have said  few times that I am not sure that they have interpreted Yi qi correctly. Anyone recall that? Part of my doubt is based on the "bones" they have simply drawn in.
You should totes tell Xu about your "doubts". IIRC, you have all his addresses (and have no problem posting them online).
4
Politics and Current Events / Re: Trumpocalypse
And speaking of that Phoenix event...
Quote from: Trump
This is our moment. This is our chance. This is our opportunity to recapture our dynasty like never before.

"recapture our dynasty" ? ? ?

What the actual fuck ? ? ?
After a long day at the coal-cleaning factory, every decent, hard-working American wants to come home, sit in front of the TV, break open a cold one and recapture some of the old thrills that Made America Great:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AVu01ShJ5qA
5
The LSE was drawn on the fossil picture. You can see that.


Oh, so when you said that "the 'bones' are just drawn in", you meant in the picture?

So, elements of a drawing have been drawn in! Fascinating!

Any other meaningful contributions?
6
This is a pointless line of discussion.
"Discussion"?
Quote
I am moving back to looking at Yi qi. I will shortly be away for a bit.

Aw man, and I was looking forward to our 'ANTERIOR uropatagium' discussion...
7
A few things to notice. Some of the "bones" are just drawn in. For example, most of the left styliform element (LSE).
And if that is not bad enough, the LSE and RSE are actually in pieces. It is not possible to tell if the LSE is one extended bone or separate bones. Similarly for the RSE.
Remember to call your pen pal Dr. Xu and inform him that you think he just "drew in" the bones.

His response shoud be... Interesting.
8
I looked quite thoroughly, and there just doesn't seem to be any. Which, of course, means there isn't allowed to be any! OMG conspeeracieee!

You see, as we all know, lack of evidence against a theory means that there is a conspiracy to suppress evidence against the theory. Therefore, lack of evidence against a theory is actually evidence against the theory. Fascinating!

..So yeah, penguins? Totally fish.
9
This is boring. Can we skip through the tediousness of the next steps- where "socrates" goes full YEC in his argument, deliberately obfuscates between actual, tangible evidence and theoretically conceivable, hypothetical 'evidence', claims that the "dino to bird theory" is unfalsifiable because something something Popper, we explain to him that it doesn't work that way and that "unfalsified" does not mean 'unfalsifiable", he deliberately ignores us and moves on to another aspect of this fascinating topic?

I wanna ask him about the "strikingly similar" ANTERIOR uropatagium again. Now THAT'S fascinating.
10
Oh come on "socrates", you know that's not the case. a Permian Chicken would certainly be "allowed to be considered inconsistent". Provided it's found.

Can you find one for us?
11
Awww, don't be sad, "socrates". Even if actual evidence contradicting the "dino to bird theory" doesn't exist, we can imagine some for you!

How about a Permian Chicken? Who knows, maybe we'll find one tomorrow!
12
So no evidence has been found that contradicts the dino to bird theory.
We accept your apology.

Did you figure out what "ANTERIOR" means yet?
13
It must be hard for you folks to ignore evidence staring you in the face. And then have to pretend not to see it. Go ahead. You can admit it. Just call it convergence.
How about if we call it "inability to tell left from right"? Or, in this case, "ANTERIOR from posterior"? ::)

You're a joke, "socrates". I bet you STILL haven't figured it out. :rofl:
14
"Socrates". The gift that keeps on giving.
15
I wonder- Was "socrates" confused back when he was talking about "the anterior-most digit? Perhaps he actually meant the most posterior one. that would explain why he originally thought the styliform in Yi was 'developed' from the pteroid...

16
In his scholarly career so far, "Dr" Pterosaur has:

Mistaken a foot for a hand,

Mistaken a pelvis for a shoulderblade,

Confused the fourth digit and the second one, and

Confused the terms 'anterior' and 'posterior'.

It's certainly not looking good for his tenure...
17
"ANTERIOR"

:rofl:
Does that word  sound familiar, "socrates"? Go ahead. You can admit it. ::)
19
Says the person who doesn't know what "anterior" means.

What a laugh.
20
Oh boy. Ths is gonna be another "picture a man, hands outstretched" moment, isn't it?
21
"Socrates", you're embarrassing yourself. Again.

Read your quote:
Quote
The specimen also preserves the body outline around the legs, including a skin contour anterior to the femur, analogous to skin webs in extant birds. Whereas the knee web of birds bridges the knee to the abdomen, in Ornithomimus it spans from the mid-femoral shaft to the abdomen, and is herein referred to as an anterior femoral web.
22
Apparently, "socrates" has no clue what " abdomen" means. Or "anterior".
23
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0195667115300847?via%3Dihub
Quote
A recently discovered articulated partial skeleton of Ornithomimus from the Upper Cretaceous Dinosaur Park Formation of Alberta, Canada is remarkable in the extent and quality of preservation of integumentary structures including feathers. It is the first ornithomimid to preserve a tail bearing extensive plumaceous feathers that are slightly more elongate in comparison to those present on the remainder of the body. However, the underside of the tail and the hind limb distal to the middle of the femur appear devoid of plumage. Overall, the plumage pattern in Ornithomimus is similar to that of Struthio camelus (ostrich) and other large palaeognaths, indicating a probable function in thermoregulation. The specimen also preserves the body outline around the legs, including a skin contour anterior to the femur, analogous to skin webs in extant birds. Whereas the knee web of birds bridges the knee to the abdomen, in Ornithomimus it spans from the mid-femoral shaft to the abdomen, and is herein referred to as an anterior femoral web. This is the first report of such soft tissue structures in non-avian theropods. It may indicate that the resting position of the femur was positioned more anteroventrally in ornithomimids than in most theropods, and in that sense may have been transitional to the situation in modern birds.

Even when staring at the evidence and seeing the secondarily flightless evidence they still fall back into the dino to bird theory.
Interesting:
Quote
The specimen also preserves the body outline around the legs, including a skin contour anterior to the femur, analogous to skin webs in extant birds. Whereas the knee web of birds bridges the knee to the abdomen, in Ornithomimus it spans from the mid-femoral shaft to the abdomen, and is herein referred to as an anterior femoral web.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pterosaur
Quote
Finally, at least some pterosaur groups had a membrane that stretched between the legs, possibly connecting to or incorporating the tail, called the uropatagium; the extent of this membrane is not certain, as studies on Sordes seem to suggest that it simply connected the legs but did not involve the tail (rendering it a cruropatagium). It is generally agreed though that non-pterodactyloid pterosaurs had a broader uro/cruropatagium, with pterodactyloids only having membranes running along the legs.

Notice the uropatagium.
:facepalm:
24
"People"?

Gregory S. Paul is "people".

he seems to have no problem with a dinosaur origin of birds, even though he "accepts oviraptorids as secondarily flightless".

Why do you suppose that is?

Paul argues many dinosaur groups are, including ornithomimosaurs. I think he's closer to BCF in many ways. I have no problem with that personally, as 'people' should know by now :)
I don't think he's that radical in his thinking. Doesn't BCF propose that all theropods originate from an ancient Ur-bird lineage?
25
BTW, I just noticed how Slimy Doug tries to weasel his way into an argument. Sort of like:

"You guys can't even tell me how the dino to bird theory would work with secondrily flightless oviraptorids."

"Stop lying, we've told you repeatedly"

"Oh so your theory can work with that? Good, now that you've admitted oviraptorids are secondarily flightless, let's move on"

Slimy AND pathetic.