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1
Feedlot cows are not "wild" ... yes they are tightly bunched  but they are missing the other key ingredient... Fed only fresh mature forage by keeping them on the move.

:wave:
2
I'm not going to bother to link to my previous explanation but I will explain again.  They say that repetition aids learning.

 My goats are "wild"... At least somewhat... Primarily because they are bunched into a tight group by my "predator" (movable pen) and kept on the move  so that they always get fresh mature forage and never ingest parasites.

 See how easy that was?

 You could probably commit it to memory and then you wouldn't have to ask me next time.

Oh ffs Dave! You keeping goats in a cage eating grass does not in any way make them 'wild' or even mimic 'wild'. That is not wild. Not remotely wild, not remotely like any aspect of wild goats.

Committing such a ridiculous claim to memory would make me even less likely to take anything you claim seriously, because this claim of yours is beyond silly and makes you sound like a special sort of lunatic. This is the result of your Hawkins-reading your heroes, taking a sentence out of context, and then attaching prime importance to your exaggeration of what he or she meant.

Really. Do you think feedlot cows are wild? They are certainly kept tightly bunched.
3
So let's break this down.

Dave's definition of "wild":

"Tightly bunched and on the move"

Which (supposedly) leads them to:

  • Eat fresh mature forage
  • Be free of parasites

Correct so far?
4
I'm not going to bother to link to my previous explanation but I will explain again.  They say that repetition aids learning.

 My goats are "wild"... At least somewhat... Primarily because they are bunched into a tight group by my "predator" (movable pen) and kept on the move  so that they always get fresh mature forage and never ingest parasites.

 See how easy that was?

 You could probably commit it to memory and then you wouldn't have to ask me next time.
Well, I suppose we would have to memorize that your definiton of "wild" is COMPLETELY IRRELEVANT to the actual meaning of the term.

So please stop pretending it is the same, or use it in the same context.
5
 :devil3:Yes, because wild herbivores are kept perpetually on the move, by predators constantly stalking them. And don't have parasites. For " reasons".
6
Mugabe has been removed from being an ambassador.
7
In the detailed history of England, the agriculture section explained a situation that happened way back in the past.  (I can't get to it right now because it's packed up and in a closet)

This situation arose where a lot of farmers stopped raising food crops and instead let the fields go fallow and raised livestock instead, because it was much easier, cost less, and they could make much more money.  It became so detrimental to the farming situation (or rather the powers that be) that the Government had to act, to force crops to be grown, rather than everyone raising livestock.

I read it many years ago, but it was interesting.  It seems letting animals forage, and moving them from field to field, both increased the productivity of the plant life (from the manure and letting the fields naturally recover), and was low cost, compared to plowing, planting, weeding, harvesting and spreading manure for crops.

And it was lucrative, because the animals naturally reproduced, increasing in number, and each animal provided ready income in a variety of ways.  Wool, leather, milk, meat, even horses could be rented or used for mechanical work, the entire thing was explained as a problem, from an economic point of view, since grain and vegetables and even hay started being in short supply.  I should dig it out and read it again.

The issues of profit were varied, with crops being less risky, but better in the long run, while animals were a risk and more labor intensive (no days off), but for some reason the situation was such that more and more people started raising animals rather than food crops.  There was some explaining of how beneficial animals grazing was to the soil, unlike intensive crop raising, which depleted the fields.

It's actually an interesting subject,


Nice story, but it's missing key components. 
- Prices of the different commodities
- Yields per acre for crops and for meat
- Percentage of fields fallow each year before/after

If your price differential is much more than the carrying capacity of the field then moving toward meat versus crops can be lucrative to the pocket book while non-impactful to the field.
For example, a corn crop will produce 10 tons/acre of biomass and you harvest the whole lot while removing 6 tons of material and leaving 4 tons of stalk/leaf/stover.  You remove 60% of the biomass every year.  Corn at $3/bushel yields ~$650/acre gross.
A animal eats 10% of its body weight per day but poops out 7-8%.  You end up removing only 30% of the biomass every year, and that is only if you graze the entire acre of all its biomass (not usually done) so expect less than 20% of the biomass is removed.  Also, "harvestable" meat is 50% of the removed biomass.  Meat at ~$1/lb yields ~$1,500/acre.

You could cut your herds in half, graze your property less and allow it to heal (or even lie fallow for a season) while still making money compared to corn (wheat equation is similar).
8
 I'm not going to bother to link to my previous explanation but I will explain again.  They say that repetition aids learning.

 My goats are "wild"... At least somewhat... Primarily because they are bunched into a tight group by my "predator" (movable pen) and kept on the move  so that they always get fresh mature forage and never ingest parasites.

 See how easy that was?

 You could probably commit it to memory and then you wouldn't have to ask me next time.
9
He thinks his goats are "wild" because they eat "real goat food". The fact that they are confined in a cage with no option of autonomous movement does not affect their status as "wild", apparently.

Then again, I remember that "ETHEREAL" rabbit that dave had eaten, that had supposedly cleansed his organism and had the bad germs "running for the exits". Apparently that was "real food" for dave as well, and its only difference was that dave had cooked it himself.

The placebo effect is strong in this one. So are the delusions.
10
I wonder if dave thinks of his goats as "wild".
Yup.  Do you know why?  You should by now.  It's been explained to you often enough.


Please link to your 'explanation'