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  • Talk Rational: lol, you guys can't help yourselves, can you?

Topic: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World) (Read 122921 times) previous topic - next topic

Sea Star, Alfonso Bivouac, Dave Hawkins, borealis, Saunt Taunga and 6 Guests are viewing this topic.
Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #24300
Correct me if I'm wrong, but the problem of landing on the moon had to be solved in people's heads before doing it live, did it not?
This is where you slip up Dave.  During the decades that ALL of us have discussed the Global Fludde of Noah, no one but YOU seems to have "solved" the problems of the flood.
We've given these problems time and effort to investigate and do NOT find the flood history in any type of historic record.
Where in the name of God did you come up with the idea that I have solved all the problems with the global flood?

I haven't.  And why are you talking about the global flood on this thread?

What I've solved "in my head" is my air infiltration problem in my house.

Which, I agree, is not as earth shaking as putting a man on the moon.

Although it's probably more useful.

  • Faid
Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #24301
Which, I agree, is not as earth shaking as putting a man on the moon.

Although it's probably more useful.
It's a good thing moon landings were fake then.

Oh I'm sorry, do you draw the line at that conspiracy theory?
Who even made the rule that we cannot group ducks and fish together for the simple reason that they are both aquatic? If I want to group them that way and it serves my purpose then I can jolly well do it however I want to and it is still a nested hierarchy and you can't tell me that it's not.

  • VoxRat
  • wtactualf
Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #24302
Where in the name of God did you come up with the idea that I have solved all the problems with the global flood?
You don't seem to think there's any evidence that contradicts it.

Ergo:  either you have solved all the problems that are raised (like multiple chronometry methods agreeing with one another but contradicting any Global Flood), or you are lying to yourself and everyone else when you say there is Overwhelming Evidence that it happened (i.e. your "Elephant in the Room" bluster/bravado).

"I understand Donald Trump better than many people because I really am a lot like him." - Dave Hawkins

  • borealis
  • Administrator
Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #24303
Air infiltration.

Focus.

Well, you just yell at people when they offer advice or observations on air infiltration, so an interesting diversion's in order, wouldn't you say?

I'll offer my thoughts on the matter and see if I get a 'manipulative bitch' or 'good dog'.

If you must use Tyvek for your interior walls, note that it glues up fine with a variety of organic glues, such as casein and even rabbit skin glue. Also it's very paintable with water based paints such as acrylics and latex. However, a layer of paint increases the weight of the material enormously, about 10 pounds per gallon of interior paint. You could in fact paint it and hang it like curtains.


  • Pingu
Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #24304
Where in the name of God did you come up with the idea that I have solved all the problems with the global flood?
You don't seem to think there's any evidence that contradicts it.

Ergo:  either you have solved all the problems that are raised (like multiple chronometry methods agreeing with one another but contradicting any Global Flood), or you are lying to yourself and everyone else when you say there is Overwhelming Evidence that it happened (i.e. your "Elephant in the Room" bluster/bravado).

He thinks that it is enough to show that the mainstream model is "fatally flawed".  But he refuses to come up with anything other than billionsofdeadthings and lotsafloodlegends, both of which are actually BETTER accounted for under the mainstream model.

While anything that shows that YEC is fatally flawed has to be "cherry picked data".  Which he also dare not look at.

It really is kind of sad.
I have a Darwin-debased mind.

  • JonF
Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #24305
Correct me if I'm wrong, but the problem of landing on the moon had to be solved in people's heads AND DOING THE FUCKING WORK REQUIRED before doing it live, did it not?
FIFY

Your track record of solving things in your head or anywhere else sucks.
"I would never consider my evaluation of his work to be fair minded unless I had actually read his own words." - Dave Hawkins

Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #24306
Air infiltration.

Focus.

Well, you just yell at people when they offer advice or observations on air infiltration, so an interesting diversion's in order, wouldn't you say?

I'll offer my thoughts on the matter and see if I get a 'manipulative bitch' or 'good dog'.

If you must use Tyvek for your interior walls, note that it glues up fine with a variety of organic glues, such as casein and even rabbit skin glue. Also it's very paintable with water based paints such as acrylics and latex. However, a layer of paint increases the weight of the material enormously, about 10 pounds per gallon of interior paint. You could in fact paint it and hang it like curtains.
Good dog!

Lol

  • Faid
Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #24307
Of course, Brilliant dave already knew all that. He had it all 'in his head' so to speak. Advice from other, non-Brilliant people simply helps in manifesting those dormant ideas in dave's head, essentially informing him of the things he already knew.
Who even made the rule that we cannot group ducks and fish together for the simple reason that they are both aquatic? If I want to group them that way and it serves my purpose then I can jolly well do it however I want to and it is still a nested hierarchy and you can't tell me that it's not.

  • borealis
  • Administrator
Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #24308
Well yeah.

Nevertheless, Tyvek, for a weird accidentally discovered plastic fabric, can be an interesting material to work with creatively. You can paint it, sew it, glue it, cut it, can't easily tear it. If Dave really wants a transportable home, and doesn't want to have four million large staples in his strawbale interior walls, hanging Tyvek curtains all around would save him a lot of work. And if he wanted to get creative, he could paint them.

Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #24309
Something similar I'm going to experiment with if I can find the time ... clear plastic gazebo curtains with a sealed plastic top ... sort of a portable glass house for the Aged P's to sit in when it's cold but sunny.

Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #24310
And back on the topic of heat generation ... summer cooling was easy because my cooling load matched my available power - solar.

But in winter, my heating load (in my particular situation) is greatest at two times ... right before bed ... and right before getting up in the morning. In the middle of the night and when I'm gone, not much heat is needed.

But my available solar power doesn't occur at those times ... and if I'm going to run the wood stove, the best time is to fire it up about 5pm and run it until bedtime.

So ...

  • Pingu
Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #24311
Something similar I'm going to experiment with if I can find the time ... clear plastic gazebo curtains with a sealed plastic top ... sort of a portable glass house for the Aged P's to sit in when it's cold but sunny.
And when you also need to port them, I guess.
I have a Darwin-debased mind.

Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #24312
I'm going to use my solar array to heat water during the day ... and use my wood stove to heat water (and me) in the evening ... then run my hydronic heater early morning using the stored water heat.

  • borealis
  • Administrator
Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #24313
And back on the topic of heat generation ... summer cooling was easy because my cooling load matched my available power - solar.

But in winter, my heating load (in my particular situation) is greatest at two times ... right before bed ... and right before getting up in the morning. In the middle of the night and when I'm gone, not much heat is needed.

But my available solar power doesn't occur at those times ... and if I'm going to run the wood stove, the best time is to fire it up about 5pm and run it until bedtime.

So ...

Are you actually putting your fire out when you go to bed?

If you're heating with wood in winter, you don't need to let the fire go out at all. Make a roaring hot fire in the morning. Just before you leave, chuck some firewood in there and turn the draft down. Come home from work. Open the draft wide open, add firewood. Run a hot fire until bedtime. Rinse and repeat. Result. Warm house, cools down but doesn't freeze while you work or sleep, lots of hot coals left, fire takes off in seconds when you add wood and open draft. And no creosote build-up.

How much wood to add depends on your stove, its size, your firewood. Don't let your fire smoulder. It should never ever smoulder. If you look into your firebox and smoke is coming off your fuel, you need more air in there or drier wood.

Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #24314
Ok I'll try that ...

Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #24315
Ok ... wood stove questions ... "don't let it smoulder" ... but if you turn the draft down, how does it NOT smoulder?  My woodstove is one of those glass front types and the draft is controlled by a handle that you pull in and out ... I never seem to get much air this way, so a lot of the time, I just crack the door open a bit.  I obviously have A LOT to learn about wood stoves.  I do have a good friend close by who heats his house with nothing but wood and he would give me some hands on training.  Note to self.

Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #24316
"drier wood"

Yeah I'm not too good about this ... I need to do a better job keeping it dry.  What about wood species?  Hedge is my favorite but I don't have much.  I have a lot of hackberry and oak and elm.

  • Pingu
Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #24317
"drier wood"

Yeah I'm not too good about this ... I need to do a better job keeping it dry.  What about wood species?  Hedge is my favorite but I don't have much.  I have a lot of hackberry and oak and elm.

Dry is the important thing.  The next most important thing is sustainability - what have you got, and how much can you coppice of each species sustainably?
I have a Darwin-debased mind.

Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #24318
According to this, I should be able to get about 2 cords per year from my 2 acres just from dead and fallen timber ... https://www.motherearthnews.com/homesteading-and-livestock/woodlot-firewood-management-zmaz70mazkin

But that topic has more to do with making the house tight / energy efficient.

My focus at the moment is learning how to manage the actual stove better.

  • MikeS
Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #24319
According to this, I should be able to get about 2 cords per year from my 2 acres just from dead and fallen timber ... https://www.motherearthnews.com/homesteading-and-livestock/woodlot-firewood-management-zmaz70mazkin

But that topic has more to do with making the house tight / energy efficient.

My focus at the moment is learning how to manage the actual stove better.
It may not seem obvious, but having all your air coming from below or from one area is not always the best, especially with wet or non-seasoned wood.  If you see vapor or smoke pouring off your logs then you need more air, but sometimes the best addition is just above this vapor/smoke since this is a sign of incomplete combustion.  If you add air above or right at these smoking points then flame will "advance" into the smoke area of the log and finish combustion.

Dry or seasoned wood doesn't have this issue as much since the water content is low and combustion continues whether in excess oxygen or even starved of oxygen.  This answers your OTHER question, if an area of seasoned wood is starved of oxygen then you are basically making Coke from your wood.  That's why when you open up the flue and get air moving again, any residual embers will light up the coke in the pile quickly.

  • borealis
  • Administrator
Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #24320
Ok ... wood stove questions ... "don't let it smoulder" ... but if you turn the draft down, how does it NOT smoulder?  My woodstove is one of those glass front types and the draft is controlled by a handle that you pull in and out ... I never seem to get much air this way, so a lot of the time, I just crack the door open a bit.  I obviously have A LOT to learn about wood stoves.  I do have a good friend close by who heats his house with nothing but wood and he would give me some hands on training.  Note to self.

Having your friend come over and spend a couple hours with you and your stove is a good idea.

If you have had a hot fire going for a while - your firewood is burning well with strong flames and no smoke to speak of - then when you close/turn down the draft it should continue to combust, just not as fast and with less evident flame. If it's smouldering it isn't combusting well.

Another issue is your chimney. I assume you have a standard double wall steel chimney. It has to stick up above the highest peak of your house and needs to be the right size for your stove.

Besides your stove draft letting air into the firebox, your chimney needs to be drawing air upwards. If your fire is hard to light, or smoke comes into the room when you open the stove door, your chimney isn't drawing well. Your chimney is a tall column of cold air. When you first light your fire, you need to get that column of air warm enough to rise. Sometimes, if necessary, you can speed that up by burning a bunch of paper right under the flue outlet inside the firebox.

Wouldn't hurt to read this:

http://woodheat.org/all-about-chimneys.html

Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #24321
 Yes I should probably redo my chimney to have a taller vertical run

  • MikeS
Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #24322
You can also draw air from the outer shroud of the chimney, this air is preheated by the stack.  Put a vent angled down above your roof line to get fresh air and then run a fan inside for preheated air.  You can use this air for combustion (making your flame hotter and your fireplace more efficient) or for just home heating.

  • Photon
  • I interfere with myself
Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #24323
Put your chimney oriented to exhaust under your covers.  Warm air and footsies all night!

Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #24324
Dave,

connect a pipe from your car exhaust into the slanty shanty.  Leave it running for about an hour and you'll be toasty warm with lovely red cheeks.