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Topic: Space bacteria. (Read 126 times) previous topic - next topic

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Space bacteria.
Not sure yet if they've found a new form of extremeophile, or something we've known about for a while.

Bacteria found on outside of ISS.

Some of it has been there at least 3 years...surviving...in space.  :ohmy:

Re: Space bacteria.
Reply #1
Quote
They are being studied on Earth but most likely they don't pose any sort of danger

CUT TO:


Re: Space bacteria.
Reply #2
Quote
"And now it turns out that somehow these swabs reveal bacteria that were absent during the launch of the ISS module. That is, they have come from outer space and settled along the external surface. They are being studied so far and it seems that they pose no danger," the Russian astronaut said.

Some terrestrial bacteria also survived on the space station's external surface, though they had remained within a space vacuum for three years. In addition to that, they underwent sharp swings in temperature from minus 150 to plus 150 degrees Celsius, he noted.

The bacteria were brought to the space station accidentally on tablet PCs together with various materials that are placed aboard the ISS for long periods to study the materials' behavior in outer space.
wait, what?
Love is like a magic penny
 if you hold it tight you won't have any
if you give it away you'll have so many
they'll be rolling all over the floor

Re: Space bacteria.
Reply #3
yeah, I think the wording there might be a bit off (it is from a russian science news site). I'm going to go looking for some related articles later if I get the chance.

Re: Space bacteria.
Reply #4
apparently the Russian cosmonauts say it's not from Earth:
Quote
A Russian cosmonaut claims to have caught aliens. Cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov says he found bacteria clinging to the external surface of the International Space Station that didn't come from the surface of Earth.

Shkaplerov told the Russian news agency Tass that cosmonauts collected the bacteria by swabbing the outside of the space station during space walks years ago. 

"And now it turns out that somehow these swabs reveal bacteria that were absent during the launch of the ISS module," Shkaplerov told Tass. "That is, they have come from outer space and settled along the external surface. They are being studied so far and it seems that they pose no danger."

The cosmonaut is preparing for his third trip to the space station next month. The collection of life forms from the outside of the ISS during one of his previous trips was something of a mini controversy a few years back. Russian scientists reported that spacewalk sample harvests yielded evidence of apparent sea plankton clinging to the station. The claims caught NASA by surprise at the time, which said it had heard nothing from the Russians about any space plankton.
https://www.cnet.com/news/alien-life-international-space-station-bacteria-nasa-space-walk/

Which has to be wrong because they are in Earth orbit and also because no one is freaking the fuck out.
Love is like a magic penny
 if you hold it tight you won't have any
if you give it away you'll have so many
they'll be rolling all over the floor

Re: Space bacteria.
Reply #5
http://bgr.com/2017/11/28/alien-bacteria-russia-international-space-station-extraterrestrial-life/
http://www.newsweek.com/russian-astronaut-says-alien-life-found-space-station-did-not-come-earth-724445
Quote
Based solely on Shkaplerov's comments, it's too early to say we have found extraterrestrial life: The station has been in orbit for almost two decades and there are plenty of ways microbes could have sneaked up since the launch. NASA did not respond to a request for comment about the statement, but in 2014, when Russian officials announced that a similar project had found Earthen bacteria on the space station's exterior, NASA was quick to point out they had received no such information.

Even the best sterilization techniques can't necessarily remove all traces of life on Earth when an uncrewed mission launches. That's why, for example, NASA was careful to destroy the Cassini spacecraft by sending it plummeting into Saturn rather than risk it touching the planet's potentially habitable moon Enceladus. It's also why when NASA selects target landing and exploration sites for its Mars missions, it rules out places it thinks bacteria could flourish.



But sterilization gets even trickier at the International Space Station, which has been in orbit since 1998. The space agencies that participate in the project do what they can to decontaminate supplies and quarantine astronauts, but like any other building that serves as a home for humans, its interior is known to be brimming with bacteria, which NASA monitors. Bacteria are also known to hang out in the upper reaches of Earth's atmosphere, as high as 20 miles above the surface.

Shkaplerov, who has spent a year in orbit, will be returning to the International Space Station via a rocket launch scheduled to take place next month.
they are indeed saying it's ET.
Love is like a magic penny
 if you hold it tight you won't have any
if you give it away you'll have so many
they'll be rolling all over the floor

Re: Space bacteria.
Reply #6
Should be pretty trivial to demonstrate that.
Do they have DNA? Is it left or right handed?
Do they have proteins? Are the amino acids left or right handed?
Do they have something like a close variant of the universal genetic code?
Do they have a variant of the translation-system found in all Earth-based cellular life?

Show us the genetic and protein sequences. Show us electron micrographs of the cells and their internal structures.

Call me skeptical, but I'm not buying it.
  • Last Edit: November 30, 2017, 05:57:21 AM by Rumraket
"At least you can fucking die and leave North Korea." - Christopher Hitchens

  • Faid
Re: Space bacteria.
Reply #7
Well they are supra- terrestrial, technically, But I don't believe they actually think they are aliens. Maybe they picked up some from the stratosphere.
Who even made the rule that we cannot group ducks and fish together for the simple reason that they are both aquatic? If I want to group them that way and it serves my purpose then I can jolly well do it however I want to and it is still a nested hierarchy and you can't tell me that it's not.

  • Doobie Keebler
  • Ridiculous Callipygous
Re: Space bacteria.
Reply #8
I remember when this was first reported. I wasn't entirely surprised then because of the way the shuttles were launched. The mobile platforms use a sound suppression system that consists of a large water tower that's piped to six short towers on the platform to subdue the pressure of reflected sound.

About 300,000 gallons of water are dumped onto the mobile platform and into the exhaust trenches that are built into it. Most of this turns into steam, which most people mistake for exhaust smoke, but a good portion is also turned into mist which initially swirls around the platform and while the vast majority is blown clear some of it winds up on the orbiter. While the water is probably treated it's reasonable to suspect that there may be bacteria and other microorganisms present in the non-potable water supply.

The superstructure at each of the three launch pads is exposed at all times to rain, wind blown organics, tons of bird shit and organics from nesting, and also bathed with the mist and steam from the sound suppression system at each launch. In the environment of coastal Florida they might as well be incubators. Cabling, piping, and walkways from the super structure routinely come into contact with or close proximity to the flight assembly pre-launch.

Another possible but less likely source might be transference from the solid booster rockets. The boosters are parachuted into the ocean to be retrieved and refurbished for reuse. While they are no doubt well cleaned in some manner to remove the salt and whatnot from seawater to prevent corrosion they probably weren't exactly 100% sterilized. Some of the motor casings were reused up to 48 times. Still, the path to orbiter contamination here is probably unlikely.

That's not including the relatively open environment of the assembly building. It's not exactly a clean room.

And that's just the crap we sent up.



"I'm over 70 and have never seen such , arrogance, incompetence and Ill -intentions as this President and his aids."    The Dotard     (posted 12 days after his 68th birthday)