Skip to main content

TR Memescape

  • TalkRational: We accept Gelato guy's apology

Topic: Virus fished from pond cures man’s deadly antibiotic-resistant infection (Read 344 times) previous topic - next topic

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
  • nesb
Virus fished from pond cures man’s deadly antibiotic-resistant infection
https://arstechnica.com/science/2018/03/attack-of-the-pond-virus-it-outwits-drug-resistant-bacteria-saved-mans-life/

Quote
But in Westernized countries, phage therapy has largely been passed over by researchers, given the success of antibiotics. As such, phages have failed to garner the needed research attention to establish their safety and efficacy. That's changing now, albeit slowly, with the rise of antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

But this pond phage isn't your garden-variety microbial marauder. The phage--dubbed OMKO1--has the unique ability to force surviving drug-resistant bacteria into ditching their drug resistance. This is critical. One of the main arguments against turning to phage therapy is that bacteria can readily evolve resistance to them. Researchers have plenty of evidence of this. Thus, some researchers fear that any effective phage therapy is destined to the same impotent fate as many of our once powerful antibiotics.

But, if phages can kill bacteria and make survivors evolve to be vulnerable to drugs, then a one-two punch of phage and drugs could knock out any infection, resistant or not. In other words, "phage such as OMKO1 that appear to force a clinically relevant trade-off may present an effective solution to the inevitable evolution of resistance by pathogenic bacteria," the Yale researchers conclude.

You never know. This could be something.

  • VoxRat
  • wtactualf
Re: Virus fished from pond cures man’s deadly antibiotic-resistant infection
Reply #1
The other problem with phage therapy, of course, is not only will bacteria become resistant, but humans will too (unlike with antibiotics).
I.e., the patient will develop antibodies against the phage, so it's good for a one-off, but you probably can't keep going back to it, like we do with penicillin.

Still...
Cool!
"I understand Donald Trump better than many people because I really am a lot like him." - Dave Hawkins

  • uncool
Re: Virus fished from pond cures man’s deadly antibiotic-resistant infection
Reply #2
The other problem with phage therapy, of course, is not only will bacteria become resistant, but humans will too (unlike with antibiotics).
I.e., the patient will develop antibodies against the phage, so it's good for a one-off, but you probably can't keep going back to it, like we do with penicillin.

Still...
Cool!
Is there any general process for a human to "accept" a virus as beneficial, similar to how gut bacteria work? Or is that something particular in some way to bacteria?

  • Peez
Re: Virus fished from pond cures man’s deadly antibiotic-resistant infection
Reply #3
The other problem with phage therapy, of course, is not only will bacteria become resistant, but humans will too (unlike with antibiotics).
I.e., the patient will develop antibodies against the phage, so it's good for a one-off, but you probably can't keep going back to it, like we do with penicillin.

Still...
Cool!
Is there any general process for a human to "accept" a virus as beneficial, similar to how gut bacteria work? Or is that something particular in some way to bacteria?
In general gut bacteria are protected from many of the body's immune responses just because they are in the gut.  This is because the contents of your gut are 'outside' your body in a very real sense.  One might try to design a virus that evades your immune system, but there are some challenges to that and some obvious risks should you be successful.

Peez

  • meepmeep
  • Administrator
  • zombiecat queen
Re: Virus fished from pond cures man’s deadly antibiotic-resistant infection
Reply #4
We've had some success with a few adenovirus vectors that don't seem to be terribly immunogenic. I don't know a lot about phage technology, but modified phages have been used in vaccine research with some success in animals.

  • Monad
Re: Virus fished from pond cures man’s deadly antibiotic-resistant infection
Reply #5
The other problem with phage therapy, of course, is not only will bacteria become resistant, but humans will too (unlike with antibiotics).
I.e., the patient will develop antibodies against the phage, so it's good for a one-off, but you probably can't keep going back to it, like we do with penicillin.

Still...
Cool!
Is there any general process for a human to "accept" a virus as beneficial, similar to how gut bacteria work? Or is that something particular in some way to bacteria?
In general gut bacteria are protected from many of the body's immune responses just because they are in the gut.  This is because the contents of your gut are 'outside' your body in a very real sense.  One might try to design a virus that evades your immune system, but there are some challenges to that and some obvious risks should you be successful.

Peez


The gut is already full of phages, it's just they can't get to other parts of the body without running the gauntlet of the immune system

https://gutpathogens.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13099-017-0196-7

https://www.nature.com/articles/nrmicro.2017.30

Found some fascinating papers on symbiotic interactions between gut bacteria, viruses, archaea, fungi and hosts:

http://www.mdpi.com/journal/viruses/special_issues/VBIG

https://www.evernote.com/Home.action?login=true#n=c8ee0b1a-d91c-4c90-bbfd-54b456e60df5&s=s9&ses=1&sh=5&sds=5&x=virus&