Skip to main content

TR Memescape

  • TalkRational: We let almost anyone in

Topic: Status of disease eradication programs (Read 592 times) previous topic - next topic

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
  • uncool
Status of disease eradication programs
Polio eradication:
22 wild cases, 96 vaccine-derived cases in 2017, down from an estimated 400,000 in 1980. Only four countries currently have cases: Afghanistan, Pakistan, Syria, and the DRC.

Dracunculiasis eradication:
30 cases in 2017, down from nearly a million in 1989. Only two countries currently have cases: Ethiopia and Chad.

We're surprisingly close to getting rid of two major infectious diseases.

  • meepmeep
  • Administrator
  • zombiecat queen
Re: Status of disease eradication programs
Reply #1
Cool, this will make up for all of the emerging diseases right around the corner and all of the disease surprises climate change has in store for us. :v:

Re: Status of disease eradication programs
Reply #2
I had a fairly stark reminder of how far we've come in combating polio- I was working in the Iron Lung collection a couple of days ago. We have this, "Smith-Clarke 'Baby' cabinet respirator". That's an iron lung for infants. Hospitals used to have dozens of them. People nowadays have no clue about this sort of thing.
Why do I bother?

  • MSG
Re: Status of disease eradication programs
Reply #3
Back in the 70s a guy used to visit our farm whose father was in an iron lung
braying among the ruins

  • SR-71
  • Schmewbie
Re: Status of disease eradication programs
Reply #4
I guess we could shoehorn this in here.  Therapy, cure, or something, for reversing arteriosclerosis.  Works in mice, may work in people.

http://www.wbur.org/hereandnow/2018/03/22/vascular-aging-mice-study

Quote
On the potential for the study's results to translate to humans

"I'm quite optimistic with this one, because our blood vessels work the same way as in mice. This isn't a complicated disease like Alzheimer's. And so I think that actually I'd be surprised if there isn't some benefit in people. Of course the challenge is to make a drug, and we have to make sure it's super safe, but we're already doing human studies over the road from my lab at Harvard. And so far it looks really good."

Go forth and eat you a Twinkie, people.

  • SkepticTank
  • Global Moderator
  • Calmer than you are
Re: Status of disease eradication programs
Reply #5
When are we gonna start using CRISPR to fix genetic diseases like... oh, I don't know.... Tuberous Sclerosis?

I heard on NPR today that there are only 10 human studies currently underway, and 9 of them are in China.

Re: Status of disease eradication programs
Reply #6
When are we gonna start using CRISPR to fix genetic diseases like... oh, I don't know.... Tuberous Sclerosis?

I heard on NPR today that there are only 10 human studies currently underway, and 9 of them are in China.

Yes it seems the Chinese have no difficulty finding subjects for their human studies.
"When a true genius appears in this world, you may know him by this sign, that the dunces are all in confederacy against him." (Jonathan Swift)

  • Monad
Re: Status of disease eradication programs
Reply #7
96 vaccine derived cases?

  • uncool
Re: Status of disease eradication programs
Reply #8
96 vaccine derived cases?
Some of the vaccines used an attenuated but live virus, both because it makes administering the vaccine easier and because in some cases it can be more potent. There is a standard process - use the live vaccine when there are too many cases to handle otherwise, step down to the inactivated version (i.e. one where the virus has been killed) when the spread is under control, and eventually stop giving the vaccine after its eradication has been confirmed.
  • Last Edit: March 25, 2018, 02:07:48 PM by uncool

  • Monad
Re: Status of disease eradication programs
Reply #9
I know about attenuated vaccines, that just seems to be rather a lot of cases (over 4x the wild version). Surely they should not be as severe?

  • uncool
Re: Status of disease eradication programs
Reply #10
I know about attenuated vaccines, that just seems to be rather a lot of cases (over 4x the wild version). Surely they should not be as severe?
Looks like that was usually the case; there seems to have been a major outbreak in Syria (74 of the cases, all vaccine-derived).

  • meepmeep
  • Administrator
  • zombiecat queen
Re: Status of disease eradication programs
Reply #11
The other cases were all in DRC.

What happens is the attenuated virus can still replicate in the intestine and is still shed in feces. It just can't penetrate the nervous system and cause the typical neurological signs. If you have a successful eradication program that's working well and have a certain level of community level protection, this sort of thing is unlikely to happen. But if a few vaccinated people are shedding the attenuated virus and if a lot of unvaccinated, unprotected people are coming into contact with it, there's a chance the virus could reacquire virulence and gain the ability to cause neurological signs again.

  • uncool
Re: Status of disease eradication programs
Reply #12
Fuck fuck fuckity fucking fuck.



How? I mean, under-vaccinated, yes, but how did they even get exposed?

  • meepmeep
  • Administrator
  • zombiecat queen
Re: Status of disease eradication programs
Reply #13
Can't find any good specific information, but it's within the realm of possibility that the scenario I mentioned in my last post played out - attenuated virus being shed and then reacquiring virulence in an unprotected high risk child. Contact from a traveler doesn't seem as likely given the description of where the child lives.

  • borealis
  • Administrator
Re: Status of disease eradication programs
Reply #14
Awful news. I really hope it doesn't spread.

Knew a sculptor in the Netherlands (early 70s, he was in his mid forties) who'd had polio in childhood and recovered to a great extent, but had that wasted muscles look and a bad limp,

  • el jefe
  • asleep till 2020 or 2024
Re: Status of disease eradication programs
Reply #15
love all the progress.  the advances in antivirals and cancer immunotherapy blow my mind.

but I don't care because this country is going straight to hell.  I hear the number of American flags is at an all time low.  *watches fox news showing a chart of the declining number of american flags*  *shakes head bitterly*

  • F X
  • The one and only
Re: Status of disease eradication programs
Reply #16
Fuck fuck fuckity fucking fuck.



How? I mean, under-vaccinated, yes, but how did they even get exposed?

Quote
The attenuated poliovirus(es) contained in OPV are able to replicate effectively in the intestine, but around 10,000 times less able to enter the central nervous system than the wild virus.

http://polioeradication.org/polio-today/polio-prevention/the-vaccines/opv/


"If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and man."
― Mark Twain 🔭

  • meepmeep
  • Administrator
  • zombiecat queen
Re: Status of disease eradication programs
Reply #17
good job reading the thread genius

  • uncool
Re: Status of disease eradication programs
Reply #18
Can't find any good specific information, but it's within the realm of possibility that the scenario I mentioned in my last post played out - attenuated virus being shed and then reacquiring virulence in an unprotected high risk child. Contact from a traveler doesn't seem as likely given the description of where the child lives.
My main thought was that given that the last case in the Americas was almost 30 years ago, the vaccine was no longer being given (excluding cases of travel/etc.) specifically to reduce risks like this.

  • VoxRat
  • wtactualf
Re: Status of disease eradication programs
Reply #19
Can't find any good specific information, but it's within the realm of possibility that the scenario I mentioned in my last post played out - attenuated virus being shed and then reacquiring virulence in an unprotected high risk child. Contact from a traveler doesn't seem as likely given the description of where the child lives.
My main thought was that given that the last case in the Americas was almost 30 years ago, the vaccine was no longer being given (excluding cases of travel/etc.) specifically to reduce risks like this.
That's exactly why we switched back to the killed vaccine in the U.S.
"I understand Donald Trump better than many people because I really am a lot like him." - Dave Hawkins

  • meepmeep
  • Administrator
  • zombiecat queen
Re: Status of disease eradication programs
Reply #20
Can't find any good specific information, but it's within the realm of possibility that the scenario I mentioned in my last post played out - attenuated virus being shed and then reacquiring virulence in an unprotected high risk child. Contact from a traveler doesn't seem as likely given the description of where the child lives.
My main thought was that given that the last case in the Americas was almost 30 years ago, the vaccine was no longer being given (excluding cases of travel/etc.) specifically to reduce risks like this.

The inactivated polio vaccine is still recommended and routine here.

Looks like in Venezuela, the recommendation is to give one dose of inactivated (VPI in the chart) followed by two doses of the oral vaccine: http://www.svpediatria.org/secciones/publicaciones/esquema-de-inmunizacion/

So the oral vaccine is still around in some capacity.

  • F X
  • The one and only
Re: Status of disease eradication programs
Reply #21
I have the 1960 medical reference that explains in great detail the treatment to be used for children who got polio from taking the polio vaccine. As well as treating unvaccinated patients who got polio from the children shedding the live polio virus after taking the live vaccine.  It's not an unheard of problem.
"If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and man."
― Mark Twain 🔭

  • F X
  • The one and only
Re: Status of disease eradication programs
Reply #22
So the oral vaccine is still around in some capacity.
So is circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus (cVDPV)

http://www.who.int/features/qa/64/en/
"If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and man."
― Mark Twain 🔭

  • F X
  • The one and only
Re: Status of disease eradication programs
Reply #23
"There is no patent. Could you patent the sun?"
"If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and man."
― Mark Twain 🔭

  • meepmeep
  • Administrator
  • zombiecat queen
Re: Status of disease eradication programs
Reply #24
shitposting virus outbreak detected, don your PPE everyone