Skip to main content

TR Memescape

  • Talk Rational: Wading helps.

Topic: A New Genetic Clue to How Humans Got Such Big Brains (Read 302 times) previous topic - next topic

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
  • Pingu
A New Genetic Clue to How Humans Got Such Big Brains
Nice article about a fascinating story:

A New Genetic Clue to How Humans Got Such Big Brains


I have a Darwin-debased mind.

Re: A New Genetic Clue to How Humans Got Such Big Brains
Reply #1
Love ed yong.  He does science writing well.
Love is like a magic penny
 if you hold it tight you won't have any
if you give it away you'll have so many
they'll be rolling all over the floor

  • Pingu
Re: A New Genetic Clue to How Humans Got Such Big Brains
Reply #2
Yes, it's science writing at its best I think.  I like the way he weaves the two separate stories.

And it really is interesting, from all kinds of points of view, not least the genetics of mental health disorders.
I have a Darwin-debased mind.

  • el jefe
  • asleep till 2020 or 2024
Re: A New Genetic Clue to How Humans Got Such Big Brains
Reply #3
have they identified the gene that makes people believe in creationism?

  • Pingu
Re: A New Genetic Clue to How Humans Got Such Big Brains
Reply #4
Well one interesting thing is that the original gene got duplicated, and so was free to mutate, especially as it was only partly duplicated in the first place and so the original duplicate was non-functional anyway.  But because of its similarity to the original, it was able to be mutated back into functionality by being "overwritten" at some stage by the original.

Which is a nice counter-illustration to the idea that once a sequence has become "junk" it can't be unjunked again by "chance". Clearly there are mechanisms by which a later mutation can actually restore some of the original sequence.

At least that's my read of the article.  Perhaps a genetics person can weigh in.
I have a Darwin-debased mind.

  • VoxRat
  • wtactualf
Re: A New Genetic Clue to How Humans Got Such Big Brains
Reply #5
Yes, that's sounds right to me.
"I understand Donald Trump better than many people because I really am a lot like him." - Dave Hawkins

Re: A New Genetic Clue to How Humans Got Such Big Brains
Reply #6
Nice article about a fascinating story

Another just-so story. More of the same evo-devo mumbo jumbo. The full article can be read here:  https://www.cell.com/cell/fulltext/S0092-8674(18)30383-0

I am not convinced that the NOTCH2NL add-on really is missing in the great apes. The authors did a very brief search:

Quote
Unlike human, both chimpanzee and gorilla have variable read depth over the region encompassing their NOTCH2NL-like sequences. This pattern suggests the existence of multiple versions of truncated NOTCH2NL-like genes in these species (Figure 2A). Consistent with this, we identified several different transcribed NOTCH2NL-like genes in chimpanzee. However, sequencing revealed that none of these genes encode NOTCH2-related proteins (Figures 2B and S2).
  • Last Edit: June 04, 2018, 11:39:31 AM by Atheistoclast

Re: A New Genetic Clue to How Humans Got Such Big Brains
Reply #7
Nice article about a fascinating story

Another just-so story. More of the same evo-devo mumbo jumbo. The full article can be read here:  https://www.cell.com/cell/fulltext/S0092-8674(18)30383-0

I am not convinced that the NOTCH2NL add-on really is missing in the great apes. The authors did a very brief search:

Quote
Unlike human, both chimpanzee and gorilla have variable read depth over the region encompassing their NOTCH2NL-like sequences. This pattern suggests the existence of multiple versions of truncated NOTCH2NL-like genes in these species (Figure 2A). Consistent with this, we identified several different transcribed NOTCH2NL-like genes in chimpanzee. However, sequencing revealed that none of these genes encode NOTCH2-related proteins (Figures 2B and S2).

I would recommended rejection if I were the assigned reviewer.

  • RAFH
  • Have a life, already.
Re: A New Genetic Clue to How Humans Got Such Big Brains
Reply #8
Nice article about a fascinating story

Another just-so story. More of the same evo-devo mumbo jumbo. The full article can be read here:  https://www.cell.com/cell/fulltext/S0092-8674(18)30383-0

I am not convinced that the NOTCH2NL add-on really is missing in the great apes. The authors did a very brief search:

Quote
Unlike human, both chimpanzee and gorilla have variable read depth over the region encompassing their NOTCH2NL-like sequences. This pattern suggests the existence of multiple versions of truncated NOTCH2NL-like genes in these species (Figure 2A). Consistent with this, we identified several different transcribed NOTCH2NL-like genes in chimpanzee. However, sequencing revealed that none of these genes encode NOTCH2-related proteins (Figures 2B and S2).
And, of course, the world of science waits upon your conviction with bated breath.
Are we there yet?

Re: A New Genetic Clue to How Humans Got Such Big Brains
Reply #9
Well one interesting thing is that the original gene got duplicated, and so was free to mutate, especially as it was only partly duplicated in the first place and so the original duplicate was non-functional anyway.  But because of its similarity to the original, it was able to be mutated back into functionality by being "overwritten" at some stage by the original.

Which is a nice counter-illustration to the idea that once a sequence has become "junk" it can't be unjunked again by "chance". Clearly there are mechanisms by which a later mutation can actually restore some of the original sequence.

At least that's my read of the article.  Perhaps a genetics person can weigh in.


That shows your complete miscomprehension of this paper and the field of genetics in general.

  • Faid
Re: A New Genetic Clue to How Humans Got Such Big Brains
Reply #10
Clastieeeeeeee!
Who even made the rule that we cannot group ducks and fish together for the simple reason that they are both aquatic? If I want to group them that way and it serves my purpose then I can jolly well do it however I want to and it is still a nested hierarchy and you can't tell me that it's not.

Re: A New Genetic Clue to How Humans Got Such Big Brains
Reply #11
Clastieeeeeeee!

Been busy writing a paper on EUKARYOGENESIS..

Re: A New Genetic Clue to How Humans Got Such Big Brains
Reply #12
 
Clastieeeeeeee!

Been busy writing a paper on EUKARYOGENESIS..
Care to give us an excerpt?  
While you were getting your PhD in virology, I got my PhD in truth detection. :wave:  Dave Hawkins

Re: A New Genetic Clue to How Humans Got Such Big Brains
Reply #13
Clastieeeeeeee!

Been busy writing a paper on EUKARYOGENESIS..
Care to give us an excerpt?  

Clue: it is about the origins of  HISTONES.

  • Pingu
Re: A New Genetic Clue to How Humans Got Such Big Brains
Reply #14
This thread is about the origins of increased brain size.  Start your own thread if you want to talk about the origins of histones.
I have a Darwin-debased mind.

Re: A New Genetic Clue to How Humans Got Such Big Brains
Reply #15
Clastieeeeeeee!

Been busy writing a paper on EUKARYOGENESIS..
Care to give us an excerpt? 

Clue: it is about the origins of  HISTONES.
Can't you give us the abstract or something?  You're not doing alignments and counting differences again, are you?
While you were getting your PhD in virology, I got my PhD in truth detection. :wave:  Dave Hawkins

  • Monad
Re: A New Genetic Clue to How Humans Got Such Big Brains
Reply #16
This thread is about the origins of increased brain size.  Start your own thread if you want to talk about the origins of your reduced brain size.

Fixed

Re: A New Genetic Clue to How Humans Got Such Big Brains
Reply #17
Clastieeeeeeee!

Been busy writing a paper on EUKARYOGENESIS..
Care to give us an excerpt? 

Clue: it is about the origins of  HISTONES.
Can't you give us the abstract or something?  You're not doing alignments and counting differences again, are you?

Yes. It is about amino acid alignments and the differences between them. So is the paper on NOTCH.

Re: A New Genetic Clue to How Humans Got Such Big Brains
Reply #18
Clastieeeeeeee!

Been busy writing a paper on EUKARYOGENESIS..
Care to give us an excerpt? 

Clue: it is about the origins of  HISTONES.
Can't you give us the abstract or something?  You're not doing alignments and counting differences again, are you?

Yes. It is about amino acid alignments and the differences between them. So is the paper on NOTCH.

I'm sure it will be the quality of scholarship that we've all come to expect from you!
While you were getting your PhD in virology, I got my PhD in truth detection. :wave:  Dave Hawkins