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Topic: Like Animals, Plants Also Camouflage Themselves For Protection (Read 799 times) previous topic - next topic

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  • socrates1
Like Animals, Plants Also Camouflage Themselves For Protection
More fascinating material about the intelligence of Nature.
https://www.studyfinds.org/plants-camouflage-animals-protection/

  • RAFH
  • Have a life, already.
Re: Like Animals, Plants Also Camouflage Themselves For Protection
Reply #1
More fascinating material about the intelligence of Nature.
https://www.studyfinds.org/plants-camouflage-animals-protection/

Nature isn't intelligent. Not in the way you mean.
It's the result of evolution. At least the part involving life on this planet. There's a steady stream of mutations that can either improve a lineage's ability to survive, decrease it, or make no change at all, combined with changes in the environment as well as meshing with existing genes in the lineage. Those lineages that survive, survived because they got dealt a hand that worked. Those that didn't, obviously didn't get a hand that allowed them to continue. It's pretty simple. Almost too simple.
Are we there yet?

Re: Like Animals, Plants Also Camouflage Themselves For Protection
Reply #2
You'd think that if nature is intelligent enough to independently evolve camouflage in plants and animals, independently evolving flight in pterosaurs, birds, and bats ought to be piece of cake.

Wait a minute.  In the Dougiverse, evolution of a trait only happens once.  Everything with that trait has to be descended from one another, but only from species that are known.  So, either the plant evolved from the lizard or vice versa.  Perhaps he will weigh in and inform our guests which scenario he endorses.  Then we can all breathe a collective sigh of relief that he is here to settle the matter.


  • socrates1
Re: Like Animals, Plants Also Camouflage Themselves For Protection
Reply #3
Dean W has mischaracterized what I have been saying. But he will never beat Faid at that game.
As always I recommend people attend to what I have posted and not how others mischaracterize it.

  • RAFH
  • Have a life, already.
Re: Like Animals, Plants Also Camouflage Themselves For Protection
Reply #4
Dean W has mischaracterized what I have been saying. But he will never beat Faid at that game.
As always I recommend people to attend to what I have posted and not how others mischaractize it.
sucky, you didn't say anything.
Are we there yet?

  • socrates1
Re: Like Animals, Plants Also Camouflage Themselves For Protection
Reply #5
More fascinating material about the intelligence of Nature.
https://www.studyfinds.org/plants-camouflage-animals-protection/

https://www.exeter.ac.uk/news/featurednews/title_663382_en.html
Quote
"It seems that plants like these know how to make the right colours by mixing a few types of pigments. Those individuals with worse colour matching might have higher risk of being eaten."

Re: Like Animals, Plants Also Camouflage Themselves For Protection
Reply #6
C'mon, Doug, stop being such an evasive pussy.  The lizard or the plant, which do you think is descended from the other?  Or is independent evolution of a particular trait feasible now in the Dougiverse, with all the devastating ramifications to your "hypotheses"?  Our guests are on tenterhooks awaiting your pronouncement.
  • Last Edit: June 13, 2018, 12:29:37 AM by Dean W

  • socrates1
Re: Like Animals, Plants Also Camouflage Themselves For Protection
Reply #7
Nature is the common designer/engineer.

  • RAFH
  • Have a life, already.
Re: Like Animals, Plants Also Camouflage Themselves For Protection
Reply #8
Nature is the common designer/engineer.
sucky, nature isn't a being.
Are we there yet?

  • socrates1
Re: Like Animals, Plants Also Camouflage Themselves For Protection
Reply #9
The RAFH lout states as it it were a fact that Nature is not a being. It is true that many (but certainly not all) folks hold that unsupported opinion.

  • RAFH
  • Have a life, already.
Re: Like Animals, Plants Also Camouflage Themselves For Protection
Reply #10
RAFH states as it it were a fact that Nature is not a being. It is true that many (but certainly not all) folks hold that unsupported opinion.
Have you support for the argument that "Nature is a being"?
Remember, the standard in science is that your argument is false. That's the base position.
Are we there yet?

  • socrates1
Re: Like Animals, Plants Also Camouflage Themselves For Protection
Reply #11
More fascinating material about the intelligence of Nature.
https://www.studyfinds.org/plants-camouflage-animals-protection/

https://www.exeter.ac.uk/news/featurednews/title_663382_en.html
Quote
"It seems that plants like these know how to make the right colours by mixing a few types of pigments. Those individuals with worse colour matching might have higher risk of being eaten."
Back to the plants and camouflage.
Quote
Unlike animals, plants may be limited in their use of camouflage by the fact that chlorophyll - which they need to live via photosynthesis - is green.
As a result, the researchers say it may sometimes be a disadvantage to a plant to be any other colour - meaning their camouflage comes at a cost.

  • RAFH
  • Have a life, already.
Re: Like Animals, Plants Also Camouflage Themselves For Protection
Reply #12
More fascinating material about the intelligence of Nature.
https://www.studyfinds.org/plants-camouflage-animals-protection/

https://www.exeter.ac.uk/news/featurednews/title_663382_en.html
Quote
"It seems that plants like these know how to make the right colours by mixing a few types of pigments. Those individuals with worse colour matching might have higher risk of being eaten."
Back to the plants and camouflage.
Quote
Unlike animals, plants may be limited in their use of camouflage by the fact that chlorophyll - which they need to live via photosynthesis - is green.
As a result, the researchers say it may sometimes be a disadvantage to a plant to be any other colour - meaning their camouflage comes at a cost.
Oh, quite. Didn't like that question, so you will ignore it.

By the way, a disadvantage is just a negative advantage. Everything comes at a cost in the real world. Everything. Just some things also produce a positive effect.

Also by the way, not all photosynthesis is represented by the reflection of green light. Red can also indicate photosynthesis. Remember, the colors we see are not the colors that do the absorbing, they are the colors that are reflected and so do not absorb, or absorb less than than the other colors. "Red" Photosynthesis

Unsurprisingly, this has been common knowledge from the very start of the study of photosynthesis, back in the 16th Century.
Are we there yet?

  • socrates1
Re: Like Animals, Plants Also Camouflage Themselves For Protection
Reply #13
Quote
Examples of camouflage methods apparently used by both plants and animals include:

Background matching - blending with the colours of shapes of the habitat where they live.
Disruptive coloration - markings that create the appearance of false edges and boundaries, making it harder to see the true outline.
Masquerade - looking like something else; usually something a predator might ignore, such a stone or twig. Examples include living stones, some cacti, passion vines and mistletoes.
Decoration - accumulating material from the environment. For example, some coastal and dune plants get covered by sand because of their sticky glandular trichomes, making them less conspicuous.

  • RAFH
  • Have a life, already.
Re: Like Animals, Plants Also Camouflage Themselves For Protection
Reply #14
Quote
Examples of camouflage methods apparently used by both plants and animals include:

Background matching - blending with the colours of shapes of the habitat where they live.
Disruptive coloration - markings that create the appearance of false edges and boundaries, making it harder to see the true outline.
Masquerade - looking like something else; usually something a predator might ignore, such a stone or twig. Examples include living stones, some cacti, passion vines and mistletoes.
Decoration - accumulating material from the environment. For example, some coastal and dune plants get covered by sand because of their sticky glandular trichomes, making them less conspicuous.

Is there any point you'd like to be making?
Are we there yet?

  • Fenrir
Re: Like Animals, Plants Also Camouflage Themselves For Protection
Reply #15
Quote
Examples of camouflage methods apparently used by both plants and animals include:

Background matching - blending with the colours of shapes of the habitat where they live.
Disruptive coloration - markings that create the appearance of false edges and boundaries, making it harder to see the true outline.
Masquerade - looking like something else; usually something a predator might ignore, such a stone or twig. Examples include living stones, some cacti, passion vines and mistletoes.
Decoration - accumulating material from the environment. For example, some coastal and dune plants get covered by sand because of their sticky glandular trichomes, making them less conspicuous.

Is there any point you'd like to be making?


Whoa, steady on, this is still page one, that would be indecently hasty.

It will be at least 10 more pages before Socrates even lets on what the topic is, let alone what he's implying about it.
It's what plants crave.

  • RAFH
  • Have a life, already.
Re: Like Animals, Plants Also Camouflage Themselves For Protection
Reply #16
Quote
Examples of camouflage methods apparently used by both plants and animals include:

Background matching - blending with the colours of shapes of the habitat where they live.
Disruptive coloration - markings that create the appearance of false edges and boundaries, making it harder to see the true outline.
Masquerade - looking like something else; usually something a predator might ignore, such a stone or twig. Examples include living stones, some cacti, passion vines and mistletoes.
Decoration - accumulating material from the environment. For example, some coastal and dune plants get covered by sand because of their sticky glandular trichomes, making them less conspicuous.

Is there any point you'd like to be making?


Whoa, steady on, this is still page one, that would be indecently hasty.

It will be at least 10 more pages before Socrates even lets on what the topic is, let alone what he's implying about it.
OK, but by then I'll be zoning out on Ben Ure Island at at Deception Pass. I'll miss the debut.
Are we there yet?

  • Fenrir
Re: Like Animals, Plants Also Camouflage Themselves For Protection
Reply #17
Quote
<snippety snip>

Is there any point you'd like to be making?


Whoa, steady on, this is still page one, that would be indecently hasty.

It will be at least 10 more pages before Socrates even lets on what the topic is, let alone what he's implying about it.
OK, but by then I'll be zoning out on Ben Ure Island at at Deception Pass. I'll miss the debut.

Are you suggesting there might be an actual something to miss? That would indeed be a first.
It's what plants crave.

  • RAFH
  • Have a life, already.
Re: Like Animals, Plants Also Camouflage Themselves For Protection
Reply #18
Quote
<snippety snip>

Is there any point you'd like to be making?


Whoa, steady on, this is still page one, that would be indecently hasty.

It will be at least 10 more pages before Socrates even lets on what the topic is, let alone what he's implying about it.
OK, but by then I'll be zoning out on Ben Ure Island at at Deception Pass. I'll miss the debut.

Are you suggesting there might be an actual something to miss? That would indeed be a first.
Content wise, no. But him actually making a debut of establishing the point he's trying to intimate would be historic. Not the sort of history that books are reading about but history nonetheless.

Do you know what a reamer is?
Perhaps you're thinking of a machinists tool. That is called a reamer but in this case, it's not what's being referred to.
I'l say this much, there's a national group specifically dedicated to this sort of reamer.
Are we there yet?

  • socrates1
Re: Like Animals, Plants Also Camouflage Themselves For Protection
Reply #19
Quote
Examples of camouflage methods apparently used by both plants and animals include:

Background matching - blending with the colours of shapes of the habitat where they live.
Disruptive coloration - markings that create the appearance of false edges and boundaries, making it harder to see the true outline.
Masquerade - looking like something else; usually something a predator might ignore, such a stone or twig. Examples include living stones, some cacti, passion vines and mistletoes.
Decoration - accumulating material from the environment. For example, some coastal and dune plants get covered by sand because of their sticky glandular trichomes, making them less conspicuous.

These are intelligent modes of defense designed/engineered by Nature.

Re: Like Animals, Plants Also Camouflage Themselves For Protection
Reply #20
Quote
Examples of camouflage methods apparently used by both plants and animals include:

Background matching - blending with the colours of shapes of the habitat where they live.
Disruptive coloration - markings that create the appearance of false edges and boundaries, making it harder to see the true outline.
Masquerade - looking like something else; usually something a predator might ignore, such a stone or twig. Examples include living stones, some cacti, passion vines and mistletoes.
Decoration - accumulating material from the environment. For example, some coastal and dune plants get covered by sand because of their sticky glandular trichomes, making them less conspicuous.

These are intelligent modes of defense designed/engineered by Nature.
Who designed/engineered the stupid modes of attack of the predators? Also Nature?

  • RAFH
  • Have a life, already.
Re: Like Animals, Plants Also Camouflage Themselves For Protection
Reply #21
Better yet, what idiot designed sucky?
Are we there yet?

  • socrates1
Re: Like Animals, Plants Also Camouflage Themselves For Protection
Reply #22
Quote
Examples of camouflage methods apparently used by both plants and animals include:

Background matching - blending with the colours of shapes of the habitat where they live.
Disruptive coloration - markings that create the appearance of false edges and boundaries, making it harder to see the true outline.
Masquerade - looking like something else; usually something a predator might ignore, such a stone or twig. Examples include living stones, some cacti, passion vines and mistletoes.
Decoration - accumulating material from the environment. For example, some coastal and dune plants get covered by sand because of their sticky glandular trichomes, making them less conspicuous.

These are intelligent modes of defense designed/engineered by Nature.
Looks like nobody is able to deal with this. I understand.

Re: Like Animals, Plants Also Camouflage Themselves For Protection
Reply #23
Quote
Examples of camouflage methods apparently used by both plants and animals include:

Background matching - blending with the colours of shapes of the habitat where they live.
Disruptive coloration - markings that create the appearance of false edges and boundaries, making it harder to see the true outline.
Masquerade - looking like something else; usually something a predator might ignore, such a stone or twig. Examples include living stones, some cacti, passion vines and mistletoes.
Decoration - accumulating material from the environment. For example, some coastal and dune plants get covered by sand because of their sticky glandular trichomes, making them less conspicuous.

These are intelligent modes of defense designed/engineered by Nature.
Looks like nobody is able to deal with this. I understand.

Do you understand?  Really understand?

  • RAFH
  • Have a life, already.
Re: Like Animals, Plants Also Camouflage Themselves For Protection
Reply #24
I don't think he does. I don't think he really does. I really, really don't.
Are we there yet?