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Topic: I am an Islamophobe. If you are not, you might not be a moral person. (Read 663 times) previous topic - next topic

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I am an Islamophobe. If you are not, you might not be a moral person.
I am an Islamophobe. If you are not, you might not be a moral person.

Some Muslims follow an ideology, as written in their religious writing, which allows slavery of Muslim women. This sect of Islam allows the sale of child brides to others within their cult. These people want a Caliphate that promotes and uses slavery. 

The Muslim men in this slave holding cult have submitted to Allah and are eager slaves to him thanks to the pleasant heavenly gifts he promises. They believe themselves to be favored by God and hate all those who are not.    

History of religion, especially Christianity, shows that when a belief is strong, even if miss-guided, ends all compromise within the believer. Thus is born Inquisitions, Jihads, Honor killing and murder of non-believers and apostates.
 
The assumptions that these people make of God, without any proof and based on the supernatural and the writings of imperfect men, become so arrogant, that they act as slave traders based on their beliefs without regard for moral and ethical standards. They in fact break their own reciprocity rules.

These Muslims allow this theological certainty to create a tyrannical cult of slaved men who then make second class slaves out of their female children. Naming these Muslim women and girl's chattel would be an understatement. They are truly slaves, as Allah demands.
 
These Muslims imitate their slave holding master, Allah, and like all tyrants, hate all others not of their ilk. They allow their hate to push them to violence against the free people in the free world.

Islamophobia is a fear of Islam. Those who do not fear and hate this slave holding cult of Islam, along with the other inhuman and immoral policies that Islam and Sharia allow, are not moral people. Moral people will fight against slavery.

I fear that free people will not be Islamophobic enough, because of their fear of being labelled racist or Islamophobe, to rise up and give secours to the unwilling female slave of Islam.

I am proudly an Islamophobe. If you are not you might not be a moral person.

Are you a moral person?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nri300CcCuE

Regards
DL

Re: I am an Islamophobe. If you are not, you might not be a moral person.
Reply #1
When you masturbate to images of arabs, do you scream out curses?
Love is like a magic penny
 if you hold it tight you won't have any
if you give it away you'll have so many
they'll be rolling all over the floor

Re: I am an Islamophobe. If you are not, you might not be a moral person.
Reply #2
I am a religionophobe, but I don't hate religious people.

People who use fairy tales as justification for hate, cruelty or death upon others, are pretty crazy and morally bankrupt IMHO, no matter what brand of religious crap they subscribe to.

Any social animal from bumble bees to humans, has the problem of trying to reconcile two perceived realities: the perceived reality that they from sensing and processing natural phenomena, and the perceived social reality of their group, tribe or hive.

What we can infer is that all religions are potentially addictive agents. Like all addictive agents [such as psycho-active drugs], individual response is variable. But basically, any addictive agent can mess with the pleasure/goal/reward centres of the brain, causing changes which can compromise morality and cognition. The brain is a heuristic computer after all. Addiction tends to substitute long term goals with sort term goals, ie, getting the next 'fix". For an alcoholic, one drink is never enough. But not everyone who has a beer or a glass of wine will turn into an alcoholic.

Of course, one can get religious apologists claiming that "Islamic terrorists" [same-same for all religions] are not "True Muslims", thus making a "No True Scotsman" fallacy. Partly because there is no reliable link between religion-ism and violent radicalism. Indeed, a dose of more moderate religious teaching can sometimes moderate radicalism, but that isn't a reliable solution either. Perhaps because it is a little more successful than giving an alcoholic a drink, people think it is an effective way to combat "religious" terrorism.

Probably more effective is more education, giving people a much more diverse intellectual base to work from. Knowledge of all religions, scientific literacy and so on, would seem to be a better way of promoting tolerance and understanding between peoples.

Religion is a type of self-medication, and like all attempts to self-medicate, has the potential for side effects to occur, not least the possibility of addiction. Most religions appeal by selling the false idea that humans are imperfect [true], but guilty and responsible for their imperfections, and only through salvation via a deity, or via some special way of living [Buddhists], can they achieve peace and harmony.
HTH. 

Believer in High Powers, and naturally, logarithms.
Pikkiwoki is the one true god.

Re: I am an Islamophobe. If you are not, you might not be a moral person.
Reply #3
I sit on the fence. I'm sure there are loads of Muslims, who are OK, peaceful people. But I think for them to be OK, (from my point of view), they'd have to be ignorant of, or cherry pick or re-interpret parts of their scriptural source, the Qur'an. On the other hand there are also loads of Muslims whose ideas, philosophies, theologies, practices would scare the poop out of me. And those latter ones probably get justification from their religious book.

But if you take the Bible literally, you have the same problem. To be an OK religious person of the Muslim or Christian faith, you have to  be ignorant of, or cherry pick or re-interpret parts of the scriptural sources.

So if Islam is what's in the book, and what it permits, then yes, I'm an Islamophobe.  But if Christianity is what's in their book, and what it permits, then, I'm an Christophobe too.

Cognitive Ease:
The More You Hear Something, the Easier it is to Believe

  • Fenrir
Re: I am an Islamophobe. If you are not, you might not be a moral person.
Reply #4
Read the OP replacing every instance of "muslim" or "islam" with "xian". Nothing changes, all charges are just as valid, excepting of course than some bigotted nutter can't feel as smugly superior that way*.

*next they'll turn up claiming "I'm not a xian, I'm this other vaguely defined loosely affiliated thing based on the same novel that hardly anyone is, that makes my bigoted discharges even more superiorer and betterer!!1!1"
It's what plants crave.

Re: I am an Islamophobe. If you are not, you might not be a moral person.
Reply #5
Read the OP replacing every instance of "muslim" or "islam" with "xian". Nothing changes, all charges are just as valid, excepting of course than some bigotted nutter can't feel as smugly superior that way*.

*next they'll turn up claiming "I'm not a xian, I'm this other vaguely defined loosely affiliated thing based on the same novel that hardly anyone is, that makes my bigoted discharges even more superiorer and betterer!!1!1"

And also a "phobia", by definition, is the "irrational fear" of something.

A dislike of religions is not irrational, because, being faith-based, there is likely to be a lack of logic and or evidence for a particular position taken. Not that the non-religious are immune from ignoring or denying evidence or applying good logic, but religions tend to set people up to fail in a systematic way.
Almost always, a cleric will advise one of their flock to retreat and pray and chant when they have a crisis of faith or doubt. And of course, most social networks use these techniques for ideological or political reasons. Most leaders find it inconvenient if their followers actually think for themselves. But, anyway, religion, like war is just politics continued by other  means-for good or bad.
Believer in High Powers, and naturally, logarithms.
Pikkiwoki is the one true god.

  • nesb
Re: I am an Islamophobe. If you are not, you might not be a moral person.
Reply #6
Guys. GIA is a white supremacist.

"The white DNA is the most advance and I just think it would be a shame to lose the best that the human race has produced to date." -Greatest Iam

He's really not worth acknowledging or responding to.

Re: I am an Islamophobe. If you are not, you might not be a moral person.
Reply #7
Guys. GIA is a white supremacist.

"The white DNA is the most advance and I just think it would be a shame to lose the best that the human race has produced to date." -Greatest Iam

He's really not worth acknowledging or responding to.
For a white supremacist he doesn't seem to be a very superior person, but then very, very few of them are.
Believer in High Powers, and naturally, logarithms.
Pikkiwoki is the one true god.

Re: I am an Islamophobe. If you are not, you might not be a moral person.
Reply #8
And also a "phobia", by definition, is the "irrational fear" of something.

As a stand-alone word, yes. However, as a noun-combining suffix, it can also mean "intolerance or aversion for." The argument made by so-called Islamophobes that "I ain't afraid of Islam/Muslims so I'm certainly not an Islamophobe" is inaccurate and/or disingenuous.

As for Greatest Iam, he's demonstrated repeatedly and unequivocally that he's simply a  turd. All else follows from that.
  • Last Edit: April 29, 2017, 04:14:31 AM by Recusant

  • Fenrir
Re: I am an Islamophobe. If you are not, you might not be a moral person.
Reply #9
And turds are brown. Self loathing is a terrible thing.
It's what plants crave.

Re: I am an Islamophobe. If you are not, you might not be a moral person.
Reply #10
I am a religionophobe, but I don't hate religious people.

People who use fairy tales as justification for hate, cruelty or death upon others, are pretty crazy and morally bankrupt IMHO, no matter what brand of religious crap they subscribe to.

Any social animal from bumble bees to humans, has the problem of trying to reconcile two perceived realities: the perceived reality that they from sensing and processing natural phenomena, and the perceived social reality of their group, tribe or hive.

What we can infer is that all religions are potentially addictive agents. Like all addictive agents [such as psycho-active drugs], individual response is variable. But basically, any addictive agent can mess with the pleasure/goal/reward centres of the brain, causing changes which can compromise morality and cognition. The brain is a heuristic computer after all. Addiction tends to substitute long term goals with sort term goals, ie, getting the next 'fix". For an alcoholic, one drink is never enough. But not everyone who has a beer or a glass of wine will turn into an alcoholic.

Of course, one can get religious apologists claiming that "Islamic terrorists" [same-same for all religions] are not "True Muslims", thus making a "No True Scotsman" fallacy. Partly because there is no reliable link between religion-ism and violent radicalism. Indeed, a dose of more moderate religious teaching can sometimes moderate radicalism, but that isn't a reliable solution either. Perhaps because it is a little more successful than giving an alcoholic a drink, people think it is an effective way to combat "religious" terrorism.

Probably more effective is more education, giving people a much more diverse intellectual base to work from. Knowledge of all religions, scientific literacy and so on, would seem to be a better way of promoting tolerance and understanding between peoples.

Religion is a type of self-medication, and like all attempts to self-medicate, has the potential for side effects to occur, not least the possibility of addiction. Most religions appeal by selling the false idea that humans are imperfect [true], but guilty and responsible for their imperfections, and only through salvation via a deity, or via some special way of living [Buddhists], can they achieve peace and harmony.
HTH. 

You show a lot of negatives within religions. I see a lot of dislike for them in what you put so eloquently above. I have to wonder why you have not let your justified dislike move to hate.

I do see a correlation between religions and violence.

Pleas view this link and wonder about all the wars that religions have started in the last 5,000 years. And yes, I recognize that some were secular, so here I am speaking more of Inquisitions, holy wars and Jihads.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oR02ciandvg&feature=BFa&list=PLCBF574D

Regards
DL


Re: I am an Islamophobe. If you are not, you might not be a moral person.
Reply #11
I sit on the fence. I'm sure there are loads of Muslims, who are OK, peaceful people. But I think for them to be OK, (from my point of view), they'd have to be ignorant of, or cherry pick or re-interpret parts of their scriptural source, the Qur'an. On the other hand there are also loads of Muslims whose ideas, philosophies, theologies, practices would scare the poop out of me. And those latter ones probably get justification from their religious book.

But if you take the Bible literally, you have the same problem. To be an OK religious person of the Muslim or Christian faith, you have to  be ignorant of, or cherry pick or re-interpret parts of the scriptural sources.

So if Islam is what's in the book, and what it permits, then yes, I'm an Islamophobe.  But if Christianity is what's in their book, and what it permits, then, I'm an Christophobe too.

Nice. Thanks for this.

Christianity, if the West had not forced it to reform, or if it had not self-reformed, would have been outlawed just like I hope Islam get's outlawed in the West. The West should not be seen as harboring a slave holding religion.

Regards
DL

Re: I am an Islamophobe. If you are not, you might not be a moral person.
Reply #12
Read the OP replacing every instance of "muslim" or "islam" with "xian". Nothing changes, all charges are just as valid, excepting of course than some bigotted nutter can't feel as smugly superior that way*.

*next they'll turn up claiming "I'm not a xian, I'm this other vaguely defined loosely affiliated thing based on the same novel that hardly anyone is, that makes my bigoted discharges even more superiorer and betterer!!1!1"

I agree to a point. Please read the post just above.

Regards
DL

Re: I am an Islamophobe. If you are not, you might not be a moral person.
Reply #13
Guys. GIA is a white supremacist.

"The white DNA is the most advance and I just think it would be a shame to lose the best that the human race has produced to date." -Greatest Iam

He's really not worth acknowledging or responding to.

My native wife would disagree ass hole.

Regards
DL

  • borealis
  • Administrator
Re: I am an Islamophobe. If you are not, you might not be a moral person.
Reply #14
Guys. GIA is a white supremacist.

"The white DNA is the most advance and I just think it would be a shame to lose the best that the human race has produced to date." -Greatest Iam

He's really not worth acknowledging or responding to.

My native wife would disagree ass hole.

Regards
DL
Does your 'native' (native of where?) wife know you think her DNA is inferior to yours?

Re: I am an Islamophobe. If you are not, you might not be a moral person.
Reply #15
I am a religionophobe, but I don't hate religious people.

People who use fairy tales as justification for hate, cruelty or death upon others, are pretty crazy and morally bankrupt IMHO, no matter what brand of religious crap they subscribe to.

Any social animal from bumble bees to humans, has the problem of trying to reconcile two perceived realities: the perceived reality that they from sensing and processing natural phenomena, and the perceived social reality of their group, tribe or hive.

What we can infer is that all religions are potentially addictive agents. Like all addictive agents [such as psycho-active drugs], individual response is variable. But basically, any addictive agent can mess with the pleasure/goal/reward centres of the brain, causing changes which can compromise morality and cognition. The brain is a heuristic computer after all. Addiction tends to substitute long term goals with sort term goals, ie, getting the next 'fix". For an alcoholic, one drink is never enough. But not everyone who has a beer or a glass of wine will turn into an alcoholic.

Of course, one can get religious apologists claiming that "Islamic terrorists" [same-same for all religions] are not "True Muslims", thus making a "No True Scotsman" fallacy. Partly because there is no reliable link between religion-ism and violent radicalism. Indeed, a dose of more moderate religious teaching can sometimes moderate radicalism, but that isn't a reliable solution either. Perhaps because it is a little more successful than giving an alcoholic a drink, people think it is an effective way to combat "religious" terrorism.

Probably more effective is more education, giving people a much more diverse intellectual base to work from. Knowledge of all religions, scientific literacy and so on, would seem to be a better way of promoting tolerance and understanding between peoples.

Religion is a type of self-medication, and like all attempts to self-medicate, has the potential for side effects to occur, not least the possibility of addiction. Most religions appeal by selling the false idea that humans are imperfect [true], but guilty and responsible for their imperfections, and only through salvation via a deity, or via some special way of living [Buddhists], can they achieve peace and harmony.
HTH. 

You show a lot of negatives within religions. I see a lot of dislike for them in what you put so eloquently above. I have to wonder why you have not let your justified dislike move to hate.

I do see a correlation between religions and violence.

Pleas view this link and wonder about all the wars that religions have started in the last 5,000 years. And yes, I recognize that some were secular, so here I am speaking more of Inquisitions, holy wars and Jihads.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oR02ciandvg&feature=BFa&list=PLCBF574D

Regards
DL


Use your hate, Luke.
Love is like a magic penny
 if you hold it tight you won't have any
if you give it away you'll have so many
they'll be rolling all over the floor

Re: I am an Islamophobe. If you are not, you might not be a moral person.
Reply #16
GIA wrote:-

Quote
You show a lot of negatives within religions. I see a lot of dislike for them in what you put so eloquently above. I have to wonder why you have not let your justified dislike move to hate.

Because hate takes something away from you. Hate can eat you up, so if I do hate, I hate sparingly [if at all]. Second, I only try to hate the act or the thing, not the person.

Lastly, although I believe religions are a net negative, I do not deny they can motivate people to do acts of kindness, generosity etc.

Some religious groups can be less unlikable than others: Quakers for example, or some Buddhists. As far as individuals go, there is huge variation.
Unlike Dawkins, I don't think that religions are the root of all evil. As social animals, we behave well, and sometimes behave appallingly.

Although we don't need science [and in fact can't use science] to answer ethical questions, knowing the facts is certainly going to aid one more than just faith is some old mumbo-jumbo.

For example, persecuting, abusing, harming LGTBQI folks just because they are different makes no sense from basic humanistic principles.  It just happens to be icing on the cake that science now informs us that such people are as normal as anyone else, and it is just a part of natural variation, and not some dysfunction, disease or sin.
Believer in High Powers, and naturally, logarithms.
Pikkiwoki is the one true god.

Re: I am an Islamophobe. If you are not, you might not be a moral person.
Reply #17

I sniped your eloquent post for brevity.

Because hate takes something away from you. Hate can eat you up, so if I do hate, I hate sparingly [if at all]. Second, I only try to hate the act or the thing, not the person.

I see hate also adding to us.

Let me ask you, if someone rapes your child, do you end in hating the sin and loving the rapist?

Can you really separate the perpetrator from the act?

If you can, then why would you seek to punish the person and not the act?

I can appreciate that the rapist was not born that way and is a product of all who interacted with him, but that does not forgive him or cause me to love him while hating only what he did.

Regards
DL





Re: I am an Islamophobe. If you are not, you might not be a moral person.
Reply #18

I sniped your eloquent post for brevity.

Because hate takes something away from you. Hate can eat you up, so if I do hate, I hate sparingly [if at all]. Second, I only try to hate the act or the thing, not the person.

I see hate also adding to us.

Let me ask you, if someone rapes your child, do you end in hating the sin and loving the rapist?

Can you really separate the perpetrator from the act?
If you can, then why would you seek to punish the person and not the act?
I can appreciate that the rapist was not born that way and is a product of all who interacted with him, but that does not forgive him or cause me to love him while hating only what he did.
Regards
DL

My instinct on confronting a rapist, especially of a child, would indeed be hateful and revengeful. And of course, the outrage visited on one's own children would make that urge greater still.

But ask yourself why we have division of powers in the law?

1. We have parliaments that make statute law.
2. We have police that enforce the law.
3. We have courts which decide the law based on the facts of the case.
4. Sentencing on a guilty verdict is a separate process?
5 We have prisons separate independent of the above.

Why bother with any of it?

But suppose I, a father blind with rage, murders the person I suspect as the rapist of my child?

It does not take a genius to work out how such a society would end up. In barbarism. And very quickly.

People are incarcerated for all sorts of reasons:-

1. Protection of the community
2. Reforming the prisoners behaviour.
3. Punishment/revenge.

One's attitude to hating the act or the person committing the act is relevant to the attitude you might take for the reasons of imprisonment.

We see this most clearly with the death penalty. Clearly, an advocate of the DP is not interested in community safety, because incarceration provides that, not are they interested in rehabilitation of the prisoner, because death makes rehab pointless. No, they are only interested in punishment and revenge.

If that were not enough, the DP is irreversable. With wrongful imprisonment one can say "oops!" sorry buddy, off you go you are free, and better yet compensate the person for imprisoning them for a crime they did not commit. There was a recent case near where I live, the DNA test was fucked up.

Look anecdotes never prove an argument, but I will tell you a story. I was bullied for over a year by a big ape. I lost all self-esteem. it made me hate going to school. Then one day I snapped. I saw him ride by on a bike past my parent's garage. I was working on a car [it was the weekend]. I had a large wench in my hand and just charged at his jeering stupid face and knocked him off the bike. I was going to kill him. He knew it, and I knew it. Then I realised he was a coward, pleading for his life. Who knows, the world might be better off without him. I was not afraid of jail or consequences like that. I had sunk pretty low, but did not want to be a murderer. I did not kill him for ME. Not for him, not for society but for me. It seemed to me to be the right choice, because he never bullied me or anyone else again [as far as I know], I went to senior high school in another town about three months later.

Believer in High Powers, and naturally, logarithms.
Pikkiwoki is the one true god.

Re: I am an Islamophobe. If you are not, you might not be a moral person.
Reply #19

Let me ask you, if someone rapes your child, do you end in hating the sin and loving the rapist?

u asking for a friend?

Re: I am an Islamophobe. If you are not, you might not be a moral person.
Reply #20

I sniped your eloquent post for brevity.

Because hate takes something away from you. Hate can eat you up, so if I do hate, I hate sparingly [if at all]. Second, I only try to hate the act or the thing, not the person.

I see hate also adding to us.

Let me ask you, if someone rapes your child, do you end in hating the sin and loving the rapist?

Can you really separate the perpetrator from the act?
If you can, then why would you seek to punish the person and not the act?
I can appreciate that the rapist was not born that way and is a product of all who interacted with him, but that does not forgive him or cause me to love him while hating only what he did.
Regards
DL

My instinct on confronting a rapist, especially of a child, would indeed be hateful and revengeful. And of course, the outrage visited on one's own children would make that urge greater still.

But ask yourself why we have division of powers in the law?

1. We have parliaments that make statute law.
2. We have police that enforce the law.
3. We have courts which decide the law based on the facts of the case.
4. Sentencing on a guilty verdict is a separate process?
5 We have prisons separate independent of the above.

Why bother with any of it?

But suppose I, a father blind with rage, murders the person I suspect as the rapist of my child?

It does not take a genius to work out how such a society would end up. In barbarism. And very quickly.

People are incarcerated for all sorts of reasons:-

1. Protection of the community
2. Reforming the prisoners behaviour.
3. Punishment/revenge.

One's attitude to hating the act or the person committing the act is relevant to the attitude you might take for the reasons of imprisonment.

We see this most clearly with the death penalty. Clearly, an advocate of the DP is not interested in community safety, because incarceration provides that, not are they interested in rehabilitation of the prisoner, because death makes rehab pointless. No, they are only interested in punishment and revenge.

If that were not enough, the DP is irreversable. With wrongful imprisonment one can say "oops!" sorry buddy, off you go you are free, and better yet compensate the person for imprisoning them for a crime they did not commit. There was a recent case near where I live, the DNA test was fucked up.

Look anecdotes never prove an argument, but I will tell you a story. I was bullied for over a year by a big ape. I lost all self-esteem. it made me hate going to school. Then one day I snapped. I saw him ride by on a bike past my parent's garage. I was working on a car [it was the weekend]. I had a large wench in my hand and just charged at his jeering stupid face and knocked him off the bike. I was going to kill him. He knew it, and I knew it. Then I realised he was a coward, pleading for his life. Who knows, the world might be better off without him. I was not afraid of jail or consequences like that. I had sunk pretty low, but did not want to be a murderer. I did not kill him for ME. Not for him, not for society but for me. It seemed to me to be the right choice, because he never bullied me or anyone else again [as far as I know], I went to senior high school in another town about three months later.

Thanks for this.

I was not advocating for chaos, revenge seeking, vigilantism or anarchy in the minds of those who recognize that hate has a place within us.

I would recommend using it as motivation to end whatever evil is being hated in whatever way seems worthy to the one who hates a particular evil.

Your hate of your bully motivated you to be brave enough to teach him a lesson and who knows how many of your friends or neighbors you might have saved from that prick.

That is how hate should be used.

Regards
DL


Re: I am an Islamophobe. If you are not, you might not be a moral person.
Reply #21
That is exactly how isis uses it.
Love is like a magic penny
 if you hold it tight you won't have any
if you give it away you'll have so many
they'll be rolling all over the floor

Re: I am an Islamophobe. If you are not, you might not be a moral person.
Reply #22
That is exactly how isis uses it.

Yes, and so does the West towards the bully that has made slaves of their women and female children.

I hope our bully wins as I think the first duty of a free person is to insure that all of us are free and not slaves.

What do you see as your first duty as a free person?

Regards
DL

Re: I am an Islamophobe. If you are not, you might not be a moral person.
Reply #23
That is exactly how isis uses it.

Yes, and so does the West towards the bully that has made slaves of their women and female children.

I hope our bully wins as I think the first duty of a free person is to insure that all of us are free and not slaves.

What do you see as your first duty as a free person?

Regards
DL
to enjoy good situations and to try not to make bad situations worse.
Love is like a magic penny
 if you hold it tight you won't have any
if you give it away you'll have so many
they'll be rolling all over the floor

Re: I am an Islamophobe. If you are not, you might not be a moral person.
Reply #24
That is exactly how isis uses it.

Yes, and so does the West towards the bully that has made slaves of their women and female children.

I hope our bully wins as I think the first duty of a free person is to insure that all of us are free and not slaves.

What do you see as your first duty as a free person?

Regards
DL
to enjoy good situations and to try not to make bad situations worse.

IOW. Be centered on the self and not follow the Golden Rule.

For evil to grow, all good people need do is as you do.

Regards
DL