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Topic: The Cat Thread (Read 5142 times) previous topic - next topic

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  • borealis
  • Administrator
Re: The Cat Thread
Reply #175
Exactly. Making it illegal takes away the vets' burden of having to constantly explain to clueless owners why it's a terrible idea.

Re: The Cat Thread
Reply #176
I've never seen a declawed cat but I've had my share of kitten scratched furniture. What does it do to the cat? I mean, we also neuter the boys and from my perspective I can't even.
Love is like a magic penny
 if you hold it tight you won't have any
if you give it away you'll have so many
they'll be rolling all over the floor

  • borealis
  • Administrator
Re: The Cat Thread
Reply #177
I've never seen a declawed cat but I've had my share of kitten scratched furniture. What does it do to the cat? I mean, we also neuter the boys and from my perspective I can't even.

We neuter the girls also, a somewhat more complex and invasive procedure than neutering the boys. But neutering bestows long term benefits to both the cats in particular, cats in general, and to wild prey animals. Neutered Toms are less inclined to wandering and fighting, and won't contribute to overpopulation. Cat fights often result in abcessed wounds from bites and clawings. Neutered Queens may live longer, will not suffer reproductive diseases or complications, and won't contribute to overpopulation.

Castrating a male cat is normally a simple, very safe, and not very painful procedure. The cat will act pretty normally as soon as the anaesthetic wears off. Females will heal normally within a few days.

Declawing is a much more painful procedure resulting in long term pain and psychological distress. It offers no benefit to the cat, in fact disables it for life.

It is entirely possible to teach your cat not to claw furniture. Give them things they can scratch, and persistently remove them from inappropriate scratching spots. There is also a natural product - bitter lemon, iirc - your vet probably has it - that is intensely bitter but has no odour. My cats, and my dog, wouldn't touch any surface sprayed with it.

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The Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery published a study in which a total of 274 cats were monitored. Half of the felines already had their claws removed. The researchers observed the cats in their everyday lives and provided each with thorough health exams. Their results showed the cats who had undergone the declawing surgery were more prone to behaviors including aggression and over-grooming. They bit humans more often and refused to use the litter box.
Researchers concluded these behaviors to be three to seven times more common in declawed cats. As for the health of the cats, those without claws were three times more likely to experience chronic back pain than their clawed feline friends.

In order to completely remove the claw, part of the bone is also taken. The toe is amputated at the first knuckle, and bone, tendons, and claw are removed all at once. This is done ten times on each of a cat's front paws. In the countries where it's illegal, including the UK, Germany, Switzerland, and Sweden, declawing cats is considered to be a form of mutilation.
Declawing is extremely painful, and cats express their pain in ways that some humans may not understand. They're grumpy because they're hurting, and they're aggressive because they have no other way to tell humans something is wrong. Their chronic back pain is most likely a result of the cat being forced to change its gait due to its shortened limbs.
In the study, 63 of the declawed cats experienced pain at the surgery site long after the procedure. Others showed signs of lameness and an unwillingness to move or bear weight on the affected paws.

https://iheartcats.com/study-reveals-the-long-term-side-effects-of-declawing-cats/



Quote
Declawing traditionally involves the amputation of the last bone of each toe [including claw]. If performed on a human being, it would be like cutting off each finger at the last knuckle.

Quote
Medical drawbacks to declawing include pain in the paw, infection, tissue necrosis (tissue death), lameness, and back pain. Removing claws changes the way a cat's foot meets the ground and can cause pain similar to wearing an uncomfortable pair of shoes. There can also be a regrowth of improperly removed claws, nerve damage, and bone spurs.
For several days after surgery, shredded newspaper is typically used in the litter box to prevent litter from irritating declawed feet. This unfamiliar litter substitute, accompanied by pain when scratching in the box, may lead cats to stop using the litter box. Some cats may become biters because they no longer have their claws for defense.

http://www.humanesociety.org/animals/cats/tips/declawing.html


Re: The Cat Thread
Reply #178
Yuck.
Love is like a magic penny
 if you hold it tight you won't have any
if you give it away you'll have so many
they'll be rolling all over the floor

  • meepmeep
  • Administrator
  • zombiecat queen
Re: The Cat Thread
Reply #179