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Topic: "Raw water" is apparently a thing now (Read 638 times) previous topic - next topic

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  • meepmeep
  • Administrator
  • zombiecat queen
"Raw water" is apparently a thing now
This is the dumbest thing I've read in a long time.

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/12/29/dining/raw-water-unfiltered.html

Quote
SAN FRANCISCO -- At Rainbow Grocery, a cooperative in this city's Mission District, one brand of water is so popular that it's often out of stock. But one recent evening, there was a glittering rack of it: glass orbs containing 2.5 gallons of what is billed as "raw water" -- unfiltered, untreated, unsterilized spring water, $36.99 each and $14.99 per refill, bottled and marketed by a small company called Live Water.

"It has a vaguely mild sweetness, a nice smooth mouth feel, nothing that overwhelms the flavor profile," said Kevin Freeman, a shift manager at the store. "Bottled water's controversial. We've curtailed our water selection. But this is totally outside that whole realm."

Quote
And Liquid Eden, a water store that opened in San Diego three years ago, offers a variety of options, including fluoride-free, chlorine-free and a "mineral electrolyte alkaline" drinking water that goes for $2.50 a gallon.

Trisha Kuhlmey, the owner, said the shop sells about 900 gallons of water a day, and sales have doubled every year as the "water consciousness movement" grows.

What adherents share is a wariness of tap water, particularly the fluoride added to it and the lead pipes that some of it passes through. They contend that the wrong kind of filtration removes beneficial minerals. Even traditional bottled spring water is treated with ultraviolet light or ozone gas and passed through filters to remove algae. That, they say, kills healthful bacteria -- "probiotics" in raw-water parlance.

Quote
The most prominent proponent of raw water is Doug Evans, a Silicon Valley entrepreneur. After his juicing company, Juicero, collapsed in September, he went on a 10-day cleanse, drinking nothing but Live Water. "I haven't tasted tap water in a long time," he said.

Before he could order raw water on demand, Mr. Evans went "spring hunting" with friends. This has become more challenging lately: The closest spring around San Francisco has recently been cut off by landslides, so reaching it means crossing private property, which he does under cover of night.

"You have to be agile and tactile, and be available to experiment," he said. "Literally, you have to carry bottles of water through the dark."

At Burning Man, the summer festival in the Nevada desert that attracts the digerati and others, Mr. Evans and his R.V. mate brought 50 gallons of spring water they had collected. "I'm extreme about health, I know, but I'm not alone with this," Mr. Evans said. "There are a lot of people doing this with me. You never know who you'll run into at the spring."

lmao juicero guy hahahahahahahahahaha

Quote
The founder of Live Water, Mukhande Singh, started selling spring water from Opal Springs in Culver, Ore., three years ago, but it was a small local operation until this year. Marketing materials show Mr. Singh (né Christopher Sanborn) sitting naked and cross-legged on a hot spring, his long brown hair flowing over his chest.

lololol né Christopher Sanborn

Quote
Pure water can be obtained by using a reverse osmosis filter, the gold standard of home water treatment, but for Mr. Singh, the goal is not pristine water, per se. "You're going to get 99 percent of the bad stuff out," he said. "But now you have dead water."

He said "real water" should expire after a few months. His does. "It stays most fresh within one lunar cycle of delivery," he said. "If it sits around too long, it'll turn green. People don't even realize that because all their water's dead, so they never see it turn green."

Mr. Singh believes that public water has been poisoned. "Tap water? You're drinking toilet water with birth control drugs in them," he said. "Chloramine, and on top of that they're putting in fluoride. Call me a conspiracy theorist, but it's a mind-control drug that has no benefit to our dental health." (There is no scientific evidence that fluoride is a mind-control drug, but plenty to show that it aids dental health.)

 :hmm:

Quote
"Fluoride? It's a deathly toxic chemical," said Vanessa Kuemmerle of Emeryville, Calif., who does landscape design for large tech companies. She said she was an early adopter of raw water, and has noticed many of her clients following suit.

"They're health-conscious people that understand the bigger picture of what's going on," she said. "Everyone's looking for an edge: nootropics, Bulletproof coffee, better water."

The health benefits she reported include better skin and the need to drink less water. "My skin's plumper," she said. "And I feel like I'm getting better nutrition from the food I eat."

Getting better nutrition.

:hmm:

Quote
"I don't like 'raw water' because it sort of makes people think of raw sewage," Mr. Vitalis said. "When you say 'live water,' that's going to trigger a lot of people who are into physics and biology. Is it alive?"

lmao

I want to send all of these Silicon Valley idiot hippies to parts of the world where people have no choice but to drink "raw water" so they can experience the magical benefits of all of the awesome deadly bacteria and viruses and protozoa and assorted fucking parasites out there. Guinea worm disease is totally organic! And the worms eat all the toxins in your body as they tear through your flesh!

Re: "Raw water" is apparently a thing now
Reply #1
finally

Re: "Raw water" is apparently a thing now
Reply #2
so here is my question: does "raw water" have a legal definition? Cause if not.........

Re: "Raw water" is apparently a thing now
Reply #3
I want to smack people very hard when they confuse Fluorine and fluoride. Because of course they never make the same mistake about Chlorine and (sodium) chloride.
Why do I bother?

Re: "Raw water" is apparently a thing now
Reply #4
My mother's name is Florine

  • borealis
  • Administrator
Re: "Raw water" is apparently a thing now
Reply #5
I'm sure the beavers that swim in my lake make the water more live than it is after it goes through my ultraviolet filter.  :happydance:

  • Martin.au
  • Thingyologist
Re: "Raw water" is apparently a thing now
Reply #6
Lol. So Water from a spring fresh enough to drink? Basically that"s likely to be recent rainfall with crap in it.
"That which can be asserted with evidence can also be dismissed without evidence." (Dave Hawkins)

  • JonF
Re: "Raw water" is apparently a thing now
Reply #7
[

"I would never consider my evaluation of his work to be fair minded unless I had actually read his own words." - Dave Hawkins

  • borealis
  • Administrator
Re: "Raw water" is apparently a thing now
Reply #8
Lol. So Water from a spring fresh enough to drink? Basically that"s likely to be recent rainfall with crap in it.

There are springs safe enough to drink from, at least in this province, but I'd want the water tested regularly.

  • nostrum
  • easily led
Re: "Raw water" is apparently a thing now
Reply #9
I want to smack people very hard when they confuse Fluorine and fluoride. Because of course they never make the same mistake about Chlorine and (sodium) chloride.

is that what it's about? always mystified me, the carry on

  • Martin.au
  • Thingyologist
Re: "Raw water" is apparently a thing now
Reply #10
Lol. So Water from a spring fresh enough to drink? Basically that"s likely to be recent rainfall with crap in it.

There are springs safe enough to drink from, at least in this province, but I'd want the water tested regularly.

Yeah, but you're on a shield, iirc. Around San Fran it's all neotectonics and converging margins. In those areas I'd expect groundwater salinity to link to distance travelled and age, as it pulls ions out of young, unweathered rocks. I could be wrong. This is very broad brush opinion.

ETA: most groundwater is "rainfall with crap in it". However, in an area likesan Fran, I'd want to be damn careful about how old it is and how much crap it has picked up from the surface. It could be their spring is very young water, full of toxins from the last 200 years of development.
  • Last Edit: December 30, 2017, 05:24:20 PM by Martin.au
"That which can be asserted with evidence can also be dismissed without evidence." (Dave Hawkins)

  • borealis
  • Administrator
Re: "Raw water" is apparently a thing now
Reply #11
Lol. So Water from a spring fresh enough to drink? Basically that"s likely to be recent rainfall with crap in it.

There are springs safe enough to drink from, at least in this province, but I'd want the water tested regularly.

Yeah, but you're on a shield, iirc. Around San Fran it's all neotectonics and converging margins. In those areas I'd expect groundwater salinity to link to distance travelled and age, as it pulls ions out of young, unweathered rocks. I could be wrong. This is very broad brush opinion.

Not a shield as such but several ancient eroded mountain ranges and glacial lowlands (and some other stuff).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nova_Scotia_peninsula

Some springs, esp. roadside ones, are often unsafe because of local contaminants.

  • osmanthus
  • Administrator
  • Fingerer of piglets
Re: "Raw water" is apparently a thing now
Reply #12
Quote
"Chloramine, and on top of that they're putting in fluoride. Call me a conspiracy theorist, but it's a mind-control drug that has no benefit to our dental health." (There is no scientific evidence that fluoride is a mind-control drug, but plenty to show that it aids dental health.)
Someone recommended a local dentist to me. Said they were really good. Seemed competent enough, but one day she started going on about fluoride being a mind control drug. I now have another dentist, who seems to be even more competent without being bonkers.

I do live in an area where we rely on filtered rainwater from a tank for drinking, so there is no fluoride in my water supply. Definitely use fluoride toothpaste though, ever since I found out about its benefits. Nor have I noticed any mind control properties since I started using it. Politicians seem just as full of shit as they were before I started using it. If fluoride is intended to make the sheeple more compliant, it doesn't seem to be very effective.
Truth is out of style

  • MikeB
Re: "Raw water" is apparently a thing now
Reply #13
This is the first I've heard of "mind control".  Is that the same as public education and moreso the public happy juice to produce citizens compliant in supporting society so the power elites can do the same as always?

No, and yes I'm unhappily coming to understand.

  • Fenrir
Re: "Raw water" is apparently a thing now
Reply #14
Quote
"Chloramine, and on top of that they're putting in fluoride. Call me a conspiracy theorist, but it's a mind-control drug that has no benefit to our dental health." (There is no scientific evidence that fluoride is a mind-control drug, but plenty to show that it aids dental health.)
Someone recommended a local dentist to me. Said they were really good. Seemed competent enough, but one day she started going on about fluoride being a mind control drug. I now have another dentist, who seems to be even more competent without being bonkers.

I do live in an area where we rely on filtered rainwater from a tank for drinking, so there is no fluoride in my water supply. Definitely use fluoride toothpaste though, ever since I found out about its benefits. Nor have I noticed any mind control properties since I started using it. Politicians seem just as full of shit as they were before I started using it. If fluoride is intended to make the sheeple more compliant, it doesn't seem to be very effective.

Well you wouldn't, would you?

Just goes to show how devious and malevolent they are and incontovertibly proves the existence of the NWO lizards.



*spelling error deliberate.
It's what plants crave.

  • osmanthus
  • Administrator
  • Fingerer of piglets
Re: "Raw water" is apparently a thing now
Reply #15
It's probably because I only use fluoride toothpaste, so only my teeth are brainwashed. The rest seems to be ok, but I haven't surveyed the opinions of my teeth recently so don't know how compliant to authority they are. As long as they obey me, I don't really care either.
Truth is out of style

  • osmanthus
  • Administrator
  • Fingerer of piglets
Re: "Raw water" is apparently a thing now
Reply #16
Truth is out of style

  • meepmeep
  • Administrator
  • zombiecat queen
Re: "Raw water" is apparently a thing now
Reply #17
This is the dumbest thing I've read in a long time.

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/12/29/dining/raw-water-unfiltered.html
Try some Dave threads.


Reading Dave's threads is also incredibly dumb, yes.

  • VoxRat
  • wtactualf
Re: "Raw water" is apparently a thing now
Reply #18
Quote
"Chloramine, and on top of that they're putting in fluoride. Call me a conspiracy theorist, but it's a mind-control drug that has no benefit to our dental health." (There is no scientific evidence that fluoride is a mind-control drug, but plenty to show that it aids dental health.)
Someone recommended a local dentist to me. Said they were really good. Seemed competent enough, but one day she started going on about fluoride being a mind control drug. I now have another dentist, who seems to be even more competent without being bonkers.

I do live in an area where we rely on filtered rainwater from a tank for drinking, so there is no fluoride in my water supply. Definitely use fluoride toothpaste though, ever since I found out about its benefits. Nor have I noticed any mind control properties since I started using it. Politicians seem just as full of shit as they were before I started using it. If fluoride is intended to make the sheeple more compliant, it doesn't seem to be very effective.
I had a discussion with my dentist about fluoride. He said that far and away the most significant effect of fluoride was on developing teeth. I.e.  a systemic effect on the very young.  He said, yes, there is some benefit to topical fluoride (as in fluoridated toothpaste, or while fluoridated water is in your mouth prior to swallowing it) but this is relatively trivial.
"I understand Donald Trump better than many people because I really am a lot like him." - Dave Hawkins

  • F X
  • The one and only
Re: "Raw water" is apparently a thing now
Reply #19
Fluoride is really good to brush your teeth with.  It's really bad to get to much of it in your water.

"If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and man."
― Mark Twain 🔭

  • RickB
Re: "Raw water" is apparently a thing now
Reply #20
Fluoride is really good to brush your teeth with.  It's really bad to get to much of it in your water.




To much water is bad for you also.
As is to much oxygen.

  • meepmeep
  • Administrator
  • zombiecat queen
Re: "Raw water" is apparently a thing now
Reply #21
lol the scam was an even bigger scam:
https://www.menshealth.com/guy-wisdom/silicon-valley-raw-water-live-spring-water-overpriced

Quote
As it turns out, the "Fountain of Truth" is perfectly safe to drink. That's because it's the exact same water that flows out of the taps in Oregon. At $64 for a minimum of four jugs, that's an awful lot of money to pay for essentially the same water you can get out of your bathroom sink.

Live Water makes it look like its product has been skimmed off the surface of a magical mountain spring. Founder Mukhande Singh lives in Hawaii, and you can find him on Instagram filling glass orbs from natural water sources trickling down over jungle vegetation, or from PVC pipes protruding from springs just below the ground. Singh--whose birth name is Christopher Sanborn--says he's personally drunk from "hundreds" of natural springs and has never gotten sick. His company's site even includes a link to findaspring.com, a website for water gatherers to find naturally occurring water sources.

When raw water first started going viral, a number of other outlets reported on the dangers of collecting your drinking water directly from a spring. Given the potential health risks, we wanted to find out exactly where "Fountain of Truth" comes from.

On its website, Live Water says it's sourced from Opal Springs, Oregon, a natural spring at the bottom of a canyon near the small city of Madras. So we called Jonathan Modie, a spokesperson for the Oregon Department of Public Health, to ask what kind of water "collecting" goes on at Opal Springs.

Modie said that Opal Springs was fed by an aquifer that was able to meet all the standards for public consumption without treatment, and that the water was distributed by the Deschutes Valley Water District, a nonprofit utility company that's been in business since 1919. When we called the Deschutes Valley Water District to ask how bottling companies like Live Water get water from the spring. They made it clear that no, Singh isn't down at the bottom of the Opal Springs Canyon dunking his $33 1 gallon globes in by hand like he does on his Instagram.

"They all like to sorta imply that they're filling bottles right outta Opal Springs," Edson Pugh, the general manager, told me. "They are not down at our spring bottling directly from the source. It's the same water that we're serving our customers."

In other words, Live Water's pricey "Fountain of Truth" is just the tap water from Jefferson County, which residents get piped into their homes for about one-third of a cent per gallon.

When we asked Live Water to confirm this, Singh was open about it.

"The town of Madras, Oregon, has been drinking raw unsterilized Opal Springs water from their taps for over half a century and no one has ever gotten sick," Singh said in an email. "Our water is indeed the same water that comes out of their taps." Shortly before publication, Live Water updated its site to acknowledge this fact.

When asked why a minimum Live Water delivery costs $64, Singh replied: "Our water delivery service is so expensive as a result of our refrigerated trucks, refrigerated storage, and the cost for custom made glass jugs. We are acquiring some outside investment soon, and will be building up our infrastructure. We hope to make prices more affordable at that time."


  • Martin.au
  • Thingyologist
Re: "Raw water" is apparently a thing now
Reply #22
Well that's nowhere near san Fransisco.
"That which can be asserted with evidence can also be dismissed without evidence." (Dave Hawkins)

  • osmanthus
  • Administrator
  • Fingerer of piglets
Re: "Raw water" is apparently a thing now
Reply #23
At least it's safe to drink, which is a big bonus compared to some sources of "raw water". If nutters want to pay megabucks for it, that's their problem.
Truth is out of style

  • meepmeep
  • Administrator
  • zombiecat queen
Re: "Raw water" is apparently a thing now
Reply #24
Well that's nowhere near san Fransisco.

taking tap water and putting it in custom made glass bottles and transporting it hundreds of miles to a place where there is already drinkable tap water is going to SAVE THE PLANET, okay?

  • Martin.au
  • Thingyologist
Re: "Raw water" is apparently a thing now
Reply #25
Well that's nowhere near san Fransisco.

taking tap water and putting it in custom made glass bottles and transporting it hundreds of miles to a place where there is already drinkable tap water is going to SAVE THE PLANET, okay?
Save some people from too much disposable income anyway.

I guess one benefit about getting water from a clean spring is that it will cut down on Darwin award candidates.
"That which can be asserted with evidence can also be dismissed without evidence." (Dave Hawkins)

  • borealis
  • Administrator
Re: "Raw water" is apparently a thing now
Reply #26
Meep, I need to point out that you've now read a dumber thing than what you posted in your OP.

Tap water. Glorious. In fancy bottles.

  • meepmeep
  • Administrator
  • zombiecat queen
Re: "Raw water" is apparently a thing now
Reply #27
Well that's nowhere near san Fransisco.

taking tap water and putting it in custom made glass bottles and transporting it hundreds of miles to a place where there is already drinkable tap water is going to SAVE THE PLANET, okay?
Save some people from too much disposable income anyway.

I guess one benefit about getting water from a clean spring is that it will cut down on Darwin award candidates.

I can help save them from their disposable income if they want to pay my tuition and student loans. The carbon footprint of the electronic transfer of money into my bank account is pretty minimal compared to this fancy tap water bullshit. :meeps:

Re: "Raw water" is apparently a thing now
Reply #28
Portland water has been raw since the water system. We are just now getting some sort of expensive treatment because a federal lawsuit and they found some cryptosporidium in the lake it comes from.
Love is like a magic penny
 if you hold it tight you won't have any
if you give it away you'll have so many
they'll be rolling all over the floor

  • meepmeep
  • Administrator
  • zombiecat queen
Re: "Raw water" is apparently a thing now
Reply #29
but 2 weeks of profuse diarrhea possibly needing hospitalization never hurt anyone, testy

Re: "Raw water" is apparently a thing now
Reply #30
Well, it hasn't yet. That makes the new treatment facility timely if expensive.
Love is like a magic penny
 if you hold it tight you won't have any
if you give it away you'll have so many
they'll be rolling all over the floor