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Topic: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World) (Read 211267 times) previous topic - next topic

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Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #34075
"My theory is that you missed a huge chunk of what Judy does (I'd say that you've missed the H part of HMG) and boiled it down to a heuristic.  A heuristic is not holistic."

I don't think anybody here understands what this Gobbledy gook AKA squid ink is supposed to mean.

Uncool certainly didn't. Because he thinks that all you are saying is that I'm a human being subject to error.

So why don't you dumb this down for all of us poor plebs.

Oh, so now you've noticed that I did, in fact, tell you, and that no cat had got my tongue after all.

OK, as you are apparently too stupid to understand it, I'll try again:

My theory is that you missed a very important aspect of what Greg Judy does, which is notice stuff.  Like WHAT is growing, and how it reacts and changes, and what his cows like and don't like, and what they like to eat and don't like to eat. And what is happening on the margin of areas, and how that changes too.  And I think that is really important.  It's also very much part of HOLISTIC planned grazing, as described by many of the people who do it, including Savory.

Quote from: Allan Savory, apparently, although I got it via the Wayback Machine
Putting Holistic Management In Place

The Holistic Management decision-making framework uses six key steps to guide the management of resources:

1. Define what you are managing

By defining the whole, people are better able to manage it. The key is to get the right people to the table and identify the available resources, including money.

2. State what you want by creating a "holistic goal."

There are three components to a "holistic goal:" the quality of life a person or group of people want to experience; what has to be created or produced to live that life, and what must exist to sustain such a life far into the future.

3. Watch out for bare ground

The earliest indicator of ecosystem health is soil cover. If the land is bare and there are few other signs of life, it's a poorly functioning environment. Bare ground can have deep impacts for people in both urban and rural environments such as increased flooding and decreased food production.

4. Play with a full deck
There are eight tools for managing natural resources: money/labor, human creativity, grazing, animal impact, fire, rest, living organisms and technology. Grazing and animal impact have been added to the traditional land management toolbox to be used proactively as effective tools to restore ecosystem health.

5. Test your decisions

There are seven questions that can help you test decisions to ensure they are socially, environmentally and financially sound for both the short and long term.

6. Monitor proactively

At any time, assume your plan is wrong and use a feedback loop that includes monitoring for the earliest signs of failure, adjusting and re-planning.

As I said, I think you missed a huge chunk of what Judy does (I'd say that you've missed the H part of HMG) and boiled it down to those three words.  So you rig up a machine that does those three things, then bugger off for the day.

You miss out the NOTICING part, as far as I can tell, at least until it bites you in the butt.

But, as I say, I could be wrong.  But we won't know unless you figure out  how to measure, compare and stop assuming your conclusions.
You ARE wrong. And the reason you are wrong is because you are so damn arrogant. If you would have a little humility, you might learn something useful.

The essential keys to Greg Judy's success do not involve any of those extraneous things you mention.

Again Greg Judy's success is primarily due to the three fundamental principles of HMG...

Bunch. Move. Rest.

Of course, as I said, there are a few other secondary things that are important such as breed selection and containment system and so on. But none of those things are as important as the three fundamentals.

By the way... Greg Judy also buggers off for the day as you call it. You didn't think he stands there all day watching the cows eat grass did you?
  • Last Edit: February 13, 2018, 12:26:06 PM by Dave Hawkins

  • VoxRat
  • wtactualf
Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #34076
Yes, Fred, I understand that Pingu thinks I'm missing something big about why Greg Judy is successful, but she can't seem to explain why she thinks that I, Dave Hawkins, am too abysmally stupid to understand her explanations, no matter how far she dumbs them down for me.
fyp
  • Last Edit: February 13, 2018, 12:28:26 PM by VoxRat
"I understand Donald Trump better than many people because I really am a lot like him." - Dave Hawkins

  • Pingu
Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #34077
"My theory is that you missed a huge chunk of what Judy does (I'd say that you've missed the H part of HMG) and boiled it down to a heuristic.  A heuristic is not holistic."

I don't think anybody here understands what this Gobbledy gook AKA squid ink is supposed to mean.

Uncool certainly didn't. Because he thinks that all you are saying is that I'm a human being subject to error.

So why don't you dumb this down for all of us poor plebs.
It means that your 'Bunch. Move. Rest', while a good distillation of the process, leaves out some aspects of management that may affect, even be important to, the overall system.
That's how this plebe reads it.
"Leaves out ..."

Such as? For example?

What I said.  Read my post, instead of playing dumb.  Noticing things.  Monitoring things.  Adjusting things. Observing things.

Instead of dismissing all such stuff as "making an inventory" or a "hobby" as I think you called Greg Judy's knowledge of plants.

You give the impression (and I could be wrong) that you think that essentially all a person needs to know to be as successful as Greg Judy at the things we probably all agree are reasonably good things to be successful it is: Bunch Move Rest.

I'm saying that that might not even be the  most important thing.  The most important thing might the noticing itself - how the species that thrive in your region behave and interact. How species differ. Yet you try to apply Bunch Move Rest to bloody rabbits ffs.
I have a Darwin-debased mind.

  • Fenrir
Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #34078
Quote
Allan Savory has done the observation part for us [citation needed] although we can do our own observations as well [citation needed]. He has observed herbivores and perennials in nature and has noted that they are bunched together in much tighter groups than  for example cattle in most conventional domestic situations [citation needed]. He has observed that this creates an enormous impact on the perennial grasses [citation needed]. His next observation has been that these tight groups tend to stay on the move [citation needed]. Why? [Good question. Why do you think that might be?]

How does any of this particularly inform farm management?
It's what plants crave.

  • fredbear
  • Militantly Confused
Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #34079
"My theory is that you missed a huge chunk of what Judy does (I'd say that you've missed the H part of HMG) and boiled it down to a heuristic.  A heuristic is not holistic."

I don't think anybody here understands what this Gobbledy gook AKA squid ink is supposed to mean.

Uncool certainly didn't. Because he thinks that all you are saying is that I'm a human being subject to error.

So why don't you dumb this down for all of us poor plebs.
It means that your 'Bunch. Move. Rest', while a good distillation of the process, leaves out some aspects of management that may affect, even be important to, the overall system.
That's how this plebe reads it.
"Leaves out ..."

Such as? For example?

What I said.  Read my post, instead of playing dumb.  Noticing things.  Monitoring things.  Adjusting things. Observing things.

Instead of dismissing all such stuff as "making an inventory" or a "hobby" as I think you called Greg Judy's knowledge of plants.

You give the impression (and I could be wrong) that you think that essentially all a person needs to know to be as successful as Greg Judy at the things we probably all agree are reasonably good things to be successful it is: Bunch Move Rest.

I'm saying that that might not even be the  most important thing.  The most important thing might the noticing itself - how the species that thrive in your region behave and interact. How species differ. Yet you try to apply Bunch Move Rest to bloody rabbits ffs.
In addition, you seem not to have realized that 2 goats on 10 acres is unlikely to have much of an impact on said 10 acres no matter how they are managed.
"...without considering any evidence at all - that my views are more likely - on average - to be correct.  Because the mainstream is almost always wrong" - Dave Hawkins

  • VoxRat
  • wtactualf
Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #34080
Yet you try to apply Bunch Move Rest to bloody rabbits ffs.
inorite?    :rofl: 
"I understand Donald Trump better than many people because I really am a lot like him." - Dave Hawkins

  • Pingu
Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #34081
"My theory is that you missed a huge chunk of what Judy does (I'd say that you've missed the H part of HMG) and boiled it down to a heuristic.  A heuristic is not holistic."

I don't think anybody here understands what this Gobbledy gook AKA squid ink is supposed to mean.

Uncool certainly didn't. Because he thinks that all you are saying is that I'm a human being subject to error.

So why don't you dumb this down for all of us poor plebs.

Oh, so now you've noticed that I did, in fact, tell you, and that no cat had got my tongue after all.

OK, as you are apparently too stupid to understand it, I'll try again:

My theory is that you missed a very important aspect of what Greg Judy does, which is notice stuff.  Like WHAT is growing, and how it reacts and changes, and what his cows like and don't like, and what they like to eat and don't like to eat. And what is happening on the margin of areas, and how that changes too.  And I think that is really important.  It's also very much part of HOLISTIC planned grazing, as described by many of the people who do it, including Savory.

Quote from: Allan Savory, apparently, although I got it via the Wayback Machine
Putting Holistic Management In Place

The Holistic Management decision-making framework uses six key steps to guide the management of resources:

1. Define what you are managing

By defining the whole, people are better able to manage it. The key is to get the right people to the table and identify the available resources, including money.

2. State what you want by creating a "holistic goal."

There are three components to a "holistic goal:" the quality of life a person or group of people want to experience; what has to be created or produced to live that life, and what must exist to sustain such a life far into the future.

3. Watch out for bare ground

The earliest indicator of ecosystem health is soil cover. If the land is bare and there are few other signs of life, it's a poorly functioning environment. Bare ground can have deep impacts for people in both urban and rural environments such as increased flooding and decreased food production.

4. Play with a full deck
There are eight tools for managing natural resources: money/labor, human creativity, grazing, animal impact, fire, rest, living organisms and technology. Grazing and animal impact have been added to the traditional land management toolbox to be used proactively as effective tools to restore ecosystem health.

5. Test your decisions

There are seven questions that can help you test decisions to ensure they are socially, environmentally and financially sound for both the short and long term.

6. Monitor proactively

At any time, assume your plan is wrong and use a feedback loop that includes monitoring for the earliest signs of failure, adjusting and re-planning.

As I said, I think you missed a huge chunk of what Judy does (I'd say that you've missed the H part of HMG) and boiled it down to those three words.  So you rig up a machine that does those three things, then bugger off for the day.

You miss out the NOTICING part, as far as I can tell, at least until it bites you in the butt.

But, as I say, I could be wrong.  But we won't know unless you figure out  how to measure, compare and stop assuming your conclusions.
You ARE wrong.

Well, I realise you think so.  I think you are.  But you can't seem to engage with the issue of how we could determine which of us is correct, even though you yourself raised the question.

And the reason you are wrong is because you are so damn arrogant. If you would have a little humility, you might learn something useful.

:ironicat:


The essential keys to Greg Judy's success do not involve any of those extraneous things you mention.

Again Greg Judy's success is primarily due to the three fundamental principles of HMG...

Bunch. Move. Rest.

I know that's what you think.  However, it may not be true.  Telling me that it's true over and over doesn't prove that it is. 


Of course, as I said, there are a few other secondary things that are important such as breed selection and containment system and so on. But none of those things are as important as the three fundamentals.

Again, I know that's what you think. 

By the way... Greg Judy also buggers off for the day as you call it. You didn't think he stands there all day watching the cows eat grass did you?

You really are a very stupid man.
I have a Darwin-debased mind.

  • Faid
Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #34082
"My theory is that you missed a huge chunk of what Judy does (I'd say that you've missed the H part of HMG) and boiled it down to a heuristic.  A heuristic is not holistic."

I don't think anybody here understands what this Gobbledy gook AKA squid ink is supposed to mean.

Uncool certainly didn't. Because he thinks that all you are saying is that I'm a human being subject to error.

So why don't you dumb this down for all of us poor plebs.

Oh, so now you've noticed that I did, in fact, tell you, and that no cat had got my tongue after all.

OK, as you are apparently too stupid to understand it, I'll try again:

My theory is that you missed a very important aspect of what Greg Judy does, which is notice stuff.  Like WHAT is growing, and how it reacts and changes, and what his cows like and don't like, and what they like to eat and don't like to eat. And what is happening on the margin of areas, and how that changes too.  And I think that is really important.  It's also very much part of HOLISTIC planned grazing, as described by many of the people who do it, including Savory.

Quote from: Allan Savory, apparently, although I got it via the Wayback Machine
Putting Holistic Management In Place

The Holistic Management decision-making framework uses six key steps to guide the management of resources:

1. Define what you are managing

By defining the whole, people are better able to manage it. The key is to get the right people to the table and identify the available resources, including money.

2. State what you want by creating a "holistic goal."

There are three components to a "holistic goal:" the quality of life a person or group of people want to experience; what has to be created or produced to live that life, and what must exist to sustain such a life far into the future.

3. Watch out for bare ground

The earliest indicator of ecosystem health is soil cover. If the land is bare and there are few other signs of life, it's a poorly functioning environment. Bare ground can have deep impacts for people in both urban and rural environments such as increased flooding and decreased food production.

4. Play with a full deck
There are eight tools for managing natural resources: money/labor, human creativity, grazing, animal impact, fire, rest, living organisms and technology. Grazing and animal impact have been added to the traditional land management toolbox to be used proactively as effective tools to restore ecosystem health.

5. Test your decisions

There are seven questions that can help you test decisions to ensure they are socially, environmentally and financially sound for both the short and long term.

6. Monitor proactively

At any time, assume your plan is wrong and use a feedback loop that includes monitoring for the earliest signs of failure, adjusting and re-planning.

As I said, I think you missed a huge chunk of what Judy does (I'd say that you've missed the H part of HMG) and boiled it down to those three words.  So you rig up a machine that does those three things, then bugger off for the day.

You miss out the NOTICING part, as far as I can tell, at least until it bites you in the butt.

But, as I say, I could be wrong.  But we won't know unless you figure out  how to measure, compare and stop assuming your conclusions.
You ARE wrong. And the reason you are wrong is because you are so damn arrogant. If you would have a little humility, you might learn something useful.

The essential keys to Greg Judy's success do not involve any of those extraneous things you mention.

Again Greg Judy's success is primarily due to the three fundamental principles of HMG...

Bunch. Move. Rest.

Of course, as I said, there are a few other secondary things that are important such as breed selection and containment system and so on. But none of those things are as important as the three fundamentals.

By the way... Greg Judy also buggers off for the day as you call it. You didn't think he stands there all day watching the cows eat grass did you?
Does Greg Judy immediately start the "bunch-move-rest[/i] thing in any land he leashes? Or does he observe the state of the land first?

This is a legit question. I don't know the answer- but you must, since you have studied for 6 months under him and understand him so well.
Who even made the rule that we cannot group ducks and fish together for the simple reason that they are both aquatic? If I want to group them that way and it serves my purpose then I can jolly well do it however I want to and it is still a nested hierarchy and you can't tell me that it's not.

  • uncool
Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #34083
"My theory is that you missed a huge chunk of what Judy does (I'd say that you've missed the H part of HMG) and boiled it down to a heuristic.  A heuristic is not holistic."

I don't think anybody here understands what this Gobbledy gook AKA squid ink is supposed to mean.

Uncool certainly didn't. Because he thinks that all you are saying is that I'm a human being subject to error.

So why don't you dumb this down for all of us poor plebs.

Oh, so now you've noticed that I did, in fact, tell you, and that no cat had got my tongue after all.

OK, as you are apparently too stupid to understand it, I'll try again:

My theory is that you missed a very important aspect of what Greg Judy does, which is notice stuff.  Like WHAT is growing, and how it reacts and changes, and what his cows like and don't like, and what they like to eat and don't like to eat. And what is happening on the margin of areas, and how that changes too.  And I think that is really important.  It's also very much part of HOLISTIC planned grazing, as described by many of the people who do it, including Savory.

Quote from: Allan Savory, apparently, although I got it via the Wayback Machine
Putting Holistic Management In Place

The Holistic Management decision-making framework uses six key steps to guide the management of resources:

1. Define what you are managing

By defining the whole, people are better able to manage it. The key is to get the right people to the table and identify the available resources, including money.

2. State what you want by creating a "holistic goal."

There are three components to a "holistic goal:" the quality of life a person or group of people want to experience; what has to be created or produced to live that life, and what must exist to sustain such a life far into the future.

3. Watch out for bare ground

The earliest indicator of ecosystem health is soil cover. If the land is bare and there are few other signs of life, it's a poorly functioning environment. Bare ground can have deep impacts for people in both urban and rural environments such as increased flooding and decreased food production.

4. Play with a full deck
There are eight tools for managing natural resources: money/labor, human creativity, grazing, animal impact, fire, rest, living organisms and technology. Grazing and animal impact have been added to the traditional land management toolbox to be used proactively as effective tools to restore ecosystem health.

5. Test your decisions

There are seven questions that can help you test decisions to ensure they are socially, environmentally and financially sound for both the short and long term.

6. Monitor proactively

At any time, assume your plan is wrong and use a feedback loop that includes monitoring for the earliest signs of failure, adjusting and re-planning.

As I said, I think you missed a huge chunk of what Judy does (I'd say that you've missed the H part of HMG) and boiled it down to those three words.  So you rig up a machine that does those three things, then bugger off for the day.

You miss out the NOTICING part, as far as I can tell, at least until it bites you in the butt.

But, as I say, I could be wrong.  But we won't know unless you figure out  how to measure, compare and stop assuming your conclusions.
You ARE wrong. And the reason you are wrong is because you are so damn arrogant. If you would have a little humility, you might learn something useful.

The essential keys to Greg Judy's success do not involve any of those extraneous things you mention.

Again Greg Judy's success is primarily due to the three fundamental principles of HMG...

Bunch. Move. Rest.

Of course, as I said, there are a few other secondary things that are important such as breed selection and containment system and so on. But none of those things are as important as the three fundamentals.

By the way... Greg Judy also buggers off for the day as you call it. You didn't think he stands there all day watching the cows eat grass did you?
Dave,

Pingu's question is "How do you know?" The only answers to a "how do you know" question are "This is my reasoning" or "this is my evidence". Your post is neither. Instead, it is "This is what we know", which doesn't answer the question. It's preaching. Pingu isn't asking for a repetition. She's asking for epistemics.
  • Last Edit: February 13, 2018, 12:43:03 PM by uncool

  • Sea Star
  • Not an octohatter
Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #34084
"My theory is that you missed a huge chunk of what Judy does (I'd say that you've missed the H part of HMG) and boiled it down to a heuristic.  A heuristic is not holistic."

I don't think anybody here understands what this Gobbledy gook AKA squid ink is supposed to mean.

Uncool certainly didn't. Because he thinks that all you are saying is that I'm a human being subject to error.

So why don't you dumb this down for all of us poor plebs.

Oh, so now you've noticed that I did, in fact, tell you, and that no cat had got my tongue after all.

OK, as you are apparently too stupid to understand it, I'll try again:

My theory is that you missed a very important aspect of what Greg Judy does, which is notice stuff.  Like WHAT is growing, and how it reacts and changes, and what his cows like and don't like, and what they like to eat and don't like to eat. And what is happening on the margin of areas, and how that changes too.  And I think that is really important.  It's also very much part of HOLISTIC planned grazing, as described by many of the people who do it, including Savory.

Quote from: Allan Savory, apparently, although I got it via the Wayback Machine
Putting Holistic Management In Place

The Holistic Management decision-making framework uses six key steps to guide the management of resources:

1. Define what you are managing

By defining the whole, people are better able to manage it. The key is to get the right people to the table and identify the available resources, including money.

2. State what you want by creating a "holistic goal."

There are three components to a "holistic goal:" the quality of life a person or group of people want to experience; what has to be created or produced to live that life, and what must exist to sustain such a life far into the future.

3. Watch out for bare ground

The earliest indicator of ecosystem health is soil cover. If the land is bare and there are few other signs of life, it's a poorly functioning environment. Bare ground can have deep impacts for people in both urban and rural environments such as increased flooding and decreased food production.

4. Play with a full deck
There are eight tools for managing natural resources: money/labor, human creativity, grazing, animal impact, fire, rest, living organisms and technology. Grazing and animal impact have been added to the traditional land management toolbox to be used proactively as effective tools to restore ecosystem health.

5. Test your decisions

There are seven questions that can help you test decisions to ensure they are socially, environmentally and financially sound for both the short and long term.

6. Monitor proactively

At any time, assume your plan is wrong and use a feedback loop that includes monitoring for the earliest signs of failure, adjusting and re-planning.

As I said, I think you missed a huge chunk of what Judy does (I'd say that you've missed the H part of HMG) and boiled it down to those three words.  So you rig up a machine that does those three things, then bugger off for the day.

You miss out the NOTICING part, as far as I can tell, at least until it bites you in the butt.

But, as I say, I could be wrong.  But we won't know unless you figure out  how to measure, compare and stop assuming your conclusions.
You ARE wrong. And the reason you are wrong is because you are so damn arrogant. If you would have a little humility, you might learn something useful.

The essential keys to Greg Judy's success do not involve any of those extraneous things you mention.

Again Greg Judy's success is primarily due to the three fundamental principles of HMG...

Bunch. Move. Rest.

Of course, as I said, there are a few other secondary things that are important such as breed selection and containment system and so on. But none of those things are as important as the three fundamentals.

By the way... Greg Judy also buggers off for the day as you call it. You didn't think he stands there all day watching the cows eat grass did you?
Although some are more important than others, they all work together so you need to make sure all of the are optimized for the system.
For example, from Pingu's quote from Savory,
''6. Monitor proactively

At any time, assume your plan is wrong and use a feedback loop that includes monitoring for the earliest signs of failure, adjusting and re-planning''.

I get the impression from your posts that you don't do much precise measuring. I know in dairy production, output is generally measured in weight. You have mentioned measurements like 'a little more than half a gallon' Or 'almost a gallon between two goats'.
That's not really accurate enough to track output usefully.
Quote from: Dave Hawkins on Today at 07:50:40 AM
Lol
Sea Star has been trolling me this whole time.

Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #34085
"My theory is that you missed a huge chunk of what Judy does (I'd say that you've missed the H part of HMG) and boiled it down to a heuristic.  A heuristic is not holistic."

I don't think anybody here understands what this Gobbledy gook AKA squid ink is supposed to mean.

Uncool certainly didn't. Because he thinks that all you are saying is that I'm a human being subject to error.

So why don't you dumb this down for all of us poor plebs.
It means that your 'Bunch. Move. Rest', while a good distillation of the process, leaves out some aspects of management that may affect, even be important to, the overall system.
That's how this plebe reads it.
"Leaves out ..."

Such as? For example?
For example, one does not move a mob to a clock and calendar. One has to take into account the condition of the pasture and the animals.
Okay, but that's a subpoint Under The Heading of "Move."

Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #34086
I'm not optimistic about you being able to explain this sensibly.

Because after all, you don't even know what the word holistic means as you have demonstrated over and over again here at this forum.
Says the person who provided a clear renouncement of holism yesterday.
tell me about the rabbits, George.
Love is like a magic penny
 if you hold it tight you won't have any
if you give it away you'll have so many
they'll be rolling all over the floor

  • Sea Star
  • Not an octohatter
Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #34087
"My theory is that you missed a huge chunk of what Judy does (I'd say that you've missed the H part of HMG) and boiled it down to a heuristic.  A heuristic is not holistic."

I don't think anybody here understands what this Gobbledy gook AKA squid ink is supposed to mean.

Uncool certainly didn't. Because he thinks that all you are saying is that I'm a human being subject to error.

So why don't you dumb this down for all of us poor plebs.
It means that your 'Bunch. Move. Rest', while a good distillation of the process, leaves out some aspects of management that may affect, even be important to, the overall system.
That's how this plebe reads it.
"Leaves out ..."

Such as? For example?
For example, one does not move a mob to a clock and calendar. One has to take into account the condition of the pasture and the animals.
Okay, but that's a subpoint Under The Heading of "Move."
"My theory is that you missed a huge chunk of what Judy does (I'd say that you've missed the H part of HMG) and boiled it down to a heuristic.  A heuristic is not holistic."

I don't think anybody here understands what this Gobbledy gook AKA squid ink is supposed to mean.

Uncool certainly didn't. Because he thinks that all you are saying is that I'm a human being subject to error.

So why don't you dumb this down for all of us poor plebs.
It means that your 'Bunch. Move. Rest', while a good distillation of the process, leaves out some aspects of management that may affect, even be important to, the overall system.
That's how this plebe reads it.
"Leaves out ..."

Such as? For example?
For example, one does not move a mob to a clock and calendar. One has to take into account the condition of the pasture and the animals.
Okay, but that's a subpoint Under The Heading of "Move."
Oh, okay. What sort of measurements have you kept on pasture conditions? what metrics are you using?
Quote from: Dave Hawkins on Today at 07:50:40 AM
Lol
Sea Star has been trolling me this whole time.

Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #34088
The most important metric will be carrying capacity measured in animal units. I have been way under stocked up until now. The addition of the four sheep and the cow gets me a lot closer to having the correct stocking rate.  But it may be 2 or 3 years before I see a definite increase in carrying capacity.

  • VoxRat
  • wtactualf
Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #34089
How is carrying capacity measured?
"I understand Donald Trump better than many people because I really am a lot like him." - Dave Hawkins

  • Sea Star
  • Not an octohatter
Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #34090
The most important metric will be carrying capacity measured in animal units. I have been way under stocked up until now. The addition of the four sheep and the cow gets me a lot closer to having the correct stocking rate.  But it may be 2 or 3 years before I see a definite increase in carrying capacity.
Oh, okay. What sort of measurements have you kept on pasture conditions? what metrics are you using?
Quote from: Dave Hawkins on Today at 07:50:40 AM
Lol
Sea Star has been trolling me this whole time.

  • Pingu
Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #34091
How is carrying capacity measured?

It's the correct stocking rate.
I have a Darwin-debased mind.

Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #34092
How is carrying capacity measured?
By how many animal units you can keep on a given acreage. One animal unit equals the equivalent of one 1000 pound non lactating cow

  • Pingu
Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #34093
How is carrying capacity measured?
By how many animal units you can keep on a given acreage. One animal unit equals the equivalent of one 1000 pound non lactating cow

So how do you measure how many animals units you can keep on your acreage?

I have a Darwin-debased mind.

  • VoxRat
  • wtactualf
Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #34094
How is carrying capacity measured?
By how many animal units you can keep on a given acreage. One animal unit equals the equivalent of one 1000 pound non lactating cow

:facepalm:

How do you determine  how many animal units you can keep on a given acreage ?
"I understand Donald Trump better than many people because I really am a lot like him." - Dave Hawkins

  • Pingu
Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #34095
This is amazing.
I have a Darwin-debased mind.

  • Pingu
Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #34096
 :stareicide:
I have a Darwin-debased mind.

  • Sea Star
  • Not an octohatter
Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #34097
Quote from: Dave Hawkins on Today at 07:50:40 AM
Lol
Sea Star has been trolling me this whole time.

Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #34098
At this point I can only guess what my carrying capacity is. A dairy cow counts for at least one and a half animal units, maybe two. And I really don't know how many sheep and goats it takes to equal one animal unit ... assuming I keep all offspring on site until they reach 9 months of age, I'm guessing that 3 to 4 ewes / goats with their offspring might equal one animal unit.

  • Sea Star
  • Not an octohatter
Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #34099
At this point I can only guess what my carrying capacity is. A dairy cow counts for at least one and a half animal units, maybe two. And I really don't know how many sheep and goats it takes to equal one animal unit ... assuming I keep all offspring on site until they reach 9 months of age, I'm guessing that 3 to 4 ewes / goats with their offspring might equal one animal unit.
Oh, okay. What sort of measurements have you kept on pasture conditions? what metrics are you using?
Quote from: Dave Hawkins on Today at 07:50:40 AM
Lol
Sea Star has been trolling me this whole time.