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Topic: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World) (Read 210881 times) previous topic - next topic

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  • Pingu
Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #34925
I know you guys don't accept this but all deserts are man-made. It's true whether you want to believe it or not.
Can you please explain how humans made Antarctica a desert? Thanks!

Hey, Dave ^^^
I have a Darwin-debased mind.

  • Sea Star
  • Not an octohatter
Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #34926
My leader-follower moving pen system seems to be working well. Of course I won't consider it to be really proven until we've gone through at least a full year with everyone having their offspring successfully and so on. Target date for drying off the cow is February 25th which is less than a week away but she is still giving about 1/2 gallon per day.  My biggest question introducing the cow to this system was will she be getting enough to eat? and it does seem that she is. I will be introducing chickens again and we'll have to do some heavy duty training with my dog. I would like to try again with a piglet as well once the calf is born and I have excess milk.
Dave, what is your plan for calving? Is this Natalie's first calf?
Quote from: Dave Hawkins on Today at 07:50:40 AM
Lol
Sea Star has been trolling me this whole time.

Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #34927
No Ben. No Martin. Not even going to refute your nonsensical statements.
So, you don't think the optimum would be to squish as many cows as possible onto a pasture? So your definition of "living cells per unit area" as a measure of the health of an ecosystem is not actually useful?

And you don't think humans made Antarctica a desert? So your statement that "all deserts are man-made" is wrong?

It wouldn't kill you to admit when you got certain things wrong, Dave. It's how people learn.

  • Sea Star
  • Not an octohatter
Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #34928
No Ben. No Martin. Not even going to refute your nonsensical statements.

Moving on now that people have no excuse for not understanding "the basics." Yes I saved them off so I can repost them from time to time for people that can't keep up.
You don't seem to understand 'the basics' yourself, Dave. Try understanding the objections to your claims, then refute them.  Then we can move on.
Quote from: Dave Hawkins on Today at 07:50:40 AM
Lol
Sea Star has been trolling me this whole time.

Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #34929
My leader-follower moving pen system seems to be working well.

So tethering a cow ahead of a winch-drawn pen is a "leader-follower" system is it?
Yes

Weird nomenclature.
What's weird?  The cow leads and gets first choice of forage.  The sheep and goats follow and get second choice.  Joel Salatin lets chickens follow cattle approx 4 days behind them.  Mark Shepard has a leader follower system on his property (or did) ... I think it's a local rancher that comes in and operates it.
  • Last Edit: February 19, 2018, 06:31:52 AM by Dave Hawkins

  • VoxRat
  • wtactualf
Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #34930
But I DO have my head around "the basics" of all those various fields. 
Buy I DO have my head around "the basics" of all those various fields. 

Not even close.

:sadyes: 
"I understand Donald Trump better than many people because I really am a lot like him." - Dave Hawkins

Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #34931
My leader-follower moving pen system seems to be working well. Of course I won't consider it to be really proven until we've gone through at least a full year with everyone having their offspring successfully and so on. Target date for drying off the cow is February 25th which is less than a week away but she is still giving about 1/2 gallon per day.  My biggest question introducing the cow to this system was will she be getting enough to eat? and it does seem that she is. I will be introducing chickens again and we'll have to do some heavy duty training with my dog. I would like to try again with a piglet as well once the calf is born and I have excess milk.
Dave, what is your plan for calving? Is this Natalie's first calf?
No.  She's calved unassisted 3 years in a row ... I wouldn't have bought her in the first place if this had not been the case.  When she's about ready to calve, I will separate her from the RoboPen for a day or two on a semi-fixed tether until I see that the calf can walk and keep up with Mom.  Same for the goats when they kid in May.  Sheep will lamb in April and I will probably have to keep them in the pen and move it manually which will be a pain for a day or two but you can't tether sheep.

  • RAFH
  • Have a life, already.
Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #34932
No Ben. No Martin. Not even going to refute your nonsensical statements.

Moving on now that people have no excuse for not understanding "the basics." Yes I saved them off so I can repost them from time to time for people that can't keep up.

Once again, like most militantly ignorant narcissistic DK posterboys, you confuse and conflate "understanding" what some one is saying with "agreeing" with what they are saying.

It may come as some surprise to you Bluffy, though there's no reason it should given the number of times you've been told by virtually everyone that they understand what you are saying about HMG, that most everyone here understands what you are saying about HMG. The issue is not a matter of understanding but of agreement. While there are some kernels of validity in your Manifesto much of it is just assertion. Assertion unsupported by any factual data, but rather just more assertions. It relies heavily upon extensive but flimsy assumptions. And it ignores any negative consequences, such as what happens when you remake the world into one giant array of 3 acre cattle ranches. It's all fine and dandy for you to say your 40 acre experiment in Guyana is not going to significantly affect the wildlife of the area and to even suppose it will be a boon to such, but that's not your end goal. Your end goal is total world domination. And in that scenario, you have no place for the rest of the biosphere, for the rest of the ecosystems that already exist. Not to mention you ignore all the problems with forcing ecosystems into existing circumstances. That strategy has not had much success other than quick profits, usually leaving the mess behind. It's like people who litter.

Think about it Bluffy, I can make a great case for making AK74s or AR15s or M4s, whatever you want to call them, for the entire population. Hey, it would be valuable jobs creation, and we need to protect ourselves from whomever, foreign or domestic, right? And, you know the little start-up gun foundry I'm discussing isn't going to have much effect nationally. How could it? But, wait, our goal is to make sure every man, woman and child over 18, months that is, has their own assault rifle and plenty of ammunition in lots of 100 round double ended clips (so 200 rounds total, just flip that clip around and you're ready for the next 12 seconds of streaming, steaming lead. Just imagine, with everyone armed with their own submachine gun, them bad guys wouldn't dare do anything, probably too scared to even come outside*.


*no doubt, bad guys often have a fairly good if perverse sense of survival. With all the shooting going on, the only safe place is a heavy nuclear attack bunker a long ways underground.
Are we there yet?

Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #34933
By the way ... this cow is just wonderful!  Great disposition.  Stands stock still while I milk her.  I don't even have to give her hay to keep her occupied while I milk.  She just stands there with her halter tied to a tree in front of my house.  Very gentle ... kinda like a big ol' dog.  The only time I've noticed any orneryness is when we traverse a particularly lush spot of grass in my pasture enroute to the milking location ... she wants to stop and graze it ... I want her to keep walking ... and sometimes she kicks up her heels and kinda bucks in protest ... sorta like a kid passing an ice cream store I guess.  If I'm not in a hurry, I let her graze the spot for 10 minutes or so before moving her on.

My milking machine is great too ... works just like it was advertised.  No washing of milk lines required.  Only thing you have to wash is the catchment bottles and the screw on tops.  It's called "Ultimate EZ"

  • RAFH
  • Have a life, already.
Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #34934
No Ben. No Martin. Not even going to refute your nonsensical statements.
So, you don't think the optimum would be to squish as many cows as possible onto a pasture? So your definition of "living cells per unit area" as a measure of the health of an ecosystem is not actually useful?

And you don't think humans made Antarctica a desert? So your statement that "all deserts are man-made" is wrong?

It wouldn't kill you to admit when you got certain things wrong, Dave. It's how people learn.
Bluffy does not need to learn.
Are we there yet?

  • RAFH
  • Have a life, already.
Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #34935
By the way ... this cow is just wonderful!  Great disposition.  Stands stock still while I milk her.  I don't even have to give her hay to keep her occupied while I milk.  She just stands there with her halter tied to a tree in front of my house.  Very gentle ... kinda like a big ol' dog.  The only time I've noticed any orneryness is when we traverse a particularly lush spot of grass in my pasture enroute to the milking location ... she wants to stop and graze it ... I want her to keep walking ... and sometimes she kicks up her heels and kinda bucks in protest ... sorta like a kid passing an ice cream store I guess.  If I'm not in a hurry, I let her graze the spot for 10 minutes or so before moving her on.

My milking machine is great too ... works just like it was advertised.  No washing of milk lines required.  Only thing you have to wash is the catchment bottles and the screw on tops.  It's called "Ultimate EZ"
Wait, are you saying you're monitoring your robocage all day long, perhaps night time as well? I thought the robocage was a set it and forget it operation. I mean, "robo".




ETA: another example of Bluffy slipping into dream state and leaking critical information.
Are we there yet?

  • Sea Star
  • Not an octohatter
Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #34936
My leader-follower moving pen system seems to be working well. Of course I won't consider it to be really proven until we've gone through at least a full year with everyone having their offspring successfully and so on. Target date for drying off the cow is February 25th which is less than a week away but she is still giving about 1/2 gallon per day.  My biggest question introducing the cow to this system was will she be getting enough to eat? and it does seem that she is. I will be introducing chickens again and we'll have to do some heavy duty training with my dog. I would like to try again with a piglet as well once the calf is born and I have excess milk.
Dave, what is your plan for calving? Is this Natalie's first calf?
No.  She's calved unassisted 3 years in a row ... I wouldn't have bought her in the first place if this had not been the case.  When she's about ready to calve, I will separate her from the RoboPen for a day or two on a semi-fixed tether until I see that the calf can walk and keep up with Mom.  Same for the goats when they kid in May.  Sheep will lamb in April and I will probably have to keep them in the pen and move it manually which will be a pain for a day or two but you can't tether sheep.
Sounds like a good plan. Smart move to not get a heifer. We will need photos of the cute little baby calf!
 I'd like to 'raise the possibility' of Natalie wanting to shelter up when she goes into labor and may want to be near or in the trees/brush.
Quote from: Dave Hawkins on Today at 07:50:40 AM
Lol
Sea Star has been trolling me this whole time.

  • Faid
Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #34937
What happened to those 'unhinged roof' plans anyway?
Who even made the rule that we cannot group ducks and fish together for the simple reason that they are both aquatic? If I want to group them that way and it serves my purpose then I can jolly well do it however I want to and it is still a nested hierarchy and you can't tell me that it's not.

  • Sea Star
  • Not an octohatter
Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #34938
By the way ... this cow is just wonderful!  Great disposition.  Stands stock still while I milk her.  I don't even have to give her hay to keep her occupied while I milk.  She just stands there with her halter tied to a tree in front of my house.  Very gentle ... kinda like a big ol' dog.  The only time I've noticed any orneryness is when we traverse a particularly lush spot of grass in my pasture enroute to the milking location ... she wants to stop and graze it ... I want her to keep walking ... and sometimes she kicks up her heels and kinda bucks in protest ... sorta like a kid passing an ice cream store I guess.  If I'm not in a hurry, I let her graze the spot for 10 minutes or so before moving her on.

My milking machine is great too ... works just like it was advertised.  No washing of milk lines required.  Only thing you have to wash is the catchment bottles and the screw on tops.  It's called "Ultimate EZ"
Cool looking milker! Electric, is it?
Quote from: Dave Hawkins on Today at 07:50:40 AM
Lol
Sea Star has been trolling me this whole time.

Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #34939
My leader-follower moving pen system seems to be working well. Of course I won't consider it to be really proven until we've gone through at least a full year with everyone having their offspring successfully and so on. Target date for drying off the cow is February 25th which is less than a week away but she is still giving about 1/2 gallon per day.  My biggest question introducing the cow to this system was will she be getting enough to eat? and it does seem that she is. I will be introducing chickens again and we'll have to do some heavy duty training with my dog. I would like to try again with a piglet as well once the calf is born and I have excess milk.
Dave, what is your plan for calving? Is this Natalie's first calf?
No.  She's calved unassisted 3 years in a row ... I wouldn't have bought her in the first place if this had not been the case.  When she's about ready to calve, I will separate her from the RoboPen for a day or two on a semi-fixed tether until I see that the calf can walk and keep up with Mom.  Same for the goats when they kid in May.  Sheep will lamb in April and I will probably have to keep them in the pen and move it manually which will be a pain for a day or two but you can't tether sheep.
Sounds like a good plan. Smart move to not get a heifer. We will need photos of the cute little baby calf!
 I'd like to 'raise the possibility' of Natalie wanting to shelter up when she goes into labor and may want to be near or in the trees/brush.
OK ... I can put her temporary tether anywhere.  If I'm near the trees, I guess I'd better watch out for those poisonous weeds! Lol  Or maybe tether the goats close by so they can eat them first!!! Hahaha

Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #34940
By the way ... this cow is just wonderful!  Great disposition.  Stands stock still while I milk her.  I don't even have to give her hay to keep her occupied while I milk.  She just stands there with her halter tied to a tree in front of my house.  Very gentle ... kinda like a big ol' dog.  The only time I've noticed any orneryness is when we traverse a particularly lush spot of grass in my pasture enroute to the milking location ... she wants to stop and graze it ... I want her to keep walking ... and sometimes she kicks up her heels and kinda bucks in protest ... sorta like a kid passing an ice cream store I guess.  If I'm not in a hurry, I let her graze the spot for 10 minutes or so before moving her on.

My milking machine is great too ... works just like it was advertised.  No washing of milk lines required.  Only thing you have to wash is the catchment bottles and the screw on tops.  It's called "Ultimate EZ"
Cool looking milker! Electric, is it?
Yes, it was cheaper than the horse powered model ... Lol

I went ahead and built a city on my property so I could have this wonderful technology ... cuz ... ya know ... you can't have high tech without cities.

  • Faid
Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #34941
Or water, apparently.
Who even made the rule that we cannot group ducks and fish together for the simple reason that they are both aquatic? If I want to group them that way and it serves my purpose then I can jolly well do it however I want to and it is still a nested hierarchy and you can't tell me that it's not.

  • Sea Star
  • Not an octohatter
Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #34942
By the way ... this cow is just wonderful!  Great disposition.  Stands stock still while I milk her.  I don't even have to give her hay to keep her occupied while I milk.  She just stands there with her halter tied to a tree in front of my house.  Very gentle ... kinda like a big ol' dog.  The only time I've noticed any orneryness is when we traverse a particularly lush spot of grass in my pasture enroute to the milking location ... she wants to stop and graze it ... I want her to keep walking ... and sometimes she kicks up her heels and kinda bucks in protest ... sorta like a kid passing an ice cream store I guess.  If I'm not in a hurry, I let her graze the spot for 10 minutes or so before moving her on.

My milking machine is great too ... works just like it was advertised.  No washing of milk lines required.  Only thing you have to wash is the catchment bottles and the screw on tops.  It's called "Ultimate EZ"
Cool looking milker! Electric, is it?
Yes, it was cheaper than the horse powered model ... Lol

I went ahead and built a city on my property so I could have this wonderful technology ... cuz ... ya know ... you can't have high tech without cities.

Jesus, Dave, I was being nice to you!
I got carpal tunnel syndrome from milking - I would have loved a gadget like that. My neighbors kept 4 cows, they had a milking machine but it needed the whole taking apart and cleaning.
Check out this hand operated shearing machine
Quote from: Dave Hawkins on Today at 07:50:40 AM
Lol
Sea Star has been trolling me this whole time.

  • Pingu
Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #34943
What happened to those unhinged roof plans anyway?

fyp

hehe
I have a Darwin-debased mind.

  • Pingu
Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #34944
I even got a battery powered milking machine for ME because the hand-pump was so arduous.
I have a Darwin-debased mind.

  • fredbear
  • Militantly Confused
Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #34945
By the way ... this cow is just wonderful!  Great disposition.  Stands stock still while I milk her.  I don't even have to give her hay to keep her occupied while I milk.  She just stands there with her halter tied to a tree in front of my house.  Very gentle ... kinda like a big ol' dog.  The only time I've noticed any orneryness is when we traverse a particularly lush spot of grass in my pasture enroute to the milking location ... she wants to stop and graze it ... I want her to keep walking ... and sometimes she kicks up her heels and kinda bucks in protest ... sorta like a kid passing an ice cream store I guess.  If I'm not in a hurry, I let her graze the spot for 10 minutes or so before moving her on.

My milking machine is great too ... works just like it was advertised.  No washing of milk lines required.  Only thing you have to wash is the catchment bottles and the screw on tops.  It's called "Ultimate EZ"
Cool looking milker! Electric, is it?
Yes, it was cheaper than the horse powered model ... Lol

I went ahead and built a city on my property so I could have this wonderful technology ... cuz ... ya know ... you can't have high tech without cities.

You've taken "idiot asshole" to a whole new level, Dave. Congratulations.
"...without considering any evidence at all - that my views are more likely - on average - to be correct.  Because the mainstream is almost always wrong" - Dave Hawkins

  • RAFH
  • Have a life, already.
Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #34946
By the way ... this cow is just wonderful!  Great disposition.  Stands stock still while I milk her.  I don't even have to give her hay to keep her occupied while I milk.  She just stands there with her halter tied to a tree in front of my house.  Very gentle ... kinda like a big ol' dog.  The only time I've noticed any orneryness is when we traverse a particularly lush spot of grass in my pasture enroute to the milking location ... she wants to stop and graze it ... I want her to keep walking ... and sometimes she kicks up her heels and kinda bucks in protest ... sorta like a kid passing an ice cream store I guess.  If I'm not in a hurry, I let her graze the spot for 10 minutes or so before moving her on.

My milking machine is great too ... works just like it was advertised.  No washing of milk lines required.  Only thing you have to wash is the catchment bottles and the screw on tops.  It's called "Ultimate EZ"
Cool looking milker! Electric, is it?
Yes, it was cheaper than the horse powered model ... Lol

I went ahead and built a city on my property so I could have this wonderful technology ... cuz ... ya know ... you can't have high tech without cities.

You've taken "idiot asshole" to a whole new level, Dave. Congratulations.
Seventh Law.
Are we there yet?

  • Sea Star
  • Not an octohatter
Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #34947
I even got a battery powered milking machine for ME because the hand-pump was so arduous.
No solar powered ones available?
Quote from: Dave Hawkins on Today at 07:50:40 AM
Lol
Sea Star has been trolling me this whole time.

  • Pingu
Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #34948
I even got a battery powered milking machine for ME because the hand-pump was so arduous.
No solar powered ones available?

I didn't check.  It was winter in Scotland at the time, so wind-power might have been more practical.
I have a Darwin-debased mind.

  • RAFH
  • Have a life, already.
Re: Economics of "Saving Agriculture" (Thereby Saving the World)
Reply #34949
I even got a battery powered milking machine for ME because the hand-pump was so arduous.
No solar powered ones available?

I didn't check.  It was winter in Scotland at the time, so wind-power might have been more practical.
Wot, you wear a little turbine on your head like a hat?



I predict this either exists or will soon.
Are we there yet?