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Topic: Kicking goals in the Age of Surveillance (Read 336 times) previous topic - next topic

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  • MSG
Kicking goals in the Age of Surveillance
 good job guys http://www.smh.com.au/technology/sci-tech/australian-learns-how-strava-heat-map-reveals-dangerous-information-from-jogging-us-soldiers-20180128-h0pq5i.html
Quote
But in war zones and deserts such as Iraq and Syria, the heat map becomes almost entirely dark - except for a few scattered pinpricks of activity.

Zooming in on those brings into focus the locations and outlines of known US military bases, as well as of other unknown and potentially sensitive sites - presumably because US soldiers and other personnel are using fitness trackers as they move around.

Air Force Colonel John Thomas, a spokesman for US Central Command, said on Sunday the US military was looking into the implications of the map.

A portion of the Strava Labs heat map from Kandahar Airfield in Afghanistan, made by tracking activities.  Photo: Screenshot from https://labs.strava.com/heatmap
braying among the ruins

  • RAFH
  • Have a life, already.
Re: Kicking goals in the Age of Surveillance
Reply #1
good job guys http://www.smh.com.au/technology/sci-tech/australian-learns-how-strava-heat-map-reveals-dangerous-information-from-jogging-us-soldiers-20180128-h0pq5i.html
Quote
But in war zones and deserts such as Iraq and Syria, the heat map becomes almost entirely dark - except for a few scattered pinpricks of activity.

Zooming in on those brings into focus the locations and outlines of known US military bases, as well as of other unknown and potentially sensitive sites - presumably because US soldiers and other personnel are using fitness trackers as they move around.

Air Force Colonel John Thomas, a spokesman for US Central Command, said on Sunday the US military was looking into the implications of the map.

A portion of the Strava Labs heat map from Kandahar Airfield in Afghanistan, made by tracking activities.  Photo: Screenshot from https://labs.strava.com/heatmap
Oops.
Are we there yet?

  • Brother Daniel
  • Global Moderator
  • predisposed to antagonism
Re: Kicking goals in the Age of Surveillance
Reply #2
I keep thinking the thread title says "Kicking goats in ...".  I guess I've read too much about Dave Hawkins's animal abuse.  :(

  • MikeS
Re: Kicking goals in the Age of Surveillance
Reply #3
I think the Pentagon just banned personal cell phones from the premesis.

  • RAFH
  • Have a life, already.
Re: Kicking goals in the Age of Surveillance
Reply #4
In Zero History, William Gibson had a minor feature, some sort of graphic that would instruct surveillance systems to ignore and discard the region around them and instead fill in the background as if they weren't there. In the book, it was printed on the book to allow a clandestine operation to be carried out with no possibility of identifying the participants.

Recently, I saw an article that actually did something close to that. Can't remember where, probably Boing Boing. Perhaps I'll spend a minimal amount of time looking for it.

As with everything in human endeavors to cope with living things, whether the coper or coped are "good" guys or "bad" guys, it'll always be a Red Queen scenario. No matter what is developed, if it's worth it, someone will figure out a way to get around it. And then someone else will figure out a way to foil that work around which in turn will be foiled. It's one of the ways we progress. I think it's called evolution.
Are we there yet?

  • MSG
Re: Kicking goals in the Age of Surveillance
Reply #5
https://www.cbsnews.com/news/digital-photocopiers-loaded-with-secrets/

Quote
It took Juntunen just 30 minutes to pull the hard drives out of the copiers. Then, using a forensic software program available for free on the Internet, he ran a scan - downloading tens of thousands of documents in less than 12 hours.

The results were stunning: from the sex crimes unit there were detailed domestic violence complaints and a list of wanted sex offenders. On a second machine from the Buffalo Police Narcotics Unit we found a list of targets in a major drug raid.

The third machine, from a New York construction company, spit out design plans for a building near Ground Zero in Manhattan; 95 pages of pay stubs with names, addresses and social security numbers; and $40,000 in copied checks.

But it wasn't until hitting "print" on the fourth machine - from Affinity Health Plan, a New York insurance company, that we obtained the most disturbing documents: 300 pages of individual medical records. They included everything from drug prescriptions, to blood test results, to a cancer diagnosis. A potentially serious breach of federal privacy law

postscript https://www.cbsnews.com/news/cbs-news-investigation-into-photocopiers-raises-questions-in-buffalo/
braying among the ruins