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Old 12-06-2011, 12:57 AM   #1623334  /  #1
SteveF
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Default The chimpanzee who sees sounds

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Chimpanzees meld sounds and colours, associating light objects with high tones and dark objects with deeper tones.

The finding hints that chimps, like humans, experience some form of synaesthesia, an uncommon condition in which the senses become intertwined, says Vera Ludwig, a cognitive neuroscientist at Charité Medical University in Berlin, Germany, who led a study published this week in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences1. Some synaesthetes associate different colours with letters and numbers, for instance, whereas others taste shapes.

Nearly all humans tend to link high-pitched sounds with lighter, brighter hues and bass-filled sounds with dark shades. People judge high vowels, such as 'mil', as white, for example, and consider lower-toned syllables, such as 'mol', as black. Ludwig thinks such connections represent a mild form of synaesthesia, with both emerging from neural cross-wiring between nearby brain regions involved in processing senses.

To determine whether humans learn to associate sounds and colours from others, or whether they are innate and do not require language, Ludwig searched for the associations in captive chimpanzees.
http://www.nature.com/news/the-chimp...-sounds-1.9541

paper:

Quote:
Ludwig, V. et al. (2011) Visuoauditory mappings between high luminance and high pitch are shared by chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and humans.

Humans share implicit preferences for certain cross-sensory combinations; for example, they consistently associate higher-pitched sounds with lighter colors, smaller size, and spikier shapes. In the condition of synesthesia, people may experience such cross-modal correspondences to a perceptual degree (e.g., literally seeing sounds). So far, no study has addressed the question whether nonhuman animals share cross-modal correspondences as well. To establish the evolutionary origins of cross-modal mappings, we tested whether chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) also associate higher pitch with higher luminance. Thirty-three humans and six chimpanzees were required to classify black and white squares according to their color while hearing irrelevant background sounds that were either high-pitched or low-pitched. Both species performed better when the background sound was congruent (high-pitched for white, low-pitched for black) than when it was incongruent (low-pitched for white, high-pitched for black). An inherent tendency to pair high pitch with high luminance hence evolved before the human lineage split from that of chimpanzees. Rather than being a culturally learned or a linguistic phenomenon, this mapping constitutes a basic feature of the primate sensory system.
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Old 12-06-2011, 06:44 AM   #1623769  /  #2
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The third chimpanzee manifests in shimmering birefringent gold.
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Old 12-06-2011, 07:36 PM   #1624440  /  #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SteveF View Post
Quote:
Chimpanzees meld sounds and colours, associating light objects with high tones and dark objects with deeper tones.

The finding hints that chimps, like humans, experience some form of synaesthesia, an uncommon condition in which the senses become intertwined, says Vera Ludwig, a cognitive neuroscientist at Charité Medical University in Berlin, Germany, who led a study published this week in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences1. Some synaesthetes associate different colours with letters and numbers, for instance, whereas others taste shapes.

Nearly all humans tend to link high-pitched sounds with lighter, brighter hues and bass-filled sounds with dark shades. People judge high vowels, such as 'mil', as white, for example, and consider lower-toned syllables, such as 'mol', as black. Ludwig thinks such connections represent a mild form of synaesthesia, with both emerging from neural cross-wiring between nearby brain regions involved in processing senses.

To determine whether humans learn to associate sounds and colours from others, or whether they are innate and do not require language, Ludwig searched for the associations in captive chimpanzees.
http://www.nature.com/news/the-chimp...-sounds-1.9541

paper:

Quote:
Ludwig, V. et al. (2011) Visuoauditory mappings between high luminance and high pitch are shared by chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and humans.

Humans share implicit preferences for certain cross-sensory combinations; for example, they consistently associate higher-pitched sounds with lighter colors, smaller size, and spikier shapes. In the condition of synesthesia, people may experience such cross-modal correspondences to a perceptual degree (e.g., literally seeing sounds). So far, no study has addressed the question whether nonhuman animals share cross-modal correspondences as well. To establish the evolutionary origins of cross-modal mappings, we tested whether chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) also associate higher pitch with higher luminance. Thirty-three humans and six chimpanzees were required to classify black and white squares according to their color while hearing irrelevant background sounds that were either high-pitched or low-pitched. Both species performed better when the background sound was congruent (high-pitched for white, low-pitched for black) than when it was incongruent (low-pitched for white, high-pitched for black). An inherent tendency to pair high pitch with high luminance hence evolved before the human lineage split from that of chimpanzees. Rather than being a culturally learned or a linguistic phenomenon, this mapping constitutes a basic feature of the primate sensory system.
Cool - Luria's "Mind of a Mnemonist" is one of my all-time favourite books - he would have loved this
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Old 12-06-2011, 07:51 PM   #1624453  /  #4
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The trait came from the common ancestor of chimps and humans.
Correct?
What was that common ancestor?
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Old 12-06-2011, 07:54 PM   #1624455  /  #5
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The trait came from the common ancestor of chimps and humans.
Correct?
What was that common ancestor?
her name was Georgette.
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Old 12-06-2011, 08:39 PM   #1624546  /  #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Socrates View Post
The trait came from the common ancestor of chimps and humans.
Correct?
What was that common ancestor?
The trait of my nose came from the common ancestor of my mother's side of the family.

WHAT was that common ancestor?
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Old 12-06-2011, 09:07 PM   #1624592  /  #7
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Originally Posted by Socrates View Post
The trait came from the common ancestor of chimps and humans.
Correct?
What was that common ancestor?
Pan prior
Not pterosaur
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Old 12-06-2011, 09:40 PM   #1624634  /  #8
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However, Richard Dawkins in his book "The Ancestor's tale" proposes that robust Australopithecines: Paranthropus, are the ancestors of gorillas, whereas some of the gracile australopithecus are the ancestors of chimpanzees
Really?
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Old 12-06-2011, 11:39 PM   #1624843  /  #9
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wut?
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Old 12-07-2011, 12:03 AM   #1624884  /  #10
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Originally Posted by eversbane View Post
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However, Richard Dawkins in his book "The Ancestor's tale" proposes that robust Australopithecines: Paranthropus, are the ancestors of gorillas, whereas some of the gracile australopithecus are the ancestors of chimpanzees
Really?
That's also the thesis of John Gribbin and Jeremy Cherfas in "The First Chimpanzee: In Search of Human Origins" (specifically afarensis). I know of a few anthropologists who have suggested this hypothesis.
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Old 12-08-2011, 05:12 AM   #1627203  /  #11
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Utter bollocks. And I misdoubt that Dawkins says any such thing.
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Old 12-08-2011, 03:02 PM   #1627416  /  #12
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Originally Posted by Monad View Post
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Originally Posted by eversbane View Post
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However, Richard Dawkins in his book "The Ancestor's tale" proposes that robust Australopithecines: Paranthropus, are the ancestors of gorillas, whereas some of the gracile australopithecus are the ancestors of chimpanzees
Really?
That's also the thesis of John Gribbin and Jeremy Cherfas in "The First Chimpanzee: In Search of Human Origins" (specifically afarensis). I know of a few anthropologists who have suggested this hypothesis.
It's a good thing then that I've never read Richard Dawkins.* I have avoided being led astray.





----------------
* haven't read these other goobers, either, thank goodness.
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"equilibrium points are not dense in the phase space."
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"[T]here seems to be a lot of quackery here -- almost a New Age belief in the power of a gut unspoiled by burgers and fries."
-John Hawks
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